Faites une recherche à travers les informations du Centre du patrimoine mondial.

Promoting climate change adaptation and mitigation in Lamu Old Town (Kenya)  

Lamu Old Town faces multiple threats from climate change, energy needs and rapid social and economic transformation. The Lamu Old town management plan and the Lamu Municipality Waste Management Policy focused on integrating physical, social and environmental solutions with traditional practices that could help in building resilience towards disasters, including those induced by climate change.

About Lamu Old Town

The Old Town of Lamu is located on an island by the same name within the Lamu Archipelago on the northern Kenyan Coast. The Old Town occupies approximately 16 hectares and consists of a buffer zone of approximately 1200 hectares, covering part of the Indian Ocean waters and the Manda Island skyline to guarantee the site's authenticity. Lamu Island has a population of approximately 25,000, of which 15,000 are residents within the Old Town and its environments (Census, 2009).

"Lamu Old Town is the oldest and best-preserved Swahili settlement in East Africa, retaining its traditional functions. Built-in coral stone and mangrove timber, the town is characterised by the simplicity of structural form features such as inner courtyards, verandas, and elaborately carved wooden doors. Lamu has hosted major Muslim religious festivals since the 19th century and has become a significant centre for the study of Islamic and Swahili cultures"

Lamu stands out as the pre-eminent surviving model of the medieval Swahili city-states. Buildings are mostly constructed of local building materials such as quick lime for mortar and finishes, hardwood (Terminalia) for structural/slab support, and the unique interior design of buildings, which are more inward-looking. The town exhibits a unique urban plan with a labyrinth of narrow streets, traditional architectural designs, intricately carved timber doors and an unperturbed traditional way of life. The town evolved as one of the earliest seaports of call in East Africa and became an important trading point on the famous Indian Ocean trade route. The cultural influences from the latter’s interactions can still be experienced in the building technology, maritime activities, cuisine and customary practices. Lamu Old Town was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2001 under Criteria II, IV, and VI.

Management framework

The National Museums of Kenya established the Lamu World Heritage Site and Conservation Office, which has operated since 1986. A conservation officer is seconded to Lamu County Council for advice on conservation matters. A planning commission has existed since 1991 to play a supervisory role and address emerging issues in the conservation area. There exists a conservation plan for Lamu Old Town, which is used as a guide in balancing the community’s needs for development and sustaining the architectural values of the town. A draft management plan has been developed that intends to address issues such as the mushrooming of informal settlements in the setting of the property, encroachment and illegal development on the dunes water catchment area, the proposed port and cruise ship berth, and oil exploration. The plan also aims to strengthen the inter-ministerial relationships to enhance an integrated management approach, including the establishment of a conservation fund, for sustainable conservation and management of the property.

Between 2011 and 2020, several State of Conservation reports were presented to the World Heritage Committee, and Reactive Monitoring missions were carried out in 2010, 2015, and 2019. According to the recent mission’s report, the threats that could have an impact on the integrity of the property included but were not limited to pressure from urban development, transport infrastructure, encroachment of the archaeological sites, non-renewable energy facilities (Coal Power plant), and intensified water shortages, as a result of the Lamu Port-South Sudan-Ethiopia Transport (LAPSSET) project. In 2019, the World Heritage Committee affirmed that the lack of significant progress in the implementation of the recommendations made by the Committee and the reactive monitoring mission in 2019 would lead to considering the possibility of inscribing the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger  (Decision 43 COM 7B.6).

In response to the Committee’s decision, the State Conservation report (2020) highlighted several measures that were realised; for example, the work on the Lamu Coal Plant was put on hold. In addition, the LAPSSET, an ongoing project with detailed plan components which are being developed individually by the relevant line ministries along with the necessary Environmental and Heritage Impact Assessments (EIAs/HIAs), is being reviewed. The National Museums of Kenya (NMK) has been included in the technical committee for the LAPSSET Master Plan. The Lamu Heritage Committee action plan will be revised and aligned with the reviewed Management plan.

The World Heritage Committee, in (Decision 44 COM 7B.6), noted that “the work on the Lamu Coal Plant is on hold and requested as well that alternative solutions be proposed to meet the electricity needs of the region”. The decision also underlined the utmost need to clarify the boundaries of the buffer zone, including all of Lamu Island, parts of Manda Island, and relevant mangrove belts in the area. Additionally, the Committee requested the State Party to conduct a condition survey of the world heritage site and encouraged finalising the revision of the Management plan.

