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Dja Faunal Reserve

Cameroon
Factors affecting the property in 2010*
  • Commercial hunting
  • Illegal activities
  • Livestock farming / grazing of domesticated animals
  • Management systems/ management plan
  • Mining
Factors* affecting the property identified in previous reports

a) Lack of implementation and full approval of management plan;

b) Industrial mining activities proposed adjacent to the property;

c) Industrial farming proposed in the buffer zone;

d) Threats from commercial hunting; deforestation around the property.

UNESCO Extra-Budgetary Funds until 2010

Total amount provided to the property: USD 60,000 from the Netherlands Funds-in-Trust to UNESCO. The Dja Faunal Reserve benefited from part of the USD 193,275 in 2008 and a part of USD 118 725 in 2009, allocated within the framework of the Central Africa World Heritage Forest Initiative (CAWHFI) to the South-eastern Cameroon region. 

International Assistance: requests for the property until 2010
Requests approved: 4 (from 1987-1997)
Total amount approved : 84,700 USD
Missions to the property until 2010**

March 1998: UNESCO monitoring mission; June 2006: World Heritage Centre/IUCN reactive monitoring mission; December 2009: World Heritage Centre/IUCN reactive monitoring mission

Conservation issues presented to the World Heritage Committee in 2010

On 21 January 2010, the State Party transmitted a state of conservation report of the property containing the following information to the World Heritage Centre: progress in the implementation of the recommendations of the 2006 joint mission, progress in the implementation of the activities of the development plan for the property, a copy of the Decree N° 2007/10929 of 9 July 2007 concerning the establishment of the Dja Wildlife Reserve, and a copy of Decision 0330D/MINFOF/SG/DFAP of 29 April 2008 concerning the organization of the management of the Reserve. The report formulates several suggestions concerning mining activities by the GEOVIC Company and in particular with regard to the environmental impact study and management of the property. These State Party’ suggestions are as follows:

  • Conduct a new environmental impact study that takes into consideration the biodiversity plan based on the terms of reference updated and amended by all the stakeholders for the conservation of the Dja Biosphere Reserve;
  • Develop and sign a convention for collaboration between the MINFOF and the GEOVIC concerning the timber management resulting from clear-cutting;
  • Establish an item in the budget of the MINFOF reserved for the conservation of the World Heritage site;
  • Mobilise financial resources to enable concertation at all levels as foreseen by the development plan for the Biosphere Reserve;
  • Regularise the provisions of the organizational charts of the Conservation Services for Protected Areas and development plan;
  • Through the Conservation Service of the Dja Biosphere Reserve, and in cooperation with the UNESCO national representative, Cameroon should develop appropriate projects to submit to UNESCO for funding, particularly in the framework of protection, capacity building and ecodevelopment;
  • Involve local organizations in all the processes for biodiversity conservation in the Reserve and combat against poaching;
  • Notify UNESCO of any modification undertaken with regard to the zoning of the property.
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    Furthermore, the implementation of recommendations of the 2006 monitoring mission highlighted the following insufficiencies:

    • At the institutional level, the Dja management unit is not functional and effective, and still not financially autonomous for an efficient management of the property;
    • Concerning the combat against poaching: the measures undertaken are not sufficient to control this major pressure;
    • With regard to threats linked to agriculture and forestry, no recommendation has been implemented;
    • As regards mining or industrial farming: practically no recommendation has been implemented.
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      The main threats flagged by the State Party in this summary are: the starting up of activities by the GEOVIC mining company and the associated pollution risks, poaching, the exploitation of two timber sales, namely 10 02 192 and 10 02 193, granted in the eastern border of the property, that constitute a threat due to possible incursions in the property by contractors. These different threats will continue until such times as the management system of the property is improved.

