Take advantage of the search to browse through the World Heritage Centre information.

Garamba National Park

Democratic Republic of the Congo
Factors affecting the property in 2021*
  • Civil unrest
  • Illegal activities
  • War
Factors* affecting the property identified in previous reports
  • Armed conflict and political instability
  • Poaching by nationals and trans-border armed groups
  • Inappropriate management capabilities to address the poaching crisis (resolved)
Threats for which the property was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger
  • Increased poaching
  • Pressure linked to the civil war, thereby threatening the flagship species of the property
Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger

In progress

Corrective Measures for the property

Adopted in 2010, see page https://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/4082 
Revised in 2016, see page https://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6652 

Timeframe for the implementation of the corrective measures

In progress

UNESCO Extra-Budgetary Funds until 2021

Total amount granted: USD 937,000 from the United Nations Foundation, the Governments of Italy, Belgium and Spain and the Rapid Response Facility; USD 200,000 from the Government of Norway in 2020

International Assistance: requests for the property until 2021
Requests approved: 14 (from 1980-2018)
Total amount approved : 353,270 USD
Conservation issues presented to the World Heritage Committee in 2021

On 26 March 2020, the State Party submitted a state of conservation report on the property, and additional information on 12 March 2021, all available at http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/136/documents/, providing the following information:

  • The agreements between the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN) and the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (FARDC) are renewed every three months. In 2019, 90 sections of the FARDC were under the command of the Park authority for strategic and operational exercises;
  • The technical capacities of the guards have been strengthened and the site has a canine unit available to improve surveillance in the Park. The number of guards has increased from 243 to 286 (238 guards and 48 security agents). The number of patrols has increased from 447 (2018) to 630 (2019) and to 744 (2020), leading to arrests and seizures of illegal products. Surveillance coverage represents 68% of the property and 32% of the hunting grounds, and 100% for aerial patrols;
  • A first meeting on transboundary cooperation was organized with the State Service responsible for South Sudan Wildlife (SSWLS) and the signature of a Memorandum of Understanding is foreseen;
  • The preparation of a Land-use Plan for the hunting grounds continues. A ministerial decree now prohibits artisanal exploitation in the hunting grounds of Gangala Na Bodio, Azande and Mondo Missa. A six-month moratorium was given to the illegal operators to evacuate the sites;
  • The implementation of the sustainable development strategy (2018) is underway, and access to health care and various activities covering educational to environmental services is provided to the staff of the Park and the neighbouring communities;
  • The results of the anti-poaching combat (APC) mark a significant reduction in elephant poaching (8 individuals against 50 in 2017), 77 arrests of which the transfer of 17 cases to the competent courts, the confiscation of 18 firearms and no loss of life of guards for the third year running;
  • An aerial survey of elephants, a genome study and the surveillance of elephants by means of radio collars provided information on the state of conservation of the species. Thanks to the support of the Government of Norway and UNESCO, several groups of elephants are continuously monitored using satellite collars placed on 38 individuals. No indication of the presence of white rhinoceros has been recorded since 2008. The giraffe population has increased by seven individuals since 2018 and the species has not suffered from poaching.

The results of the implementation of International Assistance reveal that the elephant population has stabilized at around 700 individuals, and that the Kordofan giraffe population has already exceeded the target of 60 individuals for 2022.  Finally, the management of invasive species remains a major challenge for the site.

Analysis and Conclusion by World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in 2021

The efforts undertaken by the State Party and its partners to strengthen the APC measures are warmly welcomed. The increase in the number of guards in the Park and the strengthening of their operational capacity has enabled an increase in the level of surveillance coverage of the site by regular ground patrols (68%) against 100% for aerial patrols. The maintenance of permanent efficient surveillance of the Park is encouraged.

The significant decrease in the number of poached elephant carcasses, the seizure of wildlife products and the absence of poaching of giraffes is positive, but the continuing poaching inside the Park is a cause for concern, and the measures to control this threat must continue in the long-term. The estimate of the elephant population within the Garamba complex at around 700 individuals indicates the significant impact of poaching on the species.  It should be recalled that the elephant population of the property was estimated at more than 11,000 individuals in 1995, before the start of the conflict (in 1996) and that the last census in 2017 estimated the population at 1191 elephants. Noting also that the African savanna elephant (Loxodonta Africana) is “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species in 2021, it is recommended that the State Party consolidate and strengthen protection efforts of the species.

