WHC/2/Revised
                                                 February 1995








            UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC
                   AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION





        INTERGOVERNMENTAL COMMITTEE FOR THE PROTECTION
          OF THE WORLD CULTURAL AND NATURAL HERITAGE







         Operational Guidelines for the Implementation
               of the World Heritage Convention


                       TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                Paragraph Nos.

INTRODUCTION                                               1-5

I.   ESTABLISHMENT OF THE WORLD HERITAGE LIST
 
     A.   General Principles                                 6

     B.   Indications to States Parties concerning
          nominations to the List                         7-22

     C.   Criteria for the inclusion of cultural
          properties in the World Heritage List          23-42

     D.   Criteria for the inclusion of natural
          properties in the World Heritage List          43-47

     E.   Procedure for the eventual deletion of
          properties from the World Heritage List        48-58

     F.   Guidelines for the evaluation and examination
          of nominations                                 59-64

     G.   Format and content of nominations                 65

     H.   Procedure and timetable for the processing
          of nominations                                 66-68

II.  MONITORING THE STATE OF CONSERVATION OF
     PROPERTIES INSCRIBED ON THE WORLD HERITAGE LIST        69

     A.   Systematic monitoring and reporting            70-75

     B.   Reactive monitoring                               76

III. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE LIST OF WORLD HERITAGE
     IN DANGER

     A.   Guidelines for the inclusion of properties
          in the List of World Heritage in Danger           77

     B.   Criteria for the inclusion of properties
          in the List of World Heritage in Danger        78-82

     C.   Procedure for the inclusion of properties
          in the List of World Heritage in Danger        83-90


IV.  INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE      

     A.   Different forms of assistance available 
          under the World Heritage Fund

                              (i)
                                                Paragraph Nos.


          (i)   Preparatory assistance                   91-92
          (ii)  Emergency assistance                     93-94
          (iii) Training                                 95-99
          (iv)  Technical co-operation                 100-108
          (v)   Assistance for promotional activities      109
                         
     B.   Order of priorities for the granting of
          international assistance                     110-113

     C.   Agreement to be concluded with States
          receiving international assistance           114-116

     D.   Implementation of projects                       117

     E.   Conditions for the granting of 
          international assistance                         118


V.   WORLD HERITAGE FUND                               119-121


VI.  BALANCE BETWEEN THE CULTURAL AND THE NATURAL
     HERITAGE IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CONVENTION      122
     

VII. OTHER MATTERS

     A.   Use of the World Heritage Emblem and the     123-126
          name, symbol or depiction of World Heritage  
          sites

     B.   Production of plaques to commemorate the     127-129
          inclusion of properties in the World Heritage 
          List

     C.   Rules of Procedure of the Committee              130

     D.   Meetings of the World Heritage Committee     131-132

     E.   Meetings of the Bureau of the World Heritage
          Committee                                        133

     F.   Participation of experts from developed      134-135
          countries                                           

     G.   Publications of the World Heritage List      136-137

     H.   Action at the national level to promote a
          greater awareness of the activities 
          undertaken under the Convention              138-139

     I.   Links with other Conventions and                 140
          Recommendations   

                             (ii)
INTRODUCTION


1.   The cultural heritage and the natural heritage are among the
priceless and irreplaceable possessions, not only of each nation,
but of mankind as a whole. The loss, through deterioration or
disappearance, of any of these most prized possessions
constitutes an impoverishment of the heritage of all the peoples
in the world. Parts of that heritage, because of their
exceptional qualities, can be considered to be of outstanding
universal value and as such worthy of special protection against
the dangers which increasingly threaten them.

2.   In an attempt to remedy this perilous situation and to
ensure, as far as possible, the proper identification,
protection, conservation and presentation of the world's
irreplaceable heritage, the Member States of UNESCO adopted in
1972 the Convention concerning the Protection of the World
Cultural and Natural Heritage, hereinafter referred to as "the
Convention". The Convention complements heritage conservation
programmes at the national level and provides for the
establishment of a "World Heritage Committee" and a "World
Heritage Fund". Both the Committee and the Fund have been in
operation since 1976.

3.   The World Heritage Committee, hereinafter referred to as
"the Committee", has four essential functions:

     (i)  to identify, on the basis of nominations submitted by
          States Parties, cultural and natural properties of
          outstanding universal value which are to be protected
          under the Convention and to list those properties on
          the "World Heritage List";

     (ii) monitor the state of conservation of properties
          inscribed on the World Heritage List.   

    (iii) to decide in case of urgent need which properties
          included in the World Heritage List are to be
          inscribed on the "List of World Heritage in Danger"
          ((only properties which require for their conservation
          major operations and for which assistance has been
          requested under the Convention can be considered));

     (iv) to determine in what way and under what conditions the
          resources in the World Heritage Fund can most
          advantageously be used to assist States Parties, as
          far as possible, in the Protection of their properties
          of outstanding universal value.

4.   The Operational Guidelines which are set out below have been
prepared for the purpose of informing States Parties to the
Convention of the principles which guide the work of the
Committee in establishing the World Heritage List and the List
of World Heritage in Danger and in granting international
assistance under the World Heritage Fund. These Guidelines also
provide details on monitoring and other questions, mainly of a
procedural nature, which relate to the implementation of the
Convention.

5.   The Committee is fully aware that its decisions must be
based on considerations which are as objective and scientific as
possible, and that any appraisal made on its behalf must be
thoroughly and responsibly carried out. It recognizes that
objective and well considered decisions depend upon:

     -    carefully prepared criteria,
     -    thorough procedures,
     -    evaluation by qualified experts and the use of expert
          referees.

