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Lorentz National Park

Indonesia
Factors affecting the property in 2017*
  • Fishing/collecting aquatic resources
  • Ground transport infrastructure
  • Human resources
  • Illegal activities
  • Management systems/ management plan
  • Mining
  • Other climate change impacts
  • Other Threats:

    Nothofagus dieback

Factors* affecting the property identified in previous reports
  • Mining
  • Human resources (Security limitations)
  • Ground transport infrastructure (Development threats)
  • Fishing/collecting aquatic resources (Exploitation of marine resources)
  • Management systems/management plans (Absence of a co-ordinating agency, Absence of a finalized strategic management plan, Park boundaries not physically demarcated)Financial resources (Inadequate financing)
  • Other climate change impacts (Nothofagus dieback)
  • Illegal activities
International Assistance: requests for the property until 2017
Requests approved: 2 (from 1996-2001)
Total amount approved : 41,400 USD
Missions to the property until 2017**

January 2004: IUCN mission; March-April 2008: Joint UNESCO/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission; January-February 2011: Joint UNESCO/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission; March 2014: IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission

Conservation issues presented to the World Heritage Committee in 2017

On 23 November 2016, the State Party submitted a report on the state of conservation of the property, a summary of which is available at https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/955/documents. The report provides an update on issues previously noted by the Committee, as follows:

  • The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the Habbema-Kenyam road has been revised to consider IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and has been submitted with the report. It was approved by the Governor of Papua Province in 2015;
  • A review of the zonation of the property is on-going and will involve a wide range of stakeholders, including local communities. The revised zoning system will be submitted to the World Heritage Centre as soon as it is approved;
  • Research into the causes of the Nothofagus dieback continues. Results obtained so far indicate that road construction is not likely the major contributing factor. Climate change and parasitic fungi are assumed to be the primary causes;
  • Large-scale poaching has so far not been recorded at the property. Limited hunting by local people occurs to meet their needs for traditional use and cultural ceremony. Nevertheless, preventive measures have been increased, including routine patrols and awareness raising campaigns.
Analysis and Conclusion by World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in 2017

The ongoing review of the zonation of the property is welcomed, as is the participation of a wide range of stakeholders, including local communities. The current zoning system is very complex and it is recommended that the revised zoning system should be simpler to manage, while taking into account not only the traditional uses and values of local communities, but also the conservation of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property.

It is noted that no large-scale poaching has been recorded at the property. The State Party’s efforts to nonetheless increase preventive measures are noted with appreciation, and it is recommended that the Committee encourage the State Party to implement the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART) in its patrols, in order to enable an efficient use of limited resources, and to ensure that the data collected on patrols are consistent and easily interpreted by park management. It is also recommended that the Committee request the State Party to provide further information on patrol activities, including how much of the property is covered, and which species are being monitored, recalling that the World Heritage Centre and IUCN previously raised concerns about the potential threat posed to the property by the trade in wildlife species from Papua Province.

The continued research into the causes of the Nothofagus dieback is also welcomed, and it is noted that road construction, although it may be a contributing factor, is not considered a primary cause, given that dieback is found to occur randomly and sometimes at great distances from any road. The study submitted with the State Party’s report suggests that dieback may be a natural factor in the population dynamics of Nothofagus species, which nevertheless appears to be exacerbated by the impacts of climate change. Given that the high-altitude forests of the property are dominated by Nothofagus, it is recommended that the Committee urge the State Party to continue to monitor the dieback, but also the Nothofagus’ natural regeneration, in order to further the understanding of Nothofagus population dynamics and their response to the impacts of climate change.