Recent surveillance data on wildlife indicate a gradual reconstitution of the Kordofan giraffe population with seven new individuals for a total of 62 giraffes recorded. With regard to the conservation status of the species (in critical danger of extinction), it is recommended that the Committee reiterate its request to the State Party to continue strengthening the protection of the species in the framework of a priority Action Plan. 

Noting that a scientific project for assisted reproduction from genetic material taken from the most recent specimens in captivity is ongoing, the lack of any indication of the presence of white rhinoceros in the Park since 2008 would confirm that the sub-species is probably extinct in the wild state. Given that the white rhinoceros is a flagship species, a reflection on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property is indispensable.

The relaunch of transboundary cooperation with the State Party of South Sudan is positive, and it is important that the State Party finalize the Memorandum of Understanding to concretize and render operational collaboration on the ground.

The lack of a Management Plan for the site remains of concern and it is regrettable that no information has been provided concerning the preparation process for this strategic document in accordance with Decision 43 COM 7A.7. The ongoing preparation of the Land-Use Plan and the ministerial decree prohibiting artisanal exploitation in the hunting grounds are welcomed and it is important to finalize the Land-Use Plan as well as the reconversion process for the gold miners and the transfer of the gold mining activity outside the hunting grounds to provide the property with a functional buffer zone.

The implementation of the sustainable development strategy to reinforce the resilience of the local communities is welcomed. However, these efforts must be strengthened to increase the autonomy of these communities.

Finally, the absence of the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) is worrying and it is recommended that, based on the inventory data available, including the International Assistance results, the State Party finalize the DSOCR prepared by the 2016 mission. It is also recommended to maintain the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger. However, in view of the progress achieved by the State Party, despite all, it is recommended that the Committee no longer apply the reinforced monitoring mechanism for the property.


46. General decision on the World Heritage properties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Current conservation issues

On 26 March 2020, the State Party submitted a report on the implementation of Decision 42 COM 7A.52, available at: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/718/documents and providing the following information:

  • Progress accomplished in the implementation of the 2011 Kinshasa Declaration and the corrective measures for each of the five properties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is described (see Document WHC/21/44.COM/7A);
  • A special army Corps responsible for security of the National Parks and relevant protected areas (CorPPN), which was created in June 2015, is now operational: a command structure was established in 2018, and in 2019 anti-poaching units were dispatched to six priority sites in the DRC, including all five World Heritage properties. Senior officers, logistics and operations rooms were put in place in the different sites;
  • With regard to oil exploitation in Salonga and Virunga National Parks, the report states that oil exploitation, at this stage, does not threaten the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the two properties, as no exploration or exploitation activities are on-going. The report further states that “la volonté traduite à son temps par le gouvernement n’est plus à l’ordre du jour” (sic) (“the will expressed by the government at that time is no longer on the agenda”);
  • A list of funding mobilised for the five properties for the period 2016 to 2023, totalling more than 100 million Euros, is provided. Key donors include the European Commission and the Government of Germany through the German Development Bank (KfW). No further information is provided on the status of the Trust Fund “Okapi Fund for Conservation – FOCON” for sustainable funding of the protected areas in the DRC;

The World Heritage Centre also received several letters on alleged human rights abuses by eco-guards in two properties (Salonga and Kahuzi-Biega National Parks). These were forwarded to the protected area authority, the Congolese Institute for the Conservation of Nature (ICCN). An Independent Review was initiated by WWF, and in Salonga National Park, a code of conduct for the eco-guards and a complaint mechanism were established, while guards have received training on human rights issues.


Analysis and Conclusions of the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies

The operationalization of the CorPPN at the level of each of the World Heritage properties, together with the creation of operational rooms and capacity building of the eco-guards, are important steps to further professionalize law enforcement in the properties and address the continuing threats of poaching, including by professional poaching groups. The reported alleged human rights abuses towards  indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) are highly concerning, and it is crucial that the State Party urgently implement strong measures to ensure that the rights of IPLCs are fully respected in all management decisions. Measures should include the establishment of a code of conduct and provision of training on human rights issues for all patrol units that includes appropriate law enforcement techniques with regard to the use of force and forearms, to ensure law enforcement operations are conducted in a way that fully respects the rights of IPLCs, and avoids excessive use of force and loss of human lives, in full respect  of relevant international norms. Furthermore, management processes should follow a rights-based approach and ensure full involvement of all rightsholders and stakeholders, in particular IPLCs, in line with the Policy on World Heritage and Sustainable Development. It is encouraging that the protected area authority and its partners have already taken measures to address these issues and it is recommended that the Committee request the State Party to further strengthen these efforts including by establishing and implementing a national code of conduct for eco-guards and a grievance mechanism for human rights abuses, and by training all law enforcement staff on human rights issues as part of regular training. It is also recommended that the outcomes of the Independent Review are taken into consideration.