The Operational Guidelines have been prepared with these
objectives in mind.


I.   ESTABLISHMENT OF THE WORLD HERITAGE LIST

A.   General Principles

6.   The Committee agreed that the following general principles
would guide its work in establishing the World Heritage List:

     (i)  The Convention provides for the protection of those
          cultural and natural properties deemed to be of
          outstanding universal value. It is not intended to
          provide for the protection of all properties of great
          interest, importance or value, but only for a select
          list of the most outstanding of these from an
          international viewpoint. The outstanding universal
          value of cultural and natural properties is defined by
          Articles 1 and 2 of the Convention. These definitions
          are interpreted by the Committee by using two sets of
          criteria: one set for cultural property and another
          set for natural property. The criteria and the
          conditions of authenticity or integrity adopted by the
          Committee for this purpose are set out in paragraphs
          24 and 47 below.

     (ii) The criteria for the inclusion of properties in the
          World Heritage List have been elaborated to enable the
          Committee to act with full independence in evaluating
          the intrinsic merit of property, without regard to any
          other consideration (including the need for technical
          co-operation support).


   (iii)  Efforts will be made to maintain a reasonable balance
          between the numbers of cultural heritage and the
          natural heritage properties entered on the List.

     (iv) Cultural and natural properties are included in the
          World Heritage List according to a gradual process and
          no formal limit is imposed either on the total number
          of properties included in the List or on the number of
          properties any individual State can submit at
          successive stages for inclusion therein. 

     (v)  Inscriptions of sites shall be deferred until evidence
          of the full commitment of the nominating government,
          within its means, is demonstrated.  Evidence would
          take the forms of relevant legislation, staffing,
          funding, and management plans, as described below in
          Paragraph 24 (b) (ii) for cultural properties, and in
          Paragraph 44 (b) (vi) for natural properties.

     (vi) When a property has deteriorated to the extent that it
          has lost those characteristics which determined its
          inclusion in the World Heritage List.  It should be
          placed on the World Heritage in Danger List,
          subsequently the procedure concerning the possible
          deletion from the List will be applied. This procedure
          is set out in paragraphs 48 to 56 below.

   (vii)  In view of the difficulty in handling the large
          numbers of cultural nominations now being received,
          however, the Committee invites States Parties to
          consider whether their cultural heritage is already
          well represented on the List and if so to slow down
          voluntarily their rate of submission of further
          nominations. This would help in making it possible for
          the List to become more universally representative. By
          the same token, the Committee calls on States Parties
          whose cultural heritage is not yet adequately
          represented on the List and who might need assistance
          in preparing nominations of cultural properties to
          seek such assistance from the Committee.


B.   Indications to States Parties concerning nominations to the
     List

7.   The Committee requests each State Party to submit to it a
tentative list of properties which it intends to nominate for
inscription to the World Heritage List during the following five
to ten years. This tentative list will constitute the "inventory"
(provided for in Article 11 of the Convention) of the cultural
and natural properties situated within the territory of each
State Party and which it considers suitable for inclusion in the
World Heritage List. The purpose of these tentative lists is to
enable the Committee to evaluate within the widest possible
context the "outstanding universal value" of each property
nominated to the List. The Committee hopes that States Parties
that have not yet submitted a tentative list will do so as early
as possible. States Parties are reminded of the Committee's
earlier decision not to consider cultural nominations unless such
a list of cultural properties has been submitted.

8.   In order to facilitate the work of all concerned, the
Committee requests States Parties to submit their tentative lists
in a standard format (see Annex 1) which provides for information
under the following headings:

     -    the name of the property;

     -    the geographical location of the property;

     -    a brief description of the property;

     -    a justification of the "outstanding universal value"
          of the property in accordance with the criteria and
          conditions of authenticity or integrity set out in
          paragraphs 24 and 44 below, taking account of similar
          properties both inside and outside the boundaries of
          the State concerned.

Natural properties should be grouped according to biogeographical
provinces and cultural properties should be grouped according to
cultural periods or areas. The order in which the properties
listed would be presented for inscription should also be
indicated, if possible.

9.   The fundamental principle stipulated in the Convention is
that properties nominated must be of outstanding universal value
and the properties nominated therefore should be carefully
selected. The criteria and conditions of authenticity or
integrity against which the Committee will evaluate properties
are set out in paragraphs 24 and 44 below. Within a given
geo-cultural region, it may be desirable for States Parties to
make comparative assessments for the harmonization of tentative
lists and nominations of cultural properties. Support for the
organization of meetings for this purpose may be requested under
the World Heritage Fund.

10.  Each nomination should be presented in the form of a
well-argued case. It should be submitted on the appropriate form
(see paragraph 65 below) and should provide all the information
to demonstrate that the property nominated is truly of
"outstanding universal value". Each nomination should be
supported by all the necessary documentation, including suitable
slides and maps and other material. With regard to cultural
properties, States Parties are invited to attach to the
nomination forms a brief analysis of references in world
literature (e.g. reference works such as general or specialized
encyclopaedias, histories of art or architecture, records of
voyages and explorations, scientific reports, guidebooks, etc.)
along with a comprehensive bibliography. With regard to
newly-discovered properties, evidence of the attention which the
discovery has received internationally would be equally helpful.

11.  Under the "Juridical data" section of the nomination form
States Parties should provide, in addition to the legal texts
protecting the property being nominated, an explanation of the
way in which these laws actually operate. Such an analysis is
preferable to a mere enumeration or compilation of the legal
texts themselves.

12.  When nominating properties belonging to certain
well-represented categories of cultural property the nominating
State Party should provide a comparative evaluation of the
property in relation to other properties of a similar type, as
already required in paragraph 7 with regard to the tentative
lists.