According to the site manager, other threats affecting Lamu Old Town include rapid social and economic transformation:

  • Modern lifestyle changes have increased demand for contemporary domestic utilities such as water-borne sanitary appliances. This has seen a massive conversion of traditional pit latrines into septic tanks to serve newly installed flush toilets, presenting concerns for its potential to contaminate groundwater and local wells. Adopting new water-borne utilities has also led to an over-extraction of water from local wells using mechanical pumps, which diminishes water columns in the wells.

  • In addition, consumption of newly manufactured commodities, especially those from plastics, has been on a steady increase, replacing locally produced organic products. This, coupled with poor waste management strategies, has resulted in environmental pollution from the plastic waste within the heritage site. Plastic pollution has been exacerbated by the abandonment of local products made from organic materials and ignoring practical solutions that are sensitive to the environment, such as the use of reusable water containers, straw baskets for shopping instead of polythene bags and locally produced cotton face masks instead of disposable ones.

  • Electrical reticulation within the Old Town has been poorly conceived and poses a hazard. Over the past decade, Lamu has experienced an increase in bulk supply and storage of liquid petroleum gas that is increasingly being adopted as an alternative for domestic use. However, the bulk storage facilities are located within densely populated areas and with little safety measures in place. This presents a potential threat to the built heritage in the event of a fire disaster, which could also significantly impact the marine environment.

Climate-related impacts

Lamu Old Town, due to its location on a sandy island, is especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change, in particular rising sea levels. Furthermore, the existing vulnerabilities of the electric, waste management and sanitation infrastructure could exacerbate the negative impacts of flooding.

Lamu Old Town has, over the last decade, experienced an inordinate spring tide causing the periodic flooding of the seafront street. The spring tide overflows at various points along the waterfront, and the water is adversely affecting the buildings through capillary action and erosion. The volume of water that comes over the wall is knee-high. The destruction of mangroves in some areas, which used to serve as a natural defence against strong winds, tsunamis and advancing waves, has exacerbated these risks.

Traditional knowledge and practices

Lamu Old Town was founded on a gently rising dune, ensuring that stormwater was naturally drained towards the sea. Its thoroughfares are aligned to the prevailing seasonal winds and daily sea breezes, allowing the natural cooling of the town. The narrow streets formed by nearby buildings ensure the streets are shaded for most of the day, providing cool temperatures at street level. The building technology of thick walls and floors also enhances the hygrothermal comfort of the stone structures.

The mangrove forest on Manda and the islets within the Lamu harbour act as a natural defence against strong winds, tsunamis and advancing waves. Knowledge of weather patterns, sea movement and naturally safe areas during adverse atmospheric conditions, accumulated by local fishermen, farmers, and sailors over the centuries, provides important information which enhances the community's resilience during extreme weather or disasters.

Climate action solutions and strategies

Addressing challenges

Lamu Old Town is considering a number of opportunities to resolve the threats posed by climate change, energy needs and modern lifestyle changes.

  1. Climate change mitigation
  • Plastic waste: Local communities, with the assistance of state and non-state institutions, are undertaking recycling programmes using plastic and discarded metal objects. This is proving to be a practical long-term solution in reducing the volume of waste that cannot be adequately locally incinerated, thus reducing harmful emissions such as carbon monoxide through partial combustion. The Municipal authority has also invested in mechanical means of removal of rubbish from the Old Town.
  • New streetlights: The Lamu Municipality has introduced solar-powered streetlights as a sustainable means for capitalising on renewable energy.
  1. Climate change adaptation
      • Monitoring of the periodic flooding of the seafront street: The site manager continues to monitor the volume of water annually.
      • Protection of native mangroves: The mangrove forests provide natural protection for the town against advancing waves and possible tsunamis. The mangroves are protected as the natural setting of the town and form part of the gazetted Manda – Kitau skyline.
      • Engaging local communities in documentation and mapping of indigenous knowledge: Traditional knowledge systems help build resilience towards disasters, including those induced by climate change. It also provides practical, effective solutions for identification, response, and recovery from the effects of adverse weather and other natural phenomena. In January 2022, the Kenyan National Commission for UNESCO conducted a community empowerment workshop with the support of the UNESCO Participation Programme. Enabling youth to identify and document this body of knowledge ensures its continuity and widespread use by current and future generations.

