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Tasmanian Wilderness

Australia
Factors affecting the property in 1995*
  • Forestry /wood production
  • Ground transport infrastructure
Factors* affecting the property identified in previous reports
  • Potential construction of a dam (issue resolved)
  • Commercial logging in areas adjacent to the World Heritage property. 
International Assistance: requests for the property until 1995
Requests approved: 0
Total amount approved : 0 USD
Missions to the property until 1995**
Conservation issues presented to the World Heritage Committee in 1995

The Bureau at its nineteenth session recalled that this mixed site was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1982 and that the Bureau at its eighteenth session in July 1994, discussed reports received on logging operations in areas adjacent to the World Heritage area. The IUCN Representative gave an update on the situation and recalled two concerns which were raised: that there is forested land outside the site which may have World Heritage values, and logging and roading activities adjacent to the site could have an adverse impact on the existing World Heritage site. IUCN noted that both the 1990 and 1994 General Assemblies of IUCN had urged Australia to evaluate the World Heritage values of these areas and that recent concerns about the negative impact of forestry operations had been expressed by the Australian and New Zealand Committees for IUCN and the Wilderness Society (Tasmania).

The Director-General of IUCN wrote to the Australian Government in March 1995 seeking advice on this issue. A detailed reply was received from Senator Faulkner, Australian Minister for the Environment, dated 28 June 1995, stating the commitment of the Australian and Tasmanian Governments to protecting World Heritage values and to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the Tasmanian forests.

The Bureau noted concerns which have been expressed about logging and road construction in forest areas which may impinge on World Heritage values, and resolved to thank the Australian Minister for the Environment for his encouraging response. In particular the Bureau noted: (1) the commitment of both the Australian and Tasmanian Governments to negotiate a Regional Forest Agreement which would involve a comprehensive assessment of a wide range of values, including World Heritage values, for forested areas in Tasmania; (2) that, in the meantime, the two governments have agreed to avoid activities that may significantly affect those areas of the old-growth forest or wilderness that are likely-to have high conservation value; (3) that pending completion of a Regional Forest Assessment, the two governments have agreed to jointly undertake an assessment of those forest areas where commercial logging will be deferred, to allow among other things, an assessment of World Heritage values. The Bureau insisted that the integrity of the site be respected.

Furthermore, the authorities have provided information that negociations to alleviate possible impacts are still underway and a report may be available in time for the nineteenth session of the World Heritage Committee.

Analysis and Conclusion by World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in 1995

The Bureau may wish to take note of the action by the State Party to strengthen the protection of the site and may wish to make recommendations to the Committee depending upon the content of the full report, yet to be received.

Decisions adopted by the Committee in 1995
19 BUR VI.20
Tasmanian Wilderness (Australia)

The Bureau recalled that this mixed site was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1982 and that the Bureau at its eighteenth session in July 1994, discussed reports received on logging operations in areas adjacent to the World Heritage area. IUCN gave an update on the situation and recalled two concerns which were raised: that there is forested land outside the site which may have World Heritage values, and furthermore that adverse impact on the existing World Heritage site could result from logging and reading activities adjacent to the site. IUCN noted that both the 1990 and 1994 General Assemblies of IUCN had urgedAustralia to evaluate the World Heritage values of these areas and that recent concerns about the impacts of forestry operations had been expressed by the Australian and New Zealand Committees for IUCN and the Wilderness Society (Tasmania).

The Director-General of IUCN wrote to the Australian Government in March 1995 seeking advice on this issue. A detailed reply was received from Senator Faulkner, Australian Minister for the Environment, dated 28 June 1995, stating the commitment of the Australian and Tasmanian Governments to protecting World Heritage values and to undertake a comprehensive assessment of Tasmanian forests.

The Bureau noted concerns which have been expressed about logging and reading activities in forest areas which may impinge on World Heritage values in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage area, and resolved to thank the State Party for the encouraging response of the Australian Minister for the Environment. In particular the Bureau noted: (1) the commitment of both the Australian and Tasmanian Governments to negotiate a Regional Forest Agreement which would involve a comprehensive assessment of a wide range of values, including World Heritage values, for forested areas in Tasmania; (2) that, in the meantime, the two governments have agreed to avoid activities that may significantly affect those areas of the old-growth forest or wilderness that are likely to have high conservation value; (3) that pending completion of a Regional Forest Assessment, the two governments have agreed to jointly undertake an assessment of those forest areas where commercial logging will be deferred, to allow among other things, an assessment of World Heritage values. The Bureau asked to be kept informed of developments which should maintain the integrity of the existing site and may lead to the identification by the State Party of further World Heritage values, including possible additions to the boundaries of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage site.

ICOMOS stressed that as this was a mixed site all additional information concerning this site should be referred to ICOMOS as well as to IUCN.

19 COM VII.A.2.11
SOC: Tasmanian Wilderness (Australia)

VII.11 Tasmanian Wilderness (Australia)

The Committee recalled that this mixed site was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1982 and that the Bureau at its eighteenth session in July 1994, discussed reports received on logging operations in areas adjacent to the World Heritage area. It furthermore recalled that two concerns were raised: (a) that there is forested land outside the site which may have World Heritage values, and (b) that logging and roading activities adjacent to the site could have an adverse impact on the existing World Heritage site.

The Committee noted that the national authorities have provided information to the effect that negotiations to alleviate possible impacts are still underway.

The Committee took note of the action by the State Party to strengthen the protection of the site and that negotiations were still underway, and requested the Centre to contact the state Party to obtain a report on the situation as soon as possible.

The Bureau recommends the Committee to take note of the written information provided by the Secretariat and to adopt the following:

"The Committee, taking note of the action by the States Party to strengthen the protection of the site and that negotiations are still underway, requested the Centre to contact the States Party to obtain a report on the situation as soon as possible."

Report year: 1995
Australia
Date of Inscription: 1982
Category: Mixed
Criteria: (iii)(iv)(vi)(vii)(viii)(ix)(x)
Exports

* : The threats indicated are listed in alphabetical order; their order does not constitute a classification according to the importance of their impact on the property.
Furthermore, they are presented irrespective of the type of threat faced by the property, i.e. with specific and proven imminent danger (“ascertained danger”) or with threats which could have deleterious effects on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (“potential danger”).

** : All mission reports are not always available electronically.


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