13.  In certain cases it may be necessary for States Parties to
consult the Secretariat and the specialized NGO concerned
informally before submitting nomination forms. The Committee
reminds States Parties that assistance for the purpose of
preparing comprehensive and sound nominations is available to
them at their request under the World Heritage Fund.

14.  In all cases, so as to maintain the objectivity of the
evaluation process and to avoid possible embarrassment to those
concerned, States Parties should refrain from giving undue
publicity to the fact that a property has been nominated for
inscription pending the final decision of the Committee on the
nomination in question.  Participation of local people in the
nomination process is essential to make them feel a shared
responsibility with the State Party in the maintenance of the
site, but should not prejudice future decision-making by the
Committee.

15.  In nominating properties to the List, States Parties are
invited to keep in mind the desirability of achieving a
reasonable balance between the numbers of cultural heritage and
natural heritage properties included in the World Heritage List.

16.  In cases where a cultural and/or natural property which
fulfils the criteria adopted by the Committee extends beyond
national borders the States Parties concerned are encouraged to
submit a joint nomination.

17.  Whenever necessary for the proper conservation of a cultural
or natural property nominated, an adequate "buffer zone" around
a property should be provided and should be afforded the
necessary protection. A buffer zone can be defined as an area
surrounding the property which has restrictions placed on its use
to give an added layer of protection; the area constituting the
buffer zone should be determined in each case through technical
studies. Details on the size, characteristics and authorized uses
of a buffer zone, as well as a map indicating its precise
boundaries, should be provided in the nomination file relating
to the property in question.

18.  In keeping with the spirit of the Convention, States Parties
should as far as possible endeavour to include in their
submissions properties which derive their outstanding universal
value from a particularly significant combination of cultural and
natural features.

19.  States Parties may propose in a single nomination a series
of cultural or natural properties in different geographical
locations, provided that they are related because they belong to:

     (i)  the same historico-cultural group or

     (ii) the same type of property which is characteristic of
          the geographical zone

   (iii)  the same geomorphological formation, the same
          biogeographic province, or the same ecosystem type

and provided that it is the series as such, and not its
components taken individually, which is of outstanding universal
value.

20.  When a series of cultural or natural properties, as defined
in paragraph 19 above, consists of properties situated in the
territory of more than one State Party to the Convention, the
States Parties concerned are encouraged to jointly submit a
single nomination.

21.  States Parties are encouraged to prepare plans for the
management of each natural site nominated and for the
safeguarding of each cultural property nominated. All information
concerning these plans should be made available when technical
co-operation is requested.

22.  Where the intrinsic qualities of a property nominated are
threatened by action of man and yet meet the criteria and the
conditions of authenticity or integrity set out in paragraphs 24
and 44, an action plan outlining the corrective measures required
should be submitted with the nomination file. Should the
corrective measures submitted by the nominating State not be
taken within the time proposed by the State, the property will
be considered by the Committee for delisting in accordance with
the procedure adopted by the Committee.

C.   Criteria for the inclusion of cultural properties in the
     World Heritage List

23.  The criteria for the inclusion of cultural properties in the
World Heritage List should always be seen in relation to one
another and should be considered in the context of the definition
set out in Article 1 of the Convention which is reproduced below:

     "monuments: architectural works, works of monumental
     sculpture and painting, elements or structures of an
     archaeological nature, inscriptions, cave dwellings and
     combinations of features, which are of outstanding
     universal value from the point of view of history, art or
     science;

     groups of buildings: groups of separate or connected
     buildings which, because of their architecture, their
     homogeneity or their place in the landscape, are of
     outstanding universal value from the point of view of
     history, art or science;

     sites: works of man or the combined works of nature and of
     man, and areas including archaeological sites which are of
     outstanding universal value from the historical, aesthetic,
     ethnological or anthropological points of view."

24.  A monument, group of buildings or site - as defined above
- which is nominated for inclusion in the World Heritage List
will be considered to be of outstanding universal value for the
purpose of the Convention when the Committee finds that it meets
one or more of the following criteria and the test of
authenticity.  Each property nominated should therefore:

     (a) (i)   represent a masterpiece of human creative genius;
               or

        (ii)   exhibit an important interchange of human values,
               over a span of time or within a cultural area of
               the world, on developments in architecture,
               monumental arts or town-planning and landscape
               design; or

       (iii)   bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony
               to a cultural tradition or to a civilization
               which is living or which has disappeared; or

        (iv)   be an outstanding example of a type of building
               or architectural ensemble or landscape which
               illustrates (a) significant stage(s) in human
               history; or

         (v)   be an outstanding example of a traditional human
               settlement or land-use which is representative of
               a culture (or cultures), especially when it has
               become vulnerable under the impact of
               irreversible change; or

        (vi)   be directly or tangibly associated with events or
               living traditions, with ideas, or with beliefs,
               with artistic and literary works of outstanding
               universal significance (the Committee considers
               that this criterion should justify inclusion in
               the List only in exceptional circumstances or in
               conjunction with other criteria cultural or
               natural);

                              and

     (b) (i)   meet the test of authenticity in design,
               material, workmanship or setting and in the case
               of cultural landscapes their distinctive
               character and components (the Committee stressed
               that reconstruction is only acceptable if it is
               carried out on the basis of complete and detailed
               documentation on the original and to no extent on
               conjecture).