The community participants were eventually assisted in forming a community responders association which will henceforth work with the authorities in sensitizing the community on disasters also be the led agencies in responding to any kind of catastrophes. © National Museums of Kenya, June 2021.

 A number of ruins in Shanga and Siyu are currently covered by light forest. The National Musem of Kenya (NMK) is seeking ways of opening up the site for visitors in collaboration with local communities. © National Museums of Kenya, Fort Jesus World Heritage Site and Lamu Museums, July 2021.

Climate Action and Disaster Risk Management in Kenya (CDARM-K) Team members leading community members in tree planting in order to create a natural barrier against strong winds and errant waves. © National Museums of Kenya, Fort Jesus World Heritage Site and Lamu Museums, July 2021.

Participants receives instructions on the edifications of attribute relating to built heritage, assessment of vulnerability and risks processes in the development of disaster risk management and how to respond on emergency cases. © National Museums of Kenya, June 2021.

Safeguarding Lamu’s Source of Drinking Water

The availability of fresh water is credited for the over 700 years of human habitation on Lamu island. Recent construction activities within the catchment areas bordering the Shela beaches threatened this vital water source. Local communities, in collaboration with state agencies, waged a strong objection to these activities with the support of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre. The protests waged by the communities against developments on the water Management Authority as one of the best examples of community-led protection of water catchment have gained national prominence and been adopted by the Water Resource aquifers in the country.

The site management authority also depends on working closely with stakeholders to address the site’s challenges. This includes hosting regular meetings with local communities; formal working relationships with the Lamu Water Users Association to assist in monitoring the sand dunes; establishing the Lamu Cultural Heritage Committee to develop action plans; and training local stakeholders on community-based adaptation and alternative livelihoods.

Group Photo community volunteers from Siyu, Mshundwani and Shanga village taken 8th December 2020 © National Museums of Kenya, Fort Jesus World Heritage Site and Lamu Museums, July 2021.


Sources:

  • Contribution by Mohammed Ali Mwenje, curator, National Museums of Kenya.
  • World Heritage Cities Programme, World Heritage City Lab (16-17 December 2021), Historic Cities, Climate Change, Water, and Energy Report on the 10th Anniversary of the Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape. 
  • World Heritage Committee, Decision 43 COM 7B. 107 (2020), State of Conservation report. https://whc.unesco.org/document/180836
  • World Heritage Committee, 43rd session (2019). Document WHC/19/43.COM/7B.Add.  https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/174159
  • World Heritage Committee, Decision 44 COM 7B.6 (2021), Document WHC/21/44.COM/7B.Add https://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/188005
  • Lamu Port-South Sudan-Ethiopia Transport (LAPSSET) Corridor Development Authority - Building Transformative and Game Changer Infrastructure for a Seamless Connected Africa, https://www.lapsset.go.ke/
  • Publication: “Climate change in Lamu Old Town” p.95-99

Contribution towards global goals

How does this case study contribute to the global commitments of sustainable development, climate change action and heritage conservation?

© Erik (HASH) Hersman, CC BY-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Sustainable development

The initiative aims to contribute towards sustainable development by addressing the following Sustainable Development Goals:

Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Target 6.3 The initiative aimed to improve water quality by reducing pollution and by undertaking recycling programmes using plastic and discarded metal objects.

Target 6.b: the initiative aimed to support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management through effective collaboration of local communities with government agencies, with the support of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre against construction in the watershed area, which was recognised by the Water Resources Management Authority as one of best examples of community-led aquifers protection in the country.

Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Target 7.1: the initiative aimed to improve general access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services by the replacement of charcoal and firewood burning by LPG for domestic use.

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Target 11.4 the initiative aimed to strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage by addressing the threats posed by climate change and more to the World Heritage property and developing the Lamu Old Town Management Plan

Target 11.6 the initiative aimed to reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of Lamu, by paying special attention to municipal and other waste management by developing the Lamu Municipality Waste Management Policy and promoting recycling.

Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Target 13.2 the initiative aimed to integrate climate change measures into local policies, strategies, and planning.

Target 13.3 the initiative aimed to improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning by engaging local communities in documentation and mapping of indigenous knowledge.

Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Target 17.17: the project aims to involve and promote public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships. 