It is noted that the security situation is reported to have improved in most of the properties. It is important that the State Party takes advantage of this situation to address the drivers of fundamental threats impacting the different properties linked to insecurity and lawlessness. These include the closure of illegal mining operations and reclaiming parts of the properties occupied by armed forces since the start of the conflict. Encouraging achievements so far are the evacuation of illegal occupants in the corridor between the highland and lowland sectors in Kahuzi-Biega National Park and the closure of artisanal gold mines in the hunting areas surrounding Garamba National Park. It is crucial that the protected area authority receives the full support of all appropriate ministries and agencies, as well as traditional and political authorities to achieve this, in line with the 2011 Kinshasa Declaration.

It is concerning however, that issues of insecurity persist, noting particularly in Virunga National Park and Okapi Wildlife Reserve, where, since the previous session of the Committee, a further 25 park staff were killed in armed attacks. It is recommended that the Committee again strongly condemn this violence, address its condolences to the families of the victims and ICCN staff, and express its utmost concern regarding the continuing insecurity in and around Virunga National Park.

The confirmation by the State Party that there is currently no oil exploration or exploitation on-going in Virunga and Salonga National Parks and that the government is currently no longer pursuing oil development projects inside the two properties, is noted. However, as long as the concessions that have been attributed by Presidential Decree to companies for oil blocks overlapping with these properties are not revoked, the potential for oil projects to legally proceed in future remains, thereby continuing to impose a potential threat to the OUV of the properties, in line with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines. This potential for extractive activities to occur has been demonstrated again by the legal action taken by certain companies against the State Party, asserting their legal rights to activate concessions. It is therefore recommended that the Committee express its regret that the State Party has neither cancelled these concessions nor provided the Committee with an unequivocal commitment not to authorize any new oil exploration and exploitation within the boundaries of the DRC properties. The Committee should also reiterate its clear position concerning the incompatibility of oil exploration and exploitation with World Heritage status and urge once again the State Party to cancel all concessions for oil blocks that overlap with World Heritage properties. 

The important efforts to mobilize funding for the management of the properties of the DRC and the implementation of corrective measures, as well as the firm commitment of the various donors to provide substantial financial and technical support, are welcomed. However, it is noted that the funding situation remains precarious, in particular for Salonga and Kahuzi-Biega National Parks and Okapi Wildlife Reserve. The importance of a sustainable financing mechanism also needs to be stressed, as all properties currently fully depend on outside project funding supported by international donors, which can be unpredictable and is not sustainable in the long term. In this respect, it is regrettable that no further information was provided on the status and capitalisation of the FOCON Trust Fund.

Decisions adopted by the Committee in 2021
44 COM 7A.41
Garamba National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) (N 136)

