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Old Town of Lijiang

Old Town of Lijiang

The Old Town of Lijiang, which is perfectly adapted to the uneven topography of this key commercial and strategic site, has retained a historic townscape of high quality and authenticity. Its architecture is noteworthy for the blending of elements from several cultures that have come together over many centuries. Lijiang also possesses an ancient water-supply system of great complexity and ingenuity that still functions effectively today.

Vieille ville de Lijiang

La vieille ville de Lijiang, harmonieusement adaptée à la topographie irrégulière de ce site commercial et stratégique clé, a conservé un paysage urbain historique de grande qualité et éminemment authentique. Son architecture est remarquable par l'association d'éléments de plusieurs cultures réunies durant de nombreux siècles. Lijiang possède également un système d'alimentation en eau extrêmement complexe et ingénieux qui fonctionne toujours efficacement.

مدينة ليجيانغ القديمة

تكيّفت مدينة ليجيانغ القديمة مع تقلّبات طوبوغرافيا هذا الموقع التجاري والإستراتيجي المحوري وقد حافظت على منظر حضري تاريخي متميّز وأصيل كلّ الأصالة. تنفرد هندستها بالمزاوجة بين عناصر ثقافات عدّة اجتمعت على مرِّ قرونٍ عدّة. كما تملك ليجيانغ نظام إمدادات مائيّة معقّد ومبتكر لا زال يعمل بفعالية.

source: UNESCO/ERI

丽江古城

古城丽江,把经济和战略重地与崎岖的地势巧妙地融合在一起,真实、完美地保存和再现了古朴的风貌。古城的建筑历经数个世纪的洗礼,融汇了各个民族的文化特色而声名远扬。丽江还拥有古老的供水系统,这一系统纵横交错、精巧独特,至今仍在有效地发挥着作用。

source: UNESCO/ERI

Старый город Лицзян

Старый город Лицзян, который превосходно адаптирован к сложному рельефу этой важной в торговом и стратегическом отношении местности, отлично сохранил свой подлинный исторический облик. Его архитектура достойна внимания из-за смешения элементов нескольких культур, развивавшихся совместно на протяжении многих столетий. Лицзян также имеет древнюю сложную систему водоснабжения, основанную на большой изобретательности, которая эффективно действует и в настоящее время.

source: UNESCO/ERI

Ciudad vieja de Lijiang

La ciudad vieja de Lijiang, que estí¡ perfectamente adaptada a la topografí­a irregular de un sitio importancia comercial y estratégica, ha conservado un paisaje urbano histórico de gran calidad y autenticidad. Su notable arquitectura integra elementos de diversas culturas que se fueron fusionando a lo largo de los siglos. Lijiang posee también un antiguo sistema de abastecimiento de agua, sumamente complejo e ingenioso, que sigue funcionando con eficacia.

source: UNESCO/ERI

麗江旧市街

source: NFUAJ

Oude stad van Lijiang

De oude binnenstad van Lijiang is perfect aangepast aan de ongelijke topografie van deze belangrijke commerciële en strategische locatie. De Lijiang regio (in het noorden van de provincie Yunnan) wordt al sinds de steentijd door mensen bewoond. In de 13e eeuw na Christus werden aan de voet van de Shizi bergen huizen gebouwd, omringd door een stadsmuur en gracht. Deze historische kern is prachtig bewaard gebleven. De architectuur is opmerkelijk vanwege het samengaan van elementen uit verschillende culturen door de eeuwen heen. Lijiang heeft ook een oud ingenieus systeem voor watervoorziening dat tegenwoordig nog steeds functioneert.

Source: unesco.nl

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Old Town of Lijiang © Fiona Starr
Justification for Inscription

The Committee decided to inscribe this site on the basis of cultural criteria (ii), (iv) and (v). Lijiang is an exceptional ancient town set in a dramatic landscape which represents the harmonious fusion of different cultural traditions to produce an urban landscape of outstanding quality.

Long Description

Lijiang is an exceptional ancient town set in a dramatic landscape which represents the harmonious fusion of different cultural traditions to produce an urban landscape of outstanding quality.

In the 13th century AD, during the later Southern Song dynasty, the ancestors of the ruling Mu family moved their main centre from Baisha to the foot of the Shizi Mountains to a new town known as Dayechang (later Dayan), where they began building houses surrounded by a city wall and moat. After Azong Aliang submitted in the 1250s to the authority of the Yuan Emperor Hubilie, Dayechang became an administrative centre. The Lijiang Junmin prefecture was established when the region came under Ming rule in 1382.