      A joint UNESCO/IUCN monitoring mission on the state of conservation of the Dja Wildlife Reserve was carried out from 28 November to 5 December 2009. The objective of the mission was to evaluate the impact of current pressures on the property, as well as the mining project of the GEOVIC Company, in the periphery of the property. This monitoring mission enabled the evaluation of progress accomplished in the implementation of the recommendations of the 2006 mission carried out by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN. These recommendations concerned institutional organization, the anti-poaching combat system, agriculture, forestry and mining on the borders of the property.

      a) Imminent commencement of mining activities by the GEOVIC Company on the periphery of the property

      The World Heritage Centre and IUCN consider that real threats weigh on the Outstanding Universal Value and integrity of the property because of the imminent commencement of mining activities by the GEOVIC Company. Indeed, the mining company for cobalt and other minerals (GEOVIC Cameroon PLC) has obtained authorization to mine in an area of more than 150,000 ha, some forty kilometres east of the Reserve, since 2003. Currently, it has bases at Lomié and Kongo (total deforestation of 50 ha in progress). This implantation of the GEOVIC shall be accompanied progressively by a demographic explosion at the periphery of the property (nearly 700 jobs directly created, more than 2,000 persons expected) which could significantly increase commercial poaching to satisfy the high demand for bushmeat. Moreover, this mining operation could result in a heavy pollution of the DjaRiver that surrounds almost three-quarters of the property. In addition to having a negative impact on the Outstanding Universal Value of the property, this pollution could be a health hazard to local populations, and more particularly the Baka Pygmees.

      The World Heritage Centre and IUCN consider that a review of the Environmental Impact Study of the GEOVIC is indispensible as the one conducted in 2006 is no longer valid, even although it is currently being updated and revised by an impact study on the biodiversity. Thus, GEOVIC must provide a final technical feasibility study to learn the employed processes, the circulation routes for the minerals, the level of movement foreseen by the personnel, the investment plans and their chronology. An Environmental and Social Management Plan must also be proposed by GEOVIC to define how to reduce to a minimum the negative impacts of this mining project. The World Heritage Centre and IUCN also consider that the Outstanding Universal Value of the Dja Wildlife Reserve could be threatened in the very short-term if the impacts of the GEOVIC mining project are not controlled, and consider it urgent to halt the current work of GEOVIC, until the missing information on the evolution of the cobalt mining project is communicated to the World Heritage Centre.

      b) Increase of traditional and commercial poaching

      The World Heritage Centre and IUCN note the increase in poaching in the property, that concerns almost all the wildlife species (with a high proportion of small ungulates, primates and elephants), that has been confirmed by all the partners, including the local Dja NGO networks (ROLD). Patrol reports indicate a clear dimunition of wildlife in the central and southern parts of the Reserve. Different sources indicate a significant increase in the illegal trade of ivory. Traditional hunting that could have been considered as negligible over the past decades, could now become « critical » if the secular balance between adjacent populations and natural resources of the Reserve is upset. However, the local population has faith in its means of action (firearms), develops, and there is the increase in the reasons to hunt (to meet external demand). Commercial poaching depends largely on traditional hunting in the field. Increasing external demand for forest or wildlife products, without any relation to the supply capacity of the environment, is creating an imbalance locally.

      The mission considers that a national information campaign should be initiated as only a change in behaviour at the national level shall ensure the long-term safeguarding of the wildlife of Dja. The World Heritage Centre and IUCN encourage the State Party to undertake all the preventive measures to mitigate the increase in poaching in view of the foreseeable increase of the population at Lomié, linked to the implantation of the GEOVIC Company.

      c) Development of forestry exploitation and encroachment of agriculture in the periphery of the property

      Forestry exploitation is located along the border of the Reserve, notably in the eastern part. The mission noted that some licensees have no hesitation in prospecting in Dja taking advantage of the absence of formalised borders, the lack of control and the different ways of circumventing the laws. The mission also noted agricultural encroachment in places where the borders of the property are imprecise, notably on the northern border of the Reserve. This pressure is amplified by the hesitations of the administration to demarcate the possible extension areas for agriculture, and its tendency to back down in the face of the advance of the fields and clearings. Several commercial plantations are developing in the western periphery of the property.