        (ii)   have adequate legal and/or traditional protection
               and management mechanisms to ensure the
               conservation of the nominated cultural property
               or cultural landscapes. The existence of
               protective legislation at the national,
               provincial or municipal level or well-established
               traditional protection and/or adequate management
               mechanisms is therefore essential and must be
               stated clearly on the nomination form. Assurances
               of the effective implementation of these laws
               and/or management mechanisms are also expected.
               Furthermore, in order to preserve the integrity
               of cultural sites, particularly those open to
               large numbers of visitors, the State Party
               concerned should be able to provide evidence of
               suitable administrative arrangements to cover the
               management of the property, its conservation and
               its accessibility to the public.

25.  Nominations of immovable property which are likely to become
movable will not be considered.

26.  With respect to groups of urban buildings, the Committee has
furthermore adopted the following Guidelines concerning their
inclusion in the World Heritage List.

27.  Groups of urban buildings eligible for inclusion in the
World Heritage List fall into three main categories, namely:

     (i)  towns which are no longer inhabited but which provide
          unchanged archaeological evidence of the past; these
          generally satisfy the criterion of authenticity and
          their state of conservation can be relatively easily
          controlled;

     (ii) historic towns which are still inhabited and which, by
          their very nature, have developed and will continue to
          develop under the influence of socio-economic and
          cultural change, a situation that renders the
          assessment of their authenticity more difficult and
          any conservation policy more problematical;

    (iii) new towns of the twentieth century which paradoxically
          have something in common with both the aforementioned
          categories: while their original urban organization is
          clearly recognizable and their authenticity is
          undeniable, their future is unclear because their
          development is largely uncontrollable.

28.  The evaluation of towns that are no longer inhabited does
not raise any special difficulties other than those related to
archaeological sites in general: the criteria which call for
uniqueness or exemplary character have led to the choice of
groups of buildings noteworthy for their purity of style, for the
concentrations of monuments they contain and sometimes for their
important historical associations. It is important for urban
archaeological sites to be listed as integral units. A cluster
of monuments or a small group of buildings is not adequate to
suggest the multiple and complex functions of a city which has
disappeared; remains of such a city should be preserved in their
entirety together with their natural surroundings whenever
possible.

29.  In the case of inhabited historic towns the difficulties are
numerous, largely owing to the fragility of their urban fabric
(which has in many cases been seriously disrupted since the
advent of the industrial era) and the runaway speed with which
their surroundings have been urbanized. To qualify for inclusion,
towns should compel recognition because of their architectural
interest and should not be considered only on the intellectual
grounds of the role they may have played in the past or their
value as historical symbols under criterion (vi) for the
inclusion of cultural properties in the World Heritage List (see
paragraph 24 above). To be eligible for inclusion in the List,
the spatial organization, structure, materials, forms and, where
possible, functions of a group of buildings should essentially
reflect the civilization or succession of civilizations which
have prompted the nomination of the property. Four categories can
be distinguished:

  (i)     Towns which are typical of a specific period or
          culture, which have been almost wholly preserved and
          which have remained largely unaffected by subsequent
          developments. Here the property to be listed is the
          entire town together with its surroundings, which must
          also be protected;

  (ii)    Towns that have evolved along characteristic lines and
          have preserved, sometimes in the midst of exceptional
          natural surroundings, spatial arrangements and
          structures that are typical of the successive stages
          in their history. Here the clearly defined historic
          part takes precedence over the contemporary
          environment;

  (iii)   "Historic centres" that cover exactly the same area as
          ancient towns and are now enclosed within modern
          cities. Here it is necessary to determine the precise
          limits of the property in its widest historical
          dimensions and to make appropriate provision for its
          immediate surroundings;

  (iv)    Sectors, areas or isolated units which, even in the
          residual state in which they have survived, provide
          coherent evidence of the character of a historic town
          which has disappeared. In such cases surviving areas
          and buildings should bear sufficient testimony to the
          former whole.

30.  Historic centres and historic areas should be listed only
where they contain a large number of ancient buildings of
monumental importance which provide a direct indication of the
characteristic features of a town of exceptional interest.
Nominations of several isolated and unrelated buildings which
allegedly represent, in themselves, a town whose urban fabric has
ceased to be discernible, should not be encouraged.

31.  However, nominations could be made regarding properties that
occupy a limited space but have had a major influence on the
history of town planning. In such cases, the nomination should
make it clear that it is the monumental group that is to be
listed and that the town is mentioned only incidentally as the
place where the property is located. Similarly, if a building of
clearly universal significance is located in severely degraded
or insufficiently representative urban surroundings, it should,
of course, be listed without any special reference to the town.

32.  It is difficult to assess the quality of new towns of the
twentieth century. History alone will tell which of them will
best serve as examples of contemporary town planning. The
examination of the files on these towns should be deferred, save
under exceptional circumstances.

33.  Under present conditions, preference should be given to the
inclusion in the World Heritage List of small or medium-sized
urban areas which are in a position to manage any potential
growth, rather than the great metropolises, on which sufficiently
complete information and documentation cannot readily be provided
that would serve as a satisfactory basis for their inclusion in
their entirety.  

34.  In view of the effects which the entry of a town in the
World Heritage List could have on its future, such entries should
be exceptional. Inclusion in the List implies that legislative
and administrative measures have already been taken to ensure the
protection of the group of buildings and its environment.
Informed awareness on the part of the population concerned,
without whose active participation any conservation scheme would
be impractical, is also essential.

35.  With respect to cultural landscapes, the Committee has
furthermore adopted the following guidelines concerning their
inclusion in the World Heritage List.

36.  Cultural landscapes represent the "combined works of nature
and of man" designated in Article 1 of the Convention.  They are
illustrative of the evolution of human society and settlement
over time, under the influence of the physical constraints and/or
opportunities presented by their natural environment and of
successive social, economic and cultural forces, both external
and internal.  They should be selected on the basis both of their
outstanding universal value and of their representativity in
terms of a clearly defined geo-cultural region and also for their
capacity to illustrate the essential and distinct cultural
elements of such regions.