Climate change

Stronger spring tides, periodic flooding, the vulnerability of infrastructures and waste management.

Traditional knowledge on weather patterns, sea movement and naturally safe areas during adverse atmospheric conditions, accumulated by local fishermen, farmers, and sailors over the centuries, provides important information which enhances the community’s resilience during extreme weather or disasters. Planning on the dune promotes natural draining towards the sea. Traditional building thick walls and floors also increase the hydrothermal comfort of stone structures. The mangrove forests provide natural protection for the town against advancing waves and tsunamis.

Climate change mitigation:
  • Buse, community recycling programmes, and improving waste management.

Climate change adaptation:

  • Monitoring of the flooding,
  • Protection and regeneration of mangroves,
  • Engaging local communities in the documentation and mapping of indigenous knowledge,
  • Developing the Lamu Island Structure Plan, the Lamu Old Town Management Plan and the Lamu Municipality Waste Management Policy with a focus on integrating physical, social and environmental considerations that can promote ecologically sensitive practices and solutions integrated with heritage management frameworks.  


Historic Urban Landscape

The project aims to contribute to the implementation of the 2011 Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape approach by:

  • Taking a heritage-based approach to infrastructure development that minimises its negative impact on the heritage of the city
  • Integrating HUL tools in its broader context into management plans developed at the site level for the identification and preservation of urban heritage
  • Promoting sustainable urban water practices
  • Strengthening close collaboration between site management authority, state agencies and the local community to address the challenges facing the site
  • Engaging local communities in the documentation and mapping of indigenous knowledge
  • Providing training to local stakeholders on community-based adaptation and alternative livelihoods
Regulatory Systems Civic engagement Knowledge and planning tools

Learn more

Discover more about the details of the case study and the stakeholders involved.

© Cessna 206, CC BY-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
To learn more
Contact

Mr Mohammed Ali Mwenje, Heritage Inspector - Lamu World Heritage Site National Museums of Kenya


Credits

© UNESCO, 2023. Project team: Jyoti Hosagrahar, Muhammad Juma Muhammad, Carlota Marijuan Rodriguez, Altynay Dyussekova and Mirna Ashraf Ali.  
Cover image: © Folkloreltd, via Wikimedia Commons.


Note: The cases shared in this platform address heritage protection practices in World Heritage sites and beyond. Items being showcased on this website do not entail any type of recognition or inclusion in the World Heritage list or any of its thematic programmes. The practices shared are not assessed in any way by the World Heritage Centre or presented here as model practices, nor do they represent complete solutions to heritage management problems. The views expressed by experts and site managers are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the World Heritage Centre. The practices and views shared here are included as a way to provide insights and expand the dialogue on heritage conservation with a view to further urban heritage management practice in general. The described potential impacts of the initiative are only indicative and based on submitted and available information. UNESCO does not endorse the specific initiatives nor ratifies their positive impact.