In 1724 the first non-native prefect began building prefectural offices, barracks and educational facilities at the foot of the Jinhong Mountain. Lijiang County was created as part of Lijiang Junmin Prefecture in 1770. The old town of Lijiang is built on a mountain slope running from north-west to south-east, facing a deep river.

The northern part of the city was a commercial district. The main streets in this part of the old town radiate from the broad street known as Sifangjie, which has traditionally been the commercial and trading centre of the north-western part of Yunnan Province. On the west side of the Sifangjie is the imposing three-storeyed Kegongfang (Imperial Examination Archway), which is flanked by the Western and Central rivers.

A sluice on the former uses the different levels of the two waterways to wash the streets, a unique form of municipal sanitation. The streets are paved with slabs of a fine-grained red breccia. Water flows from here to the Shuangshi Bridge, where it branches into three tributaries. These subdivide into a network of channels and culverts to supply every house in the town. This water supply is supplemented by many springs and wells within the town itself. A system of watercourses of this complexity necessitates a large number of bridges of varying sizes. There are 354 bridges altogether; they take several forms. It is from these structures that Lijiang derives its name, the 'City of Bridges'. The feature of Lijiang that is most representative of the Naxi minority culture is its wealth of domestic dwellings. The basic timber-framed structure developed into a unique architectural style with the absorption of elements of Han and Zang architecture. Most of the houses are two-storeyed. The chuandoushi wooden frames are walled with adobe on the ground floor and planks on the upper floors; the walls have stone foundation courses. The exteriors of the walls are plastered and lime-washed, and there are often brick panels at the corners. The houses have tiled roofs and an external corridor or veranda.

Special attention is paid to the decoration of the houses, especially in the arches over gateways, the screen walls, the external corridors, the doors and windows, the courtyards and the roof beams. Wooden elements are elaborately carved with domestic and cultural elements - pottery, musical instruments, flowers, birds, etc. - and gate arches take several elegant forms.

The Lijiang Junmin Prefectural Government Office and Mujia Compound were established in 1368, during the Ming dynasty, in the eastern part of the city. The 286 m long government office was a complex of halls, towers, bridges, terraces, pavilions and palaces. To the north was the official residence, known as the Mujia Compound. It was largely destroyed by war during the Qing dynasty and only the Yizi Pavilion, the Guagbi Tower, and a stone archway survive. The group known as the Yuquan architectural structures is in the Heilongtan Park and date from the Ming and Qing dynasties. Most notable is the Wufeng Tower (1601), moved from the Fugue Temple, of which it formed part, and now designated as one of the major historical sites in Yunnan Province. In addition to the Dayan old town, established in the Ming dynasty, the earlier Baisha quarter, the centre during the preceding Song and Yuan dynasties, survives 8 km to the north.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC
Historical Description

There has been continuous human occupation of the Lijiang region since the Palaeolithic period. During the Warring States Period (475-221 BC) it was under the jurisdiction of the Shu region of the Qin State. In the Western and Eastern Han Dynasties it was established as Suijiu County.

In the 13th century AD, during the later Southern Song Dynasty, the ancestors of the ruling Mu family moved their main centre from Baisha to the foot of the Shizi Mountains, to a new town known as Dayechang (later Dayan), where they began building houses surrounded by a city wall and moat.

After Azong Aliang submitted in the 1250s to the authority of the Yuan Emperor Hubilie, Dayechang became an administrative centre. The Lijiang Junmin prefecture was established when the region came under Ming rule in 1382. The prefect of the tune, Ajia Ade, was awarded the honorific surname "Mu" and made an hereditary prefect, a title that was confirmed by the Qmg Dynasty rulers in 1660. The successive Mu prefects were responsible for enlarging and embellishing their centre throughout this period.

In 1723 the Imperial court changed its policy and the native prefect was replaced by an Imperial appointee. The first non-native prefect, Yang Bi, arrived the following year and began building prefectural offices, barracks, and educational facilities at the foot of the Jinhong Mountain. Lijiang County was created as part of Lijiang Junmin Prefecture in 1770, and survived when the prefecture was abolished by the Republic in 1912. Lijiang has continued to fimction as an administrative centre ever since, now for the Lijiang Naxi Autonomous County.

The region is subject to earthquakes, and the town suffered on several occasions - 1481, 1515, 1624, 1751, 1895, 1933, 1951, 1961, 1977, and most recently on 3 February 1996. Damage to property and loss of life has been severe, particularly in the 1951 quake.

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation