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Kondoa Irangi Rock Paintings

Date of Submission: 31/10/2000
Criteria: (iii)(vi)
Category: Cultural
Submitted by:
D.Kamamba, Actin Director of Antiquities
Coordinates: Lat. 4°25'- 4°45' S / Long. 35°40'- 36°00' E
Ref.: 1494
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Description

The Kondoa Irangi Rock Paintings are located along the Maasai Escarpment bordering the Great Rift Valley. The rock painting is spread out over a wide area within Kondoa district. The exact boarders of the proposed World Heritage site have not been determined yet, but will be drawn up in consultation with all stakeholders during the management planning process that accompanies the nomination dossier. The rock art found at these sites is the northern-most extension of the southern African hunter-gatherer rock art tradition. It comes primarily from the hunter-gatherer period with red pigment in the outline, streaky, and silhouette styles. Subject matter ranges from animals significant to the cosmology of the artists to human figures in a variety of postures, and non-figurative designs. Giraffe, eland, and elephants predominate. Art can also be found from the more recent agriculturist period. These so-called “late whites” are usually finger paintings of abstract designs and more occasionally of humans and animals.