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/21/44.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decisions 41 COM 7A.7 and 43 COM 7A.7, adopted respectively at its 41st (Cracow, 2017) and 43rd (Baku, 2019) sessions,
  3. Welcomes the continued efforts of the State Party aimed at improving the anti-poaching measures, with the deployment of an additional 183 guards, to strengthen its operational capacities, intensify its surveillance efforts and implement initiatives to support the communities, and encourages the State Party to pursue its efforts with support from its partners;
  4. Notes the significant decrease in the number of elephant carcasses poached, the estimate of the current numbers of the species at around 700 individuals, and the seizure of wildlife products, but notes with great concern that the population has declined by more than 90% since the onset of the security crisis in 1996 and has continued to decline since the last census in 2017, and that elephant poaching remains a major threat, and requests the State Party to continue its efforts to control poaching in order to create conditions for the recovery of wildlife and to provide the World Heritage Centre with more ample information on elephant numbers in the property for examination by IUCN;
  5. Also notes with satisfaction the increase to 62 individuals of the Kordofan giraffe population and the absence of poaching in 2019 and 2020, and recalling that the sub-species remains in critical danger of extinction, reiterates its request to the State Party to pursue its monitoring and ecological protection efforts of this species, and also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre the Strategy and Action Plan for the conservation of giraffes within the property;
  6. Thanks the donors who continue to support the conservation of the property, in particular the European Commission and the Government of Norway through their funding to the World Heritage Fund;
  7. Expresses its deep concern with regard to the absence of any indication of the presence of white rhinoceros in the Park since 2008, confirming the probable extinction of the sub-species, and further requests the State Party, in cooperation with the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, to carry out a reflection on the impacts of this probable extinction on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) on the property;
  8. Commends the State Party for the dialogue on transboundary cooperation between the Direction of the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN) and the State Service responsible for South Sudan Wildlife (SSWLS) and also encourages the State Party to strengthen this cooperation to reduce criminal transboundary activities, such as poaching and transboundary commerce of illegal wildlife products, notably through the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding for transboundary cooperation;
  9. Regrets the absence of a Management Plan for the property and an operative buffer zone and urges the State Party to accelerate the creation of a buffer zone and to finalize the Management Plan of the property including its periphery, while ensuring its coherence with the sustainable development strategy of the Park, the Land Use Plan for the hunting grounds, the 2019 ministerial decree prohibiting artisanal exploitation in the hunting grounds, the relocation strategy for the refugee camps outside the Park initiated in 2018 and any other strategic document;7C
  10. Also regrets once again that the State Party has not yet submitted the final version of the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) and also reiterates its request to the State Party to develop clear indicators for the recovery of the key wildlife populations based on the proposal prepared by the 2016 mission, data available from aerial survey and the monitoring system, so as to identify an achievable calendar for the eventual removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger;
  11. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2022, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 45th session;
  12. Decides to no longer apply the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism to the property;
  13. Also decides to retain Garamba National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
44 COM 7A.46
General decision on the World Heritage properties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/21/44.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 42 COM 7A.52, adopted at its 42nd session (Manama, 2018),
  3. Appreciates the continued efforts of the State Party to implement the Kinshasa Declaration adopted in 2011, in particular the progress made with the operationalization of Corps responsible for the security of the National Parks and relevant protected areas (CorPPN) at the level of each of the five World Heritage properties in order to face the continuing threats of poaching, including by professional poaching groups;
  4. Notes with significant concern the reports on alleged human rights abuses towards indigenous peoples and local communities during law enforcement operations and requests the State Party to take urgent measures to further strengthen its efforts to address this issue, including by establishing and implementing a national code of conduct for eco-guards and a grievance mechanism for human rights abuses, and by training all protected area staff on human rights issues as part of regular law enforcement training, as well as ensuring that management processes follow a rights-based approach and ensure full involvement of all stakeholders, in particular local and indigenous communities, in line with relevant international norms, the Policy on World Heritage and Sustainable Development, and taking into consideration the outcomes of the Independent Review;
  5. Welcomes the improvement in the security situation in most properties, and urges the State Party to take advantage of this improved security situation to address the fundamental threats to the different properties, including by closing all remaining illegal mining operations and reclaiming parts of the properties occupied by armed forces since the start of the conflict, ensuring the support of all appropriate ministries and agencies as well as traditional and political authorities to achieve this, in line with the 2011 Kinshasa Declaration;
  6. Expresses its utmost concern regarding the continued insecurity in Virunga National Park and Okapi Wildlife Reserve which resulted in further park staff being killed in the line of duty, strongly condemns this violence once again and addresses its sincere condolences to the families of the victims and all ICCN staff;
  7. While noting the statement by the State Party that the government is currently no longer pursuing oil exploration or exploitation activities within Virunga and Salonga National Parks, strongly regrets that the State Party has not cancelled the oil concessions it has attributed which overlap with these properties, and that it has not yet provided the Committee with a firm commitment not to authorize any oil exploration and exploitation within the boundaries of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) World Heritage properties, as requested in previous decisions;
  8. Reiterates its position according to which oil and gas exploration and exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status and also urges once again the State Party to cancel these concessions and to undertake a commitment not to authorize any new oil exploration and exploitation within the boundaries of any World Heritage property;
  9. Commends the efforts of the State Party to make operational the “Okapi Fund for Conservation – FOCON” as the Trust Fund for protected areas in the DRC, and also requests the State Party, and the donor community, to provide it with adequate funding to effectively respond to the management needs of the DRC World Heritage properties;
  10. Also appreciates the important efforts to mobilize funding for the management of the DRC properties and the implementation of the corrective measures, as well as the firm commitment of the various donors to provide substantial financial and technical support, but notes that the funding situation remains precarious, in particular for Salonga and Kahuzi-Biega National Parks and Okapi Wildlife Reserve, and stresses the importance of ensuring a sustainable financing mechanism, while regretting that no further information was provided on the status and capitalisation of the FOCON Trust Fund, and further requests the State Party to report on progress in this regard;
  11. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2022, a detailed report on the implementation of the Kinshasa Declaration, the security situation in the properties, and the status of the oil exploration and exploitation concessions that encroach on World Heritage properties, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 45th session.
44 COM 8C.2
Update of the List of World Heritage in Danger (Retained Properties)