      The World Heritage Centre and IUCN consider it important that forestry exploitation and commercial plantations are the subject of environmental impact studies and that monitoring indicators and control methods be developed for all the activities on the periphery of the property.

      d) Management of the property

      The World Heritage Centre and IUCN consider that the Dja Wildlife Reserve is greatly lacking as regards the management, planning, surveillance, ecological monitoring that does not target the principal values of the property. Indeed, the current management plan is hardly operational and has no set of action plans. Surveillance is not effective because of logistics inadapted to a forest zone where movement is very difficult (vehicles to the detriment of hiking equipment). The cooperative frameworks officially established for a co-management of the Reserve have never functioned and the local NGOs are not involved in the management of the property.

      The mission concluded that although the Dja Wildlife Reserve still retains the Outstanding Universal Value, its quantitative wealth in biodiversity has been eroded with an important decrease in the number of wildlife since its inscription on the World Heritage List. The critical threat to certain large wildlife species due to poaching could question, in the short-term, the justification for criterion (x). The pressure placed on certain non-ligneous resources and the rarity of certain species of mammals having an important role in the maintenance of the natural ecological processes, could also call into question criterion (ix). Moreover, the launching of the cobalt mining project in the periphery of the property, the direct and indirect negative impacts of which do not appear to have been fully considered, constitutes an important threat to the property’s integrity.

      However, the mission considered that the tendency of degradation of the Outstanding Universal Value could still be reversed if the Environmental and Social Management Plan enabling the mitigation of direct and indirect negative impacts of the mining project, and an emergency plan to strengthen management, are developed and implemented in the short term. These elements are contained in the draft decision.

      The World Heritage Centre and IUCN support the conclusion of the mission that considers that in the absence of a response, it is certain that the property would soon present criteria for inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger. 

Decisions adopted by the Committee in 2010
34 COM 7B.1
Dja Wildlife Reserve (Cameroon) (N 407)

The World Heritage Committee,

1. Having examined Document WHC-10/34.COM/7B,

2. Recalling Decisions 31 COM 7B.5 and 33 COM 7B.1, adopted respectively at its 31st (Christchurch, 2007) and 33rd (Seville, 2009) sessions,

3. Expresses its deep concern as regards the conclusions of the World Heritage Centre/IUCN mission that considers that the Outstanding Universal Value of the property is threatened by a progressive erosion of its biodiversity due to increased poaching, as well as by the negative impact of the commencement of mining activities of the GEOVIC Company, the development of forestry exploitation, and the encroachment of agriculture around the property;

4. Considers that in the absence of an urgent and decisive response in the face of these threats, it is certain that the property could meet the criteria for inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;

5. Requests the State Party to review the Environmental and Social Impact Study (ESIS) based on the final technical feasibility study prepared by the GEOVIC Company, and to submit an Environmental and Social Management Plan to mitigate the direct and indirect negative impacts of the mining project;

6. Calls upon the international community to assist the State Party with the review of the Environmental and Social Impact Study (ESIS);

7. Urges the State Party to suspend the implantation work for the GEOVIC mining activity until the conclusion of the new ESIS and also requests the State Party to control the validation of these documents by the different stakeholders and to inform the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2010;

8. Further requests the State Party to develop and implement an emergency plan before the 36th session of the World Heritage Committee, based on the management plan with the following objectives:

a) Improve the operational organization of the Reserve and strengthen the supervisory and surveillance personnel,

b) Focus the management of the property on the Outstanding Universal Value and establish a systematic monitoring mechanism on the pressures and threats,

c) Strengthen the controlling power of the ecoguards and limit the traditional use of natural resources by the local populations,

d) Strengthen the level of protection in the Reserve by transforming it, if possible, into a national park and taking into account its uses by the indigenous populations,

e) Reenergize the consultation frameworks with the local NGOs and other concerned stakeholders,

f) Clearly re-establish the boundaries of the property based on controllable axes such as the Dja River, or the recognized circulation routes,

g) Propose a suitable budget for the implementation of these priorities,

h) Define a monitoring-evaluation framework that includes pertinent indicators on wildlife and ensure the collection of historic and updated data;