Considering the sensitive high-altitude ecosystems of the property, including the alpine peat lands around Lake Habbema, the construction of the Habbema-Kenyam road continues to be a significant concern. The revised EIA concludes that significant environmental impacts from the road might potentially affect the property. While it further states that the road is “environmentally feasible”, the basis for that conclusion is not clear, as there is no discussion of the severity of impacts before and after implementation of the measures foreseen in the Environmental Management Plan of the EIA document. With the EIA approved by the Governor of Papua Province in 2015, it is unclear what the current state of advancement of road construction is, and how any impacts are being managed. Recognizing that the property appears to already be seeing the impacts of climate change, the road is considered to pose a significant additional risk to the fragile alpine ecosystems of the property. It is therefore recommended that the Committee request the State Party to invite an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, in order to assess the current status of road construction and the effectiveness of the Environmental Management Plan in avoiding impacts on OUV and mitigating any residual impacts.

Decisions adopted by the Committee in 2017
41 COM 7B.29
Lorentz National Park (Indonesia) (N 955)

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/17/41.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.12, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the on-going review of the zoning system of the property and urges the State Party to ensure that it results in a simpler, more manageable zoning of the property, taking into account the traditional uses of local communities and the conservation of its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
  4. Notes that large-scale poaching has not been recorded so far at the property, encourages the State Party to implement the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART) for patrols in the property, to ensure an efficient use of limited resources and consistent data collection to inform park management;
  5. Recalling previous concerns on the potential threat posed to the property by the trade in wildlife species from Papua Province, requests the State Party to provide further information about patrolling activities, including how much of the property is covered, and which species are being monitored;
  6. Also welcomes the continued research on the dieback of Nothofagus species; also notes that, while road construction is considered a potential contributing factor, the major causes for the dieback are considered to be related to impacts of climate change; and also encourages the State Party to continue monitoring Nothofagus species in order to further the understanding of their population dynamics and response to the impacts of climate change;
  7. Notes with concern that the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the Habbema-Kenyam road has identified significant environmental impacts which may affect the property, and considers that the construction of the road represents a significant additional risk for the fragile alpine environments of the property, which may exacerbate the impacts of climate change;
  8. Also requests the State Party to invite an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property in order to assess the current status of road construction and to review of the implementation of the Environmental Management Plan and its effectiveness in avoiding and mitigating impacts on the OUV;
  9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2018, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 43rd session in 2019.
Draft Decision: 41 COM 7B.29

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/17/41.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.12, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the on-going review of the zoning system of the property and urges the State Party to ensure that it results in a simpler, more manageable zoning of the property, taking into account the traditional uses of local communities and the conservation of its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
  4. Notes that large-scale poaching has not been recorded so far at the property, encourages the State Party to implement the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART) for patrols in the property, to ensure an efficient use of limited resources and consistent data collection to inform park management;
  5. Recalling previous concerns on the potential threat posed to the property by the trade in wildlife species from Papua Province, requests the State Party to provide further information about patrolling activities, including how much of the property is covered, and which species are being monitored;
  6. Also welcomes the continued research on the dieback of Nothofagus species; also notes that, while road construction is considered a potential contributing factor, the major causes for the dieback are considered to be related to impacts of climate change; and also encourages the State Party to continue monitoring Nothofagus species in order to further the understanding of their population dynamics and response to the impacts of climate change;
  7. Notes with concern that the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the Habbema-Kenyam road has identified significant environmental impacts which may affect the property, and considers that the construction of the road represents a significant additional risk for the fragile alpine environments of the property, which may exacerbate the impacts of climate change;
  8. Also requests the State Party to invite an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property in order to assess the current status of road construction and to review of the implementation of the Environmental Management Plan and its effectiveness in avoiding and mitigating impacts on the OUV;
  9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2018, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 43rd session in 2019.
Report year: 2017
Indonesia
Date of Inscription: 1999
Category: Natural
Criteria: (viii)(ix)(x)
Documents examined by the Committee
SOC Report by the State Party
Report (2016) .pdf
arrow_circle_right 41COM (2017)
Exports

* : The threats indicated are listed in alphabetical order; their order does not constitute a classification according to the importance of their impact on the property.
Furthermore, they are presented irrespective of the type of threat faced by the property, i.e. with specific and proven imminent danger (“ascertained danger”) or with threats which could have deleterious effects on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (“potential danger”).

** : All mission reports are not always available electronically.


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