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined the state of conservation reports of properties inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger (WHC/21/44.COM/7A, WHC/21/44.COM/7A.Add, WHC/21/44.COM/7A.Add.2, WHC/21/44.COM/7A.Add.2.Add),
  2. Decides to retain the following properties on the List of World Heritage in Danger:
  • Afghanistan, Cultural Landscape and Archaeological Remains of the Bamiyan Valley (Decision 44 COM 7A.28)
  • Afghanistan, Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam (Decision 44 COM 7A.29)
  • Austria, Historic Centre of Vienna (Decision 44 COM 7A.32)
  • Bolivia (Plurinational State of), City of Potosí (Decision 44 COM 7A.35)
  • Central African Republic, Manovo-Gounda St Floris National Park (Decision 44 COM 7A.39)
  • Côte d'Ivoire / Guinea, Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve (Decision 44 COM 7A.40)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo, Garamba National Park (Decision 44 COM 7A.41)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kahuzi-Biega National Park (Decision 44 COM 7A.42)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo, Okapi Wildlife Reserve (Decision 44 COM 7A.43)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo, Virunga National Park (Decision 44 COM 7A.45)
  • Egypt, Abu Mena (Decision 44 COM 7A.5)
  • Honduras, Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve (Decision 44 COM 7A.55)
  • Indonesia, Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (Decision 44 COM 7A.52)
  • Iraq, Ashur (Qal'at Sherqat) (Decision 44 COM 7A.6)
  • Iraq, Hatra (Decision 44 COM 7A.7)
  • Iraq, Samarra Archaeological City (Decision 44 COM 7A.8)
  • Old City of Jerusalem and its Walls (site proposed by Jordan) (Decision 44 COM 7A.10)
  • Kenya, Lake Turkana National Parks (Decision 44 COM 7A.47)
  • Libya, Archaeological Site of Cyrene (Decision 44 COM 7A.11)
  • Libya, Archaeological Site of Leptis Magna (Decision 44 COM 7A.12)
  • Libya, Archaeological Site of Sabratha (Decision 44 COM 7A.13)
  • Libya, Old Town of Ghadamès (Decision 44 COM 7A.14)
  • Libya, Rock-Art Sites of Tadrart Acacus (Decision 44 COM 7A.15)
  • Madagascar, Rainforests of the Atsinanana (Decision 44 COM 7A.48)
  • Mali, Old Towns of Djenné (Decision 44 COM 7A.1)
  • Mali, Timbuktu (Decision 44 COM 7A.2)
  • Mali, Tomb of Askia (Decision 44 COM 7A.3)
  • Mexico, Islands and Protected Areas of the Gulf of California (Decision 44 COM 7B.56)
  • Micronesia (Federated States of), Nan Madol: Ceremonial Centre of Eastern Micronesia (Decision 44 COM 7A.30)
  • Niger, Aïr and Ténéré Natural Reserves (Decision 44 COM 7A.49)
  • Palestine, Palestine: Land of Olives and Vines – Cultural Landscape of Southern Jerusalem, Battir (Decision 44 COM 7A.17)
  • Palestine, Hebron/Al-Khalil Old Town (Decision 44 COM 7A.16)
  • Panama, Fortifications on the Caribbean Side of Panama: Portobelo-San Lorenzo (Decision 44 COM 7A.36)
  • Peru, Chan Chan Archaelogical Zone (Decision 44 COM 7A.37)
  • Senegal, Niokolo-Koba National Park (Decision 44 COM 7A.50)
  • Serbia, Medieval Monuments in Kosovo (Decision 44 COM 7A.33)
  • Solomon Islands, East Rennell (Decision 44 COM 7A.53)
  • Syrian Arab Republic, Ancient City of Aleppo (Decision 44 COM 7A.18)
  • Syrian Arab Republic, Ancient City of Bosra (Decision 44 COM 7A.19)
  • Syrian Arab Republic, Ancient City of Damascus (Decision 44 COM 7A.20)
  • Syrian Arab Republic, Ancient Villages of Northern Syria (Decision 44 COM 7A.21)
  • Syrian Arab Republic, Crac des Chevaliers and Qal’at Salah El-Din (Decision 44 COM 7A.22)
  • Syrian Arab Republic, Site of Palmyra (Decision 44 COM 7A.23)
  • Uganda, Tombs of Buganda Kings at Kasubi (Decision 44 COM 7A.4)
  • United Republic of Tanzania, Selous Game Reserve (Decision 44 COM 7A.51)
  • United States of America, Everglades National Park (Decision 44 COM 7A.54)
  • Uzbekistan, Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz (Decision 44 COM 7A.31)
  • Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Coro and its Port (Decision 44 COM 7A.38)
  • Yemen, Historic Town of Zabid (Decision 44 COM 7A.25)
  • Yemen, Old City of Sana’a (Decision 44 COM 7A.26)
  • Yemen, Old Walled City of Shibam (Decision 44 COM 7A.27).
Draft Decision: 44 COM 7A.41

