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Tipasa

Algeria
Factors affecting the property in 2002*
  • Financial resources
  • Housing
  • Human resources
  • Impacts of tourism / visitor / recreation
  • Management activities
  • Management systems/ management plan
  • Other Threats:

    Deterioration of the archaeological vestiges

Factors* affecting the property identified in previous reports
  • Earthquake (issue resolved)
  • Lack of implementation of the Permanent Safeguarding and Presentation Plan
International Assistance: requests for the property until 2002
Requests approved: 6 (from 1989-2001)
Total amount approved : 75,900 USD
Missions to the property until 2002**

July 1989: UNESCO expert mission; December 1989: UNESCO mission; March-April 1990: expert mission; October 1992: expert mission; February 2002: World Heritage Centre experts mission

Conservation issues presented to the World Heritage Committee in 2002

In June 2001, the Bureau approved a request for emergency assistance and recommended that the State Party implement without delay the 1992 Permanent Safeguarding and Presentation Plan to reduce pressure on the site, keep the World Heritage Centre informed on all projects relating to the site, and to submit all studies to the Centre for approval prior to their implementation.

In the framework of this emergency assistance, the Centre sent in February 2002 a 2-member mission to Tipasa to evaluate the state of conservation, to study visitor impact and to propose corrective measures.

The mission noted that, in spite of remarkable efforts on the part of the conservation team working at the site, no new measure had been undertaken to reduce pressure on the site and most of the monuments and vestiges are in a precarious and dangerous state of conservation. More specifically, the following problems were identified:

1. Anthropic degradation due to serious acts of vandalism (destruction, theft, rubbish, etc.), increased urbanization in the vicinity of the site and in the buffer zone, continual legal disputes concerning real estate with owners or public or private contractors.

2. Natural degradation caused by sea salt and wind eroding the littoral, and vegetation.

 

The archaeological site

The situation is characterized by the non-respect of the non-aedificandi and non altius-tollendi zone, real estate disputes concerning the lighthouse, the port and the area situated to the east and west, unsuitable restoration techniques, (use of cement), open sewage canals leading from the colonial town and crossing the site to the sea, uncontrolled vegetation development with roots that are seriously damaging the archaeological vestiges, the non-existence of a landscape development programme and study of plantations to reduce the effects of the north and north-west winds on the archaeological structures, outdated signposting, ground lighting, trails, insufficient surveillance, and finally heavy human encroachment with constructions built within the site.

 

The colonial town

The 1992 Permanent Safeguarding and Presentation Plan concerns this town, which was entirely built in what is considered as the buffer zone, and its ongoing development that is detrimental to the antique site. The present two urban planning instruments (Area Plan - POS, and Town Development Plan - PDAU) exercise pressure on the site, as they do not take into consideration the specificities for its conservation nor its boundaries or buffer zone.

Conservation services

One of the major problems of the site stems from its very weak service capacities that are seriously lacking in qualified staff and material and financial means. Furthermore, they are unable to prevent the daily infringement of the different public agents who intervene at the site and its surroundings without any prior consultation with site officials.

In short, this situation where the boundaries and the buffer zone are not defined, the physical and visual integrity of the site is impaired, and even the authenticity is threatened, has led the two experts to question the need to include Tipasa in the List of World Heritage in Danger. Moreover, it is recalled that the Periodic Report received in 2000 and signed by the competent authorities had already clearly expressed the request to include Tipasa in the List of World Heritage in Danger.

 

At the time of this report and in view of the above, the World Heritage Centre is in contact with the Algerian authorities and is discussing what actions need to be undertaken. 

Decisions adopted by the Committee in 2002
26 COM 21B.34
Archaeological site of Tipasa (Algeria)
The World Heritage Committee,

1. Expresses strong concern with regard to the situation incompatible with maintaining the outstanding universal values of the site, which had justified its inscription on the World Heritage List;

2. Invites the World Heritage Centre to send a new mission to Tipasa, to discuss with the State Party immediate safeguarding measures to be undertaken and to halt all on-going or future actions that might affect the integrity of the site and its buffer zone;  

3. Recommends that the Centre assist the State Party in preparing and implementing a remedial plan for the site, including visitor management and public-awareness programmess, linking the site and its environment;

4. Requests the World Heritage Centre to submit a report on this site for examination by the Committee at its 27th session in June/July 2003;

5. Decides to inscribe the Archaeological Site of Tipasa on the List of World Heritage in Danger.

26 COM 23.23
New Inscriptions on the List of World Heritage in Danger
The World Heritage Committee,

Recalls its decision to inscribe the following properties on the List of World Heritage in Danger: 

1. Archaeological Site of Tipasa, Algeria (26 COM 21 (b) 34);

2. Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam, Afghanistan (26 COM 23.3)

The Committee may wish to adopt the following decision:

 

“The Committee expresses strong concern with regard to the incompatible situation in maintaining the outstanding universal values of the site, which had justified its inscription on the World Heritage List.

Consequently, the Committee decides to inscribe the Archaeological Site of Tipasa on the List of World Heritage in Danger. 

The World Heritage Committee invites the World Heritage Centre to send a new mission to Tipasa, to discuss with the State Party immediate safeguarding measures to be undertaken and to halt all on-going or future actions which might affect the integrity of the site and its buffer zone.  The Committee requests the World Heritage Centre to submit a report to the 27th session of its Bureau in April 2003."

Report year: 2002
Algeria
Date of Inscription: 1982
Category: Cultural
Criteria: (iii)(iv)
Danger List (dates): 2002-2006
Documents examined by the Committee
arrow_circle_right 26COM (2002)
Exports

* : The threats indicated are listed in alphabetical order; their order does not constitute a classification according to the importance of their impact on the property.
Furthermore, they are presented irrespective of the type of threat faced by the property, i.e. with specific and proven imminent danger (“ascertained danger”) or with threats which could have deleterious effects on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (“potential danger”).

** : All mission reports are not always available electronically.


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