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Everglades National Park

United States of America
Factors affecting the property in 1996*
  • Crop production
  • Housing
  • Industrial areas
  • Storms
  • Surface water pollution
  • Water infrastructure
Factors* affecting the property identified in previous reports
  • Agricultural, industrial and urban developments altering the natural systems;
  • Pollution of the water (nutrients and mercury);
  • Hurricane in August 1992
International Assistance: requests for the property until 1996
Requests approved: 0
Total amount approved : 0 USD
Missions to the property until 1996**
Information presented to the Bureau of the World Heritage Committee in 1996

The site was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger in 1993. At its last session, the World Heritage Committee examined a detailed monitoring report, presented by the State Party, which outlined the long-term restoration work necessary to restore the balance of the Everglades ecosystem. The State Party presented a preliminary monitoring report dated May 1996 outlining the Government's efforts to protect the site. The report acknowledges that despite significant progress made (acquisition of additional land, improved ecological indicators), the Park remains seriously in danger.

Action Required

Due to the long-term nature of the rehabilitation activities and further to the conclusions of the Committee, the Bureau recommended that the site remain on the List of World Heritage in Danger until further rehabilitation is demonstrated.

Conservation issues presented to the World Heritage Committee in 1996

The site was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger in 1993. At its last session, the World Heritage Committee examined the detailed monitoring report presented by the State Party, which outlined the precedent setting long-term experimental restoration work necessary to restore the balance of the Everglades ecosystem. The State Party presented an interim monitoring report dated May 1996 outlining the Federal and State government's $2 Billion partnership efforts with the private sector to protect the World Heritage values of the site. The State Party further indicated that Everglades now has the largest science staff of any unit in the U.S. National Park System. The report acknowledges however, that despite significant progress made (acquisition of additional land, improved ecological indicators), the Park remains in danger.

Analysis and Conclusion by World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in 1996

The Committee may wish to adopt the following:

"Due to the long-term nature of the rehabilitation activities the Committee (a) commends the State Party and its state government and private sector partners for their extraordinary efforts to protect the World Heritage values of this site, (b) encourages the State Party to consider sharing the knowledge and experience gained through this restorative effort in the rehabilitation of aquatic ecosystems with other State Parties with internationally significant wetlands in commemorative events related to both the 50th anniversary of the establishment of Everglades National Park and the 25th anniversary of the Convention in 1997, and (c) decides to retain the site on the List of World Heritage in Danger until further rehabilitation progress is demonstrated."

Decisions adopted by the Committee in 1996
20 BUR IV.7
Everglades National Park (United States of America)

The Bureau recalled that the site was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger in 1993 and that the World Heritage Committee at its last session examined a detailed monitoring report, presented by the State Party, which outlined the long­term restoration work necessary to restore the balance of the Everglades ecosystem. The State Party presented a preliminary monitoring report dated May 1996 outlining the Government's efforts to protect the site. The report acknowledges that despite significant progress made (acquisition of additional land, improved ecological indicators), the Park remains seriously in danger.

Due to the long-term nature of the rehabilitation activities and further to the conclusions of the Committee, the Bureau recommended that the site remain on the List of World Heritage in Danger until further rehabilitation is demonstrated.

20 COM VII.C.20/17
SOC: Everglades National Park (United States of America)

VII.20 Everglades National Park (United States of America)

The Committee recalled that the site was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger in 1993 and that at its last session, it examined the detailed monitoring report presented by the State Party, which outlined the precedent-setting long-term experimental restoration work necessary to restore the balance of the Everglades ecosystem. The State Party presented an interim monitoring report dated May 1996 outlining the Federal and State of Florida government's US$2 billion partnership efforts with the private sector to protect the World Heritage values of the site and that Everglades now has the largest science staff of any unit in the U.S. National Park System.

The Delegate of the United States of America informed the Committee that the President signed the Water Resources Development Act on 12 October 1996, which contains most of the components of the Everglades Restoration Plan. This includes the completion of a comprehensive plan to restore, preserve, and protect the South Florida ecosystem, a re-study of the water management system, an authority to design and construct projects that will accelerate the restoration effort, implementation of critical projects with funding of a total of US$ 75 million, strengthened partnership with the State of Florida and cost sharing of projects, establishment of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, full consultation of the public in the work of the Task Force, approval of US$ 12 million for the land acquisition, US$ 8 million for ecosystem research and US$ 2.8 million for the Shark River Slough restoration.

Despite significant progress made (acquisition of additional land, improved ecological indicators), the Park remains in danger.

Due to the long-term nature of the rehabilitation activities, the Committee (a) commended the State Party and the State of Florida and private sector partners for their extraordinary efforts to protect the World Heritage values of this site; (b) encouraged the State Party to consider sharing the knowledge and experience gained through this restorative effort in the rehabilitation of aquatic ecosystems with other State Parties with internationally significant wetlands, and (c) decided to retain the site on the List of World Heritage in Danger until further rehabilitation progress is demonstrated.

Report year: 1996
United States of America
Date of Inscription: 1979
Category: Natural
Criteria: (viii)(ix)(x)
Danger List (dates): 1993-2007, 2010-present
Exports

* : The threats indicated are listed in alphabetical order; their order does not constitute a classification according to the importance of their impact on the property.
Furthermore, they are presented irrespective of the type of threat faced by the property, i.e. with specific and proven imminent danger (“ascertained danger”) or with threats which could have deleterious effects on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (“potential danger”).

** : All mission reports are not always available electronically.


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