Décisions / Résolutions (3)
Code : 44COM 7B.6

Le Comité du patrimoine mondial,

  1. Ayant examiné le document WHC/21/44.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Rappelant les décisions 42 COM 7B.45 et 43 COM 7B.107, adoptées respectivement à ses 42e (Manama, 2018) et 43e (Bakou, 2019) sessions,
  3. Adresse ses remerciements à l'État partie pour l'organisation d'une mission de suivi réactif sur le territoire du bien en novembre/décembre 2019, compte tenu des problèmes de sécurité, et demande que l'État partie mette en œuvre les recommandations de la mission ;
  4. Souligne l'extrême urgence de clarifier les limites du bien et de mettre en place une zone tampon élargie pour inclure toute l'île de Lamu, certaines parties de l'île de Manda et les ceintures de mangroves concernées dans la zone, comme demandé à de nombreuses reprises dans le passé, et demande également qu'une carte actualisée délimitant clairement le bien et sa zone tampon élargie soit soumise au Centre du patrimoine mondial et aux Organisations consultatives pour commentaires, avant de la soumettre officiellement au Comité du patrimoine mondial en tant que modification mineure des limites, conformément au paragraphe 164 des Orientations ;
  5. Exprime sa préoccupation quant à l'état général de conservation des bâtiments sur le territoire du bien et demande en outre à l'État partie d'achever l'étude du parc immobilier et de renforcer l'application des contrôles de construction afin de mettre un terme à la détérioration et à l'utilisation de matériaux inappropriés ;
  6. Regrette qu'un plan de gestion révisé prenant en considération le projet de transport Port Lamu-Sud Soudan-Éthiopie (LAPSSET) n'ait pas encore été achevé et prie instamment l’État Partie de l’achever dès que possible et de le soumettre au Centre du patrimoine mondial pour examen par les Organisations consultatives ;
  7. Prend acte de l’intégration des Musées nationaux du Kenya (NMK) dans le Comité technique du plan directeur du LAPSSET, mais prie aussi instamment l'État partie de veiller à ce qu'un protocole d'accord entre les NMK et l'Autorité de développement du corridor du LAPSSET soit conclu afin de garantir que les NMK ont un rôle dans les décisions susceptibles de porter atteinte au patrimoine le long du corridor, et en particulier à la valeur universelle exceptionnelle (VUE) des biens du patrimoine mondial concernés, y compris Vieille ville de Lamu ;
  8. Prend note de la nécessité d’une plus grande sensibilisation aux menaces potentielles du projet LAPSSET sur la VUE du bien, tant au niveau politique que de la société civile, et demande en outre à l'État partie de :
    1. Envoyer une délégation gouvernementale de haut niveau, comprenant des représentants du ministère des Sports, de la Culture et du Patrimoine et des NMK, sur le territoire du bien pour évaluer l'ensemble des défis et l'urgence de trouver des solutions afin d’assurer la sauvegarde de la VUE du bien,
    2. Créer une « équipe spéciale du patrimoine » composée d'agences gouvernementales compétentes tant au niveau national que local, avec le soutien et la participation de la société civile, afin d'élaborer des réponses appropriées aux nombreuses questions d’aménagement et de développement susceptibles de porter atteinte à la VUE du bien,
    3. Créer un forum des parties prenantes et de la communauté pour l’île de Lamu, qui puisse également travailler en étroite collaboration avec le projet LAPSSET,
    4. Mettre en place un programme central de responsabilité sociale des entreprises en collaboration avec l'Autorité de développement du corridor du LAPSSET et le gouvernement du comté afin de s'assurer que des fonds suffisants sont disponibles pour la conservation du bien et les projets liés au patrimoine ;
  9. Demande par ailleurs à l’État Partie de :
    1. Achever, dès que possible, le travail de révision de l'évaluation environnementale stratégique (EES) du projet LAPSSET, en prenant en considération les impacts individuels et cumulatifs que le projet et tous ses sous-projets peuvent avoir sur la VUE du bien, ainsi que sur le bien du patrimoine mondial du lac Turkana, et en veillant à qu'aucune autre composante du projet LAPSSET ne soit mise en œuvre avant que l'EES ne soit achevée et soumise au Centre du patrimoine mondial pour examen par les Organisations consultatives ;
    2. Communiquer au Centre du patrimoine mondial, pour chaque sous-projet du projet LAPSSET (ville touristique, aéroport international, etc.), des informations exhaustives sur les projets et leurs plans, avec les évaluations d’impact environnemental et sur le patrimoine (EIE/EIP), pour examen par les Organisations consultatives avant que tout décision irréversible ne soit prise quant à leur mise en œuvre ;
  10. Note que le projet de centrale électrique au charbon de Lamu est suspendu, et demande de plus que des solutions alternatives soient proposées pour répondre aux besoins en électricité de la région et que tout projet d'aménagement et de développement dans ce domaine fasse l'objet d'EIE/EIP indépendantes approfondies pour s'assurer de l’absence d'impact négatif sur la VUE du bien ;
  11. Demande d’autre part à l'État partie d'inviter une mission conjointe de suivi réactif Centre du patrimoine mondial/ICOMOS/ICCROM à se rendre sur le territoire du bien au cours du premier semestre 2023 afin d’examiner les progrès réalisés dans la prise en compte des recommandations de la mission de 2019 et des décisions du Comité du patrimoine mondial, pour examen par le Comité du patrimoine mondial à sa 46e session ;
  12. Demande enfin à l’État partie de soumettre au Centre du patrimoine mondial, d’ici le 1erfévrier 2022, un rapport d’avancement, et d’ici le 1er décembre 2022, un rapport actualisé sur l’état de conservation du bien et sur la mise en œuvre des points ci-dessus mentionnés, pour examen par le Comité du patrimoine mondial à sa 46e