37.  The term "cultural landscape" embraces a diversity of
manifestations of the interaction between humankind and its
natural environment.

38.  Cultural landscapes often reflect specific techniques of
sustainable land-use, considering the characteristics and limits
of the natural environment they are established in, and a
specific spiritual relation to nature.  Protection of cultural
landscapes can contribute to modern techniques of sustainable
land-use and can maintain or enhance natural values in the
landscape.  The continued existence of traditional forms of
land-use supports biological diversity in many regions of the
world.  The protection of traditional cultural landscapes is
therefore helpful in maintaining biological diversity.

39.  Cultural landscapes fall into three main categories, namely:

     (i)  The most easily identifiable is the clearly defined
          landscape designed and created intentionally by man. 
          This embraces garden and parkland landscapes
          constructed for aesthetic reasons which are often (but
          not always) associated with religious or other
          monumental buildings and ensembles.

     (ii) The second category is the organically evolved
          landscape.  This results from an initial social,
          economic, administrative, and/or religious imperative
          and has developed its present form by association with
          and in response to its natural environment.  Such
          landscapes reflect that process of evolution in their
          form and component features.  They fall into two
          sub-categories:

          -    a relict (or fossil) landscape is one in which an
               evolutionary process came to an end at some time
               in the past, either abruptly or over a period. 
               Its significant distinguishing features are,
               however, still visible in material form.

          -    a continuing landscape is one which retains an
               active social role in contemporary society
               closely associated with the traditional way of
               life, and in which the evolutionary process is
               still in progress.  At the same time it exhibits
               significant material evidence of its evolution
               over time.

    (iii) The final category is the associative cultural
          landscape.  The inclusion of such landscapes on the
          World Heritage List is justifiable by virtue of the
          powerful religious, artistic or cultural associations
          of the natural element rather than  material cultural
          evidence, which may be insignificant or even absent.

40.  The extent of a cultural landscape for inclusion on the
World Heritage List is relative to its functionality and
intelligibility.  In any case, the sample selected must be
substantial enough to adequately represent the totality of the
cultural landscape that it illustrates.  The possibility of
designating long linear areas which represent culturally
significant transport and communication networks should not be
excluded.

41.  The general criteria for conservation and management laid
down in paragraph 24.(b).(ii) above are equally applicable to
cultural landscapes.  It is important that due attention be paid
to the full range of values represented in the landscape, both
cultural and natural.  The nominations should be prepared in
collaboration with and the full approval of local communities.

42.  The existence of a category of "cultural landscape",
included on the World Heritage List on the basis of the criteria
set out in paragraph 24 above, does not exclude the possibility
of sites of exceptional importance in relation to both cultural
and natural criteria continuing to be included.  In such cases,
their outstanding universal significance must be justified under
both sets of criteria.


D.   Criteria for the inclusion of natural properties in the
     World Heritage List

43.  In accordance with Article 2 of the Convention, the
following is considered as "natural heritage":

     "natural features consisting of physical and biological
     formations or groups of such formations, which are of
     outstanding universal value from the aesthetic or
     scientific point of view;

     geological and physiographical formations and precisely
     delineated areas which constitute the habitat of threatened
     species of animals and plants of outstanding universal
     value from the point of view of science or conservation;

     natural sites or precisely delineated natural areas of
     outstanding universal value from the point of view of
     science, conservation or natural beauty."

44.  A natural heritage property - as defined above - which is
submitted for inclusion in the World Heritage List will be
considered to be of outstanding universal value for the purposes
of the Convention when the Committee finds that it meets one or
more of the following criteria and fulfils the conditions of
integrity set out below. Sites nominated should therefore:

     (a) (i)   be outstanding examples representing major stages
               of earth's history, including the record of life,
               significant on-going geological processes in the
               development of landforms, or significant
               geomorphic or physiographic features; or

        (ii)   be outstanding examples representing significant
               on-going ecological and biological processes in
               the evolution and development of terrestrial,
               fresh water, coastal and marine ecosystems and
               communities of plants and animals; or

       (iii)   contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of
               exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic
               importance; or

        (iv)   contain the most important and significant
               natural habitats for in-situ conservation of
               biological diversity, including those containing
               threatened species of outstanding universal value
               from the point of view of science or
               conservation;

                              and

     (b)  also fulfil the following conditions of integrity:

          (i)  The sites described in 44(a)(i) should contain
               all or most of the key interrelated and
               interdependent elements in their natural
               relationships; for example, an "ice age" area
               should include the snow field, the glacier itself
               and samples of cutting patterns, deposition and
               colonization (e.g. striations, moraines, pioneer
               stages of plant succession, etc.); in the case of
               volcanoes, the magmatic series should be complete
               and all or most of the varieties of effusive
               rocks and types of eruptions be represented.

         (ii)  The sites described in 44(a)(ii) should have
               sufficient size and contain the necessary
               elements to demonstrate the key aspects of
               processes that are essential for the long-term
               conservation of the ecosystems and the biological
               diversity they contain; for example, an area of
               tropical rain forest should include a certain
               amount of variation in elevation above sea-level,
               changes in topography and soil types, patch
               systems and naturally regenerating patches;
               similarly a coral reef should include, for
               example, seagrass, mangrove or other adjacent
               ecosystems that regulate nutrient and sediment
               inputs into the reef.

        (iii)  The sites described in 44(a)(iii) should be of
               outstanding aesthetic value and include areas
               that are essential for maintaining the beauty of
               the site; for example, a site whose scenic values
               depend on a waterfall, should include adjacent
               catchment and downstream areas that are
               integrally linked to the maintenance of the
               aesthetic qualities of the site.