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/21/44.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decisions 41 COM 7A.7 and 43 COM 7A.7, adopted respectively at its 41st (Cracow, 2017) and 43rd (Baku, 2019) sessions,
  3. Welcomes the continued efforts of the State Party aimed at improving the anti-poaching measures, with the deployment of an additional 183 guards, to strengthen its operational capacities, intensify its surveillance efforts and implement initiatives to support the communities, and encourages the State Party to pursue its efforts with support from its partners;
  4. Notes the significant decrease in the number of elephant carcasses poached, the estimate of the current numbers of the species at around 700 individuals, and the seizure of wildlife products, but notes with great concern that the population has declined by more than 90% since the onset of the security crisis in 1996 and has continued to decline since the last census in 2017, and that elephant poaching remains a major threat, and requests the State Party to continue its efforts to control poaching in order to create conditions for the recovery of wildlife and to provide the World Heritage Centre with more ample information on elephant numbers in the property for examination by IUCN;
  5. Also notes with satisfaction the increase to 62 individuals of the Kordofan giraffe population and the absence of poaching in 2019 and 2020, and recalling that the sub-species remains in critical danger of extinction, reiterates its request to the State Party to pursue its monitoring and ecological protection efforts of this species, and also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre the Strategy and Action Plan for the conservation of giraffes within the property;
  6. Thanks the donors who continue to support the conservation of the property, in particular the European Commission and the Government of Norway through their funding to the World Heritage Fund;
  7. Expresses its deep concern with regard to the absence of any indication of the presence of white rhinoceros in the Park since 2008, confirming the probable extinction of the sub-species, and further requests the State Party, in cooperation with the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, to carry out a reflection on the impacts of this probable extinction on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) on the property;
  8. Commends the State Party for the dialogue on transboundary cooperation between the Direction of the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN) and the State Service responsible for South Sudan Wildlife (SSWLS) and also encourages the State Party to strengthen this cooperation to reduce criminal transboundary activities, such as poaching and transboundary commerce of illegal wildlife products, notably through the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding for transboundary cooperation;
  9. Regrets the absence of a Management Plan for the property and an operative buffer zone and urges the State Party to accelerate the creation of a buffer zone and to finalize the Management Plan of the property including its periphery, while ensuring its coherence with the sustainable development strategy of the Park, the Land Use Plan for the hunting grounds, the 2019 ministerial decree prohibiting artisanal exploitation in the hunting grounds, the relocation strategy for the refugee camps outside the Park initiated in 2018 and any other strategic document;
  10. Also regrets once again that the State Party has not yet submitted the final version of the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) and also reiterates its request to the State Party to develop clear indicators for the recovery of the key wildlife populations based on the proposal prepared by the 2016 mission, data available from aerial survey and the monitoring system, so as to identify an achievable calendar for the eventual removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger;
  11. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2022, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 45th session in 2022;
  12. Decides to no longer apply the reinforced monitoring mechanism to the property;
  13. Also decides to retain Garamba National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
Report year: 2021
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Date of Inscription: 1980
Category: Natural
Criteria: (vii)(x)
Danger List (dates): 1984-1992, 1996-present
Documents examined by the Committee
SOC Report by the State Party
Report (2020) .pdf
Initialy proposed for examination in 2020
arrow_circle_right 44COM (2021)
Exports

* : The threats indicated are listed in alphabetical order; their order does not constitute a classification according to the importance of their impact on the property.
Furthermore, they are presented irrespective of the type of threat faced by the property, i.e. with specific and proven imminent danger (“ascertained danger”) or with threats which could have deleterious effects on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (“potential danger”).

** : All mission reports are not always available electronically.


top