En savoir plus sur la décision
Code : 43COM 7B.6

Le Comité du patrimoine mondial,

  1. Ayant examiné le document WHC/19/43.COM/7B,
  2. Rappelant la décision 39 COM 7B.10, adoptée à sa 39e session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Accueille favorablement les efforts déployés actuellement par l’État partie pour gérer des impacts sur le bien, y compris au travers de la démolition de structures illégales à l’intérieur du bien, et l’élaboration de plans pour traiter systématiquement des décisions du Comité ;
  4. Prend note des mesures positives rapportées, mises en œuvre pour minimiser l’impact des infrastructures de tourisme, télécabines, escaliers, chemins de fer électriques, à l’intérieur du bien, et de la confirmation de l’État partie qu’aucun projet semblable n’a été développé, cependant note avec préoccupation que d’autres projets d’infrastructure semblent avoir été approuvés et demande à l’État partie de fournir de plus amples informations sur ces projets et leur impact potentiel sur la valeur universelle exceptionnelle (VUE) du bien, conformément au paragraphe 172 des Orientations avant que ne soit prise toute décision sur laquelle il serait difficile de revenir ;
  5. Note également avec préoccupation que, bien que le rapport de l’État partie indique qu’aucune nouvelle route n’a été construite à l’intérieur du bien et que l’aménagement de route à l’extérieur du bien n’a pas d’impact sur sa VUE, la construction de routes continuera d’être autorisée en principe, et invite de nouveau l’État partie à veiller à ce qu’aucun aménagement de nouvelle route ne soit permis à l’intérieur du bien ;
  6. Regrette que l’État partie n’ait pas soumis le plan général de la Région d'intérêt panoramique et historique de Wulingyuan (2005-2020) et demande également à l’État partie de soumette le projet de plan révisé au Centre du patrimoine mondial pour examen, dès qu’il sera disponible ;
  7. Prend également note des mesures prises par l’État partie pour élaborer une stratégie de tourisme durable pour le bien, du fait que la fréquentation continue d’augmenter et que les limites de capacité d’accueil seront révisées avec le plan global, et demande en outre à l’État partie de finaliser la stratégie de développement durable du tourisme de Wulingyuan, conformément à d’autres documents de gestion, et de soumettre un projet au Centre du patrimoine mondial, pour examen dès que possible ;
  8. Note les efforts déployés pour s’engager de manière positive avec des communautés locales au cours des programmes de déménagement et demande par ailleurs à l’État partie de s’assurer que tout programme de ce type soit conforme au document de politique 2015 sur l’intégration d’une perspective de développement durable dans les processus de la Convention et assure une consultation efficace, une indemnisation juste, un accès aux avantages sociaux et à la formation professionnelle, et la préservation de droits culturels;
  9. Demande finalement à l’État partie de soumettre au Centre du patrimoine mondial, d’ici le 1er décembre 2020, un rapport actualisé sur l’état de conservation du bien et sur la mise en œuvre des points ci-dessus mentionnés, pour examen par le Comité du patrimoine mondial à sa 45e session en 2021.