         (iv)  The sites described in paragraph 44(a)(iv) should
               contain habitats for maintaining the most diverse
               fauna and flora characteristic  of the biographic
               province and ecosystems under consideration; for
               example, a tropical savannah should include a
               complete assemblage of co-evolved herbivores and
               plants; an island ecosystem should include
               habitats for maintaining endemic biota; a site
               containing wide-ranging species should be large
               enough to include the most critical habitats
               essential to ensure the survival of viable
               populations of those species; for an area
               containing migratory species, seasonal breeding
               and nesting sites, and migratory routes, wherever
               they are located, should be adequately protected;
               international conventions, e.g. the Convention of
               Wetlands of International Importance Especially
               as Waterfowl Habitat (Ramsar Convention), for
               ensuring the protection of habitats of migratory
               species of waterfowl, and other multi- and
               bilateral agreements could provide this
               assurance.

          (v)  The sites described in paragraph 44(a) should
               have a management plan.  When a site does not
               have a management plan at the time when it is
               nominated for the consideration of the World
               Heritage Committee, the State Party concerned
               should indicate when such a plan will become
               available and how it proposes to mobilize the
               resources required for the preparation and
               implementation of the plan.  The State Party
               should also provide other document(s) (e.g.
               operational plans) which will guide the
               management of the site until such time when a
               management plan is finalized.

         (vi)  A site described in paragraph 44(a) should have
               adequate long-term legislative, regulatory or
               institutional protection. The boundaries of that
               site should reflect the spatial requirements of
               habitats, species, processes or phenomena that
               provide the basis for its nomination for
               inscription on the World Heritage List.  The
               boundaries should include sufficient areas
               immediately adjacent to the area of outstanding
               universal value in order to protect the site's
               heritage values from direct effects of human
               encroachment and impacts of resource use outside
               of the nominated area.  The boundaries of the
               nominated site may coincide with one or more
               existing or proposed protected areas, such as
               national parks or biosphere reserves.  While an
               existing or proposed protected area may contain
               several management zones, only some of those
               zones may satisfy criteria described in paragraph
               44(a); other zones, although they may not meet
               the criteria set out in paragraph 44(a), may be
               essential for the management to ensure the
               integrity of the nominated site; for example, in
               the case of a biosphere reserve, only the core
               zone may meet the criteria and the conditions of
               integrity, although other zones, i.e. buffer and
               transitional zones, would be important for the
               conservation of the biosphere reserve in its
               totality.

        (vii)  Sites described in paragraph 44(a) should be the
               most important sites for the conservation of
               biological diversity.  Biological diversity,
               according to the new global Convention on
               Biological Diversity , means the variability
               among living organisms in terrestrial, marine and
               other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological
               complexes of which they are part and includes
               diversity within species, between species and of
               ecosystems.  Only those sites which are the most
               biologically diverse are likely to meet criterion
               (iv)  of paragraph 44(a).

45.  The evaluation of whether or not individual sites nominated
by States Parties satisfy the natural heritage criteria and the
conditions of integrity will be carried out by the World
Conservation Union (IUCN) and will normally include,

     Data assembly: Compilation of a standardized data sheet on
                    the site using the nomination submitted by
                    the States Party and other sources. 
                    Information on sites that are comparable to
                    the nominated site is reviewed in order to
                    enable a comparative evaluation of the
                    nominated site.  

   External review: The nomination is sent to experts
                    knowledgeable about the site for comments.

  Field inspection: In most cases, missions are sent to evaluate
                    the site and to discuss the nomination with
                    national and local authorities.

     Panel Review:  A draft evaluation prepared on the basis of
                    results obtained from the above three steps
                    is reviewed by a panel of experts at IUCN
                    Headquarters.

46.  The evaluation report which is submitted to the Bureau of
the World Heritage Committee, normally in mid-year, is an outcome
of the four steps mentioned above.  (See paragraph 66 below for
type of recommendations that the Bureau would make on nominations
and the procedure which leads, by the end of the year, to
decisions of the Committee on each nominated site.)

47.  In principle, a site could be inscribed on the World
Heritage List as long as it satisfies one of the four criteria
and the relevant conditions of integrity.  However, most
inscribed sites have met two or more criteria.  Nomination
dossiers, IUCN evaluations and the final recommendations of the
Committee on each inscribed site are available for consultation
by States Parties which may wish to use such information as
guides for identifying and elaborating nomination of sites within
their own territories.

E.   Procedure for the eventual deletion of properties from the
     World Heritage List

48.  The Committee adopted the following procedure for the
deletion of properties from the World Heritage List in cases:

     (a)  where the property has deteriorated to the extent that
          it has lost those characteristics which determined its
          inclusion in the World Heritage List; and

     (b)  where the intrinsic qualities of a World Heritage site
          were already threatened at the time of its nomination
          by action of man and where the necessary corrective
          measures as outlined by the State Party at the time,
          have not been taken within the time proposed.

49.  When a property inscribed on the World Heritage List has
seriously deteriorated, or when the necessary corrective measures
have not been taken within the time proposed, the State Party on
whose territory the property is situated should so inform the
Secretariat of the Committee.  

50.  When the Secretariat receives such information from a source
other than the State Party concerned, it will, as far as
possible, verify the source and the contents of the information
in consultation with the State Party concerned and request its
comments.  

51.  The Secretariat will request the competent advisory
organization(s) (ICOMOS, IUCN or ICCROM) to forward comments on
the information received.