9. Requests furthermore the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN monitoring mission to the property in 2011 to evaluate the implementation of the recommendations of the 2009 mission and the progression of the threats, notably the mining and industrial agriculture projects;

10. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2011, a report on the state of conservation of the property, and on the steps taken for the implementation of the recommendations of the 2009 World Heritage Centre/IUCN mission, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 35th session in 2011, with a view, in the absence of substantial progress, to considering the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.

Draft Decision: 34 COM 7B.1

The World Heritage Committee,

1. Having examined Document WHC-10/34.COM/7B,

2. Recalling Decisions 31COM 7B.5 and 33 COM 7B.1, adopted respectively at its 31st (Christchurch, 2007) and 33rd (Seville, 2009) sessions,

3. Expresses its deep concern as regards the conclusions of the World Heritage Centre/IUCN mission that considers that the Outstanding Universal Value of the property is threatened by a progressive erosion of its biodiversity due to increased poaching, as well as by the negative impact of the commencement of mining activities of the GEOVIC Company, the development of forestry exploitation, and the encroachment of agriculture around the property;

4. Considers that in the absence of an urgent and decisive response in the face of these threats, it is certain that the property could shortly respond to criteria for inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;

5. Requests the State Party to review the Environmental and Social Impact Study (ESIS) based on the final technical feasibility study prepared by the GEOVIC Company, and to submit an Environmental and Social Management Plan to mitigate the direct and indirect negative impacts of the mining project;

6. Strongly urges the State Party to suspend the implantation work for the GEOVIC mining activity until the conclusion of the new ESIS and also requests the State Party to control the validation of these documents by the different stakeholders and to inform the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2010;

7. Further requests the State Party to develop and implement an emergency plan before the 36th session of the World Heritage Committee, based on the management plan with the following objectives:

a) Improve the operational organization of the Reserve and strengthen the supervisory and surveillance personnel,

b) Focus the management of the property on the Outstanding Universal Value and establish a systematic monitoring mechanism on the pressures and threats,

c) Strengthen the controlling power of the ecoguards and limit the traditional use of natural resources by the local populations,

d) Strengthen the level of protection in the Reserve by transforming it, if possible, into a national park and taking into account its uses by the indigenous populations,

e) Reenergize the consultation frameworks with the local NGOs and other concerned stakeholders,

f) Clearly re-establish the boundaries of the property based on controllable axes such as the DjaRiver, or the recognized circulation routes,

g) Propose a suitable budget for the implementation of these priorities,

h) Define a monitoring-evaluation framework that includes pertinent indicators on wildlife and ensure the collection of historic and updated data;

8. Requests furthermore the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN monitoring mission to the property in 2011 to evaluate the implementation of the recommendations of the 2009 mission and the progression of the threats, notably the mining and industrial agriculture projects;

9. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2011, a report on the state of conservation of the property, and on the steps taken for the implementation of the recommendations of the 2009 World Heritage Centre/IUCN mission, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 35th session in 2011, with a view, in the absence of substantial progress, to considering the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.  

Report year: 2010
Cameroon
Date of Inscription: 1987
Category: Natural
Criteria: (ix)(x)
Documents examined by the Committee
arrow_circle_right 34COM (2010)
Exports

* : The threats indicated are listed in alphabetical order; their order does not constitute a classification according to the importance of their impact on the property.
Furthermore, they are presented irrespective of the type of threat faced by the property, i.e. with specific and proven imminent danger (“ascertained danger”) or with threats which could have deleterious effects on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (“potential danger”).

** : All mission reports are not always available electronically.


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