En savoir plus sur la décision
Code : 43COM 7B.107

Le Comité du patrimoine mondial,

  1. Ayant examiné le document WHC/19/43.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Rappelant les décisions 27 COM 7B.31, 33 COM 7B.44, 34 COM 7B.46, 40 COM 7B.12, 41 COM 7B.69, et 42 COM 7B.45 adoptées respectivement à ses 27e(UNESCO, 2003), 33e (Séville, 2009), 34e (Brasilia, 2010), 40e (Istanbul/UNESCO, 2016), 41e (Cracovie, 2017) et 42e (Manama, 2018) sessions,
  3. Regrette que l’État partie ne fournisse que des informations limitées sur l’état de conservation du bien et réitère sa demande à l’État partie de soumettre d’urgence au Centre du patrimoine mondial pour examen par les Organisations consultatives :
    1. Une carte mise à jour et clairement délimitée du bien et de sa zone tampon élargie, qui devrait être formalisée par une demande de modification mineure des limites, conformément au paragraphe 164 des Orientations,
    2. Tous les détails du périmètre global du projet de transport Port de Lamu–Soudan du Sud–Éthiopie (LAPSSET), y compris la ville touristique de Lamu, la clarification des plans de pêche, de la plantation de mangroves ainsi que les études sur la morphologie côtière,
    3. L’évaluation d’impact sur le patrimoine (EIP) demandée pour l’extension de l’aéroport de Manda,
    4. Le cadre de planification et d’investissement du LAPSSET,
    5. Le plan d’action du Comité du patrimoine culturel de la vieille ville de Lamu avec des délais stricts pour tous les éléments qui y sont définis,
    6. Le plan de gestion révisé de l’île de Lamu ;
  4. Demande à l’État partie de soumettre une évaluation de l’état du tissu bâti de la vieille ville de Lamu, y compris, dans la mesure du possible, une vue d’ensemble de son évolution depuis l’inscription du bien sur la Liste du patrimoine mondial ;
  5. Prie instamment l’État partie de finaliser le protocole d’accord (MOU) entre les Musées nationaux du Kenya (NMK) et l’agence LAPSSET, de veiller à ce que ce MOU accorde aux NMK un siège au conseil de l’agence LAPSSET et de soumettre le MOU au Centre du patrimoine mondial une fois finalisé ;
  6. Demande également à l’État partie d’entreprendre un examen des évaluations d’impact sur l’environnement et le patrimoine du projet LAPSSET et du plan de centrale au charbon de Lamu, que ces évaluations soient gouvernementales ou indépendantes, et de le soumettre au Centre du patrimoine mondial dès que possible d’ici le 1er février 2020 ;
  7. Demande en outre à l’État partie de réviser le projet d’évaluation environnementale stratégique (EES) du projet LAPSSET en :  
    1. Évaluant les impacts individuels et cumulatifs du projet sur le patrimoine culturel et naturel, y compris les impacts sur la valeur universelle exceptionnelle (VUE) de la vieille ville de Lamu et les services écologiques qui soutiennent la communauté élargie du bien, et en proposant des mesures d’atténuation,
    2. Appliquant de manière urgente les décisions de justice du Tribunal environnemental national du 26 juin 2019 nNET 196[1] de 2016 concernant le développement du projet Lamu Coal qui exigent que l’État partie conduise une nouvelle évaluation d’impact environnemental,
    3. Alignant, le cas échéant, l’EES du projet LAPSSET et l’EES des aménagements dans le bassin du lac Turkana afin d’évaluer tous les impacts directs, indirects et cumulatifs potentiels des projets d’aménagement sur la VUE de tous les biens du patrimoine mondial concernés ;
  8. Demande en outre à l’État partie de soumettre au Centre du patrimoine mondial une EES révisée concernant le projet LAPSSET, une évaluation d’impact sur le patrimoine et une évaluation d’impact environnemental du projet de centrale à charbon de Lamu prenant en compte les impacts sur la valeur universelle exceptionnelle de la vielle ville de Lamu ainsi que les autres documents demandés ci-dessus, avant de mettre à exécution le projet de centrale à charbon de Lamu ;
  9. Suite à l’approbation du Département de la sûreté et de la sécurité des Nations Unies (UNDSS), demande de plus à l’État partie d’inviter la mission de suivi réactif conjointe Centre du patrimoine mondial/ICOMOS/ICCROM sur le bien pour étudier le processus et les conclusions des diverses évaluations d’impact sur l’environnement et le patrimoine, les processus de participation des parties prenantes et l’état de conservation du bien ;
  10. Encourage l’État partie, selon les besoins, à demander un soutien technique et/ou financier au Fonds du patrimoine mondial, à d’autres États parties à la Convention du patrimoine mondial ou à d’autres donateurs ou partenaires potentiels pour finaliser le plan de gestion, délimiter les limites du bien et sa zone tampon, et évaluer l’état de conservation du tissu bâti du bien ;
  11. Demande finalement à l’État partie de soumettre au Centre du patrimoine mondial, d’ici le 1er février 2020, un rapport sur l’état de conservation du bien et la mise en œuvre des recommandations susmentionnées, pour examen par le Comité du patrimoine mondial à sa 44e session en 2020, afin de considérer, dans le cas de la confirmation d’un péril potentiel ou prouvé pour la VUE, et conformément au paragraphe 179 des Orientations, l’inscription éventuelle du bien sur la Liste du patrimoine mondial en péril.

[1] Voir http://kenyalaw.org/caselaw/cases/view/176697/

En savoir plus sur la décision
top