52.  The information received, together with the comments of the
State Party and the advisory organization(s), will be brought to
the attention of the Bureau of the Committee. The Bureau may take
one of the following steps:

     (a)  it may decide that the property has not seriously
          deteriorated and that no further action should be
          taken;

     (b)  when the Bureau considers that the property has
          seriously deteriorated, but not to the extent that its
          restoration is impossible, it may recommend to the
          Committee that the property be maintained on the List,
          provided that the State Party takes the necessary
          measures to restore the property within a reasonable
          period of time. The Bureau may also recommend that
          technical co-operation be provided under the World
          Heritage Fund for work connected with the restoration
          of the property, proposing to the State Party to
          request such assistance, if it has not already been
          done; 

     (c)  when there is evidence that the property has
          deteriorated to the point where it has irretrievably
          lost those characteristics which determined its
          inclusion in the List, the Bureau may recommend that
          the Committee delete the property from the List;
          before any such recommendation is submitted to the
          Committee, the Secretariat will inform the State Party
          concerned of the Bureau's recommendation; any comments
          which the State Party may make with respect to the
          recommendation of the Bureau will be brought to the
          attention of the Committee, together with the Bureau's
          recommendation;

     (d)  when the information available is not sufficient to
          enable the Bureau to take one of the measures
          described in (a), (b) or (c) above, the Bureau may
          recommend to the Committee that the Secretariat be
          authorized to take the necessary action to ascertain,
          in consultation with the State Party concerned, the
          present condition of the property, the dangers to the
          property and the feasibility of adequately restoring
          the property, and to report to the Bureau on the
          results of its action; such measures may include the
          sending of a fact-finding mission or the consultation
          of specialists. In cases where emergency action is
          required, the Bureau may itself authorize the
          financing from the World Heritage Fund of the
          emergency assistance that is required.

53.  The Committee will examine the recommendation of the Bureau
and all the information available and will take a decision. Any
such decision shall, in accordance with Article 13 (8) of the
Convention, be taken by a majority of two-thirds of its members
present and voting. The Committee shall not decide to delete any
property unless the State Party has been consulted on the
question.

54.  The State Party shall be informed of the Committee's
decision and public notice of this decision shall be immediately
given by the Committee.

55.  If the Committee's decision entails any modification to the
World Heritage List, this modification will be reflected in the
next updated list that is published.

56.  In adopting the above procedure, the Committee was
particularly concerned that all possible measures should be taken
to prevent the deletion of any property from the List and was
ready to offer technical co-operation as far as possible to
States Parties in this connection. Furthermore, the Committee
wishes to draw the attention of States Parties to the
stipulations of Article 4 of the Convention which reads as
follows:

     "Each State Party to this Convention recognizes that the
     duty of ensuring the identification, protection,
     conservation, presentation and transmission to future
     generations of the cultural and natural heritage referred
     to in Articles 1 and 2 and situated on its territory,
     belongs primarily to that State...".

57.  In this connection, the Committee recommends that States
Parties co-operate with the advisory bodies which have been asked
by the Committee to carry out monitoring and reporting on its
behalf on the progress of work undertaken for the preservation
of properties inscribed on the World Heritage List.

58.  The World Heritage Committee invites the States Parties to
the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural
and Natural Heritage to inform the Committee, through the UNESCO
Secretariat, of their intention to undertake or to authorize in
an area protected under the Convention major restorations or new
constructions which may affect the World Heritage value of the
property. Notice should be given as soon as possible (for
instance, before drafting basic documents for specific projects)
and before making any decisions that would be difficult to
reverse, so that the Committee may assist in seeking appropriate
solutions to ensure that the world heritage value of the site is
fully preserved.


F.   Guidelines for the evaluation and examination of nominations

59.  The World Heritage List should be as representative as
possible of all cultural and natural properties which meet the
Convention's requirement of outstanding universal value and the
cultural and natural criteria and the conditions of authenticity
or integrity adopted by the Committee (see paragraphs 24 to 44
above).

60.  Each cultural property, including its state of preservation,
should be evaluated relatively, that is, it should be compared
with that of other property of the same type dating from the same
period, both inside and outside the State Party's borders.

61.  Each natural site should be evaluated relatively, that is,
it should be compared with other sites of the same type, both
inside and outside the State Party's borders, within a
biogeographic province or migratory pattern.

62.  Furthermore ICOMOS and IUCN should pay particular attention
to the following points which relate to the evaluation and
examination of nominations:

     (a)  both NGOs are encouraged to be as strict as possible
          in their evaluations;

     (b)  the manner of the professional evaluation carried out
          by ICOMOS and IUCN should be fully described when each
          nomination is presented;

     (c)  ICOMOS is requested to make comparative evaluations of
          properties belonging to the same type of cultural
          property;

     (d)  IUCN is requested to make comments and recommendations
          on the integrity and future management of each
          property recommended by the Bureau, during its
          presentation to the Committee;

     (e)  the NGO concerned is encouraged to present slides on
          the properties recommended for the World Heritage List
          during the preliminary discussions which take place
          prior to the examination of individual proposals for
          inscription on the List.

63.  Representatives of a State Party, whether or not a member
of the Committee, shall not speak to advocate the inclusion in
the List of a property nominated by that State, but only to deal
with a point of information in answer to a question.

64.  The criteria for which a specific property is included in
the World Heritage List will be set out by the Committee in its
reports and publications, along with a clearly stated summary of
the characteristics which justified the inclusion of the property
which should be reflected in its future management.  


G.   Format and content of nominations

65.  The same printed form approved by the Committee is used for
the submission of nominations of cultural and natural properties.
The following information and documentation is to be provided:
(For the nominations of groups of buildings or sites the specific
documentation to be provided is listed in sub-paragraph (f)
below.)

     (a)  Specific location

          Country
          State, province or region
          Name of property
          Maps and plans with indications of location of
          property and of geographical co-ordinates

     (b)  Juridical data

          Owner
          Legal status:
          .    category of ownership (public or private)
          .    details of legal and administrative provisions
               for the protection of the property. The nature of
               the legal texts as well as their conditions of
               implementation should be clearly specified
          .    state of occupancy and accessibility to the  
               general public

          Responsible administration
          .    details should be given of the mechanism or body
               already set up or intended to be established in
               order to ensure the proper management of the
               property

     (c)  Identification

          Description and inventory
          Photographic and cinematographic documentation
          History
          Bibliography

     (d)  State of preservation/conservation

          Diagnosis
          Agent responsible for preservation/conservation
          History of preservation/conservation
          Measures for preservation/conservation (including
          management plans or proposals for such plans)
          Development plans for the region

     (e)  Justification for inclusion in the World Heritage List

          Information should be provided under three separate
          headings as follows: (i) the reasons for which the
          property is considered to meet one or more of the
          criteria set out under paragraphs 24 and 44 above;
          (ii) an evaluation of the property's present state of
          preservation as compared with similar properties
          elsewhere; (iii) indications as to the authenticity of
          the property.

     (f)  Specific documentation to be provided with nominations
          of groups of buildings or sites

          If the nomination concerns a group of buildings or
          site as described in paragraph 23 above specific
          documentation and juridical data are to be provided:

          (i)  Maps and plans

               Three maps are to be provided:

               -    one map which shows the exact location of
                    the property and its immediate natural and
                    built environment (with, if necessary in
                    annex, a series of topographical plans).

                    Scale: between 1/20.000 or 1/50.000 and
                    1/100.000

                    Date of publication: the most recent prior
                    to presentation of the nomination

               -    one map which precisely delimits the
                    perimeter of the nominated area and which
                    clearly indicates the location of each
                    monument listed in the nomination. The
                    nominated property can be one uninterrupted
                    area or composed of several separate areas.
                    In the latter case, the perimeter of each of
                    these areas must be indicated and the nature
                    of protection of the intermediate zones must
                    also be described.

                    Scale: between 1/5,000 and 1/25,000

               -    one map indicating the zones of different
                    degrees of legal protection which might
                    exist:

                    -    inside the perimeter of the nominated
                         property
                    -    outside the perimeter of the nominated
                         property

                    Scale: between 1/5,000 and 1/25,000. This
                    map should be of a size that lends itself to
                    easy reproduction.

          (ii) Photographic documentation

               This documentation should include:

               -    an aerial view
               -    views of the monuments listed in the
                    nomination (interior and exterior)
               -    panoramic views taken in different
                    directions from outside the proposed
                    perimeter (skyline)

               -    views taken inside the proposed perimeter
                    which give an exact idea of the urban
                    landscape (townscape)

               -    a selection of high quality original colour
                    slides for which the non-exclusive
                    reproduction rights are granted to UNESCO on
                    the form provided for this purpose. It
                    should be noted that colour slides are
                    absolutely necessary for the presentation of
                    the property to the Bureau and to the
                    Committee.

               Audio-visual documents, where applicable.


        (iii)  Supplementary documentation

               Information on institutions or associations
               concerned with the study or safeguard of the site

               -    within the country
               -    abroad

          (iv) Legal information

               -    laws or decrees which govern the protection
                    of monuments and sites (date and text)

               -    decrees or orders which protect the
                    nominated property (date and text)

               -    master plan for historic preservation
                    land-use plan, urban development plan,
                    regional development plan or other
                    infrastructure projects

               -    town planning regulations and orders issued
                    in application of these plans.

          Indications should be given as to whether these
          various juridical provisions prevent:

               -    uncontrolled exploitation of the ground below
                    the property

               -    the demolition and reconstruction of
                    buildings situated within the protected
                    zones

               -    the raising of the height of buildings

               -    the transformation of the urban fabric

          What are the penalties foreseen in case of a
          contravention of these juridical provisions?

          What, if any, juridical or other measures exist which
     encourage the revitalization of the property concerned in
     full respect of its historic authenticity and its social
     diversity?

          (v)  Administrative framework

               Responsible administration:
               -    at the national or federal level
               -    at the level of federated States or provinces
               -    at the regional level
               -    at the local level


H.   Procedure and timetable for the processing of nominations

66.  The annual schedule set out below has been fixed for the
receipt and processing of nominations to the World Heritage List.
It should be emphasized, however, that the process of nominating
properties to the World Heritage List is an ongoing one.
Nominations to the List can be submitted at any time during the
year. Those received by 1 July of a given year will be considered
during the following year. Those received after 1 July of a given
year can only be considered in the second subsequent year.
Despite the inconvenience it may cause certain States Parties,
the Committee has decided to bring forward the deadline for
submission of nominations in order to ensure that all working
documents can be made available to the Bureau as well as States
members of the Committee no later than 6 weeks before the start
of the sessions of the Bureau and the Committee. This will also
enable the Committee at its annual December session to be made
aware of the number and nature of nominations to be examined at
its next session the following year.

1 July

     Deadline for receipt by the Secretariat of nominations to
be considered by the Committee the following year.

15 September

     The Secretariat:

     (1)  registers each nomination and thoroughly verifies its
          contents and accompanying documentation. In the case
          of incomplete nominations, the Secretariat must
          immediately request the missing information from
          States Parties.

     (2)  transmits nominations, provided they are complete, to
          the appropriate international non-governmental
          organization (ICOMOS, IUCN or both), which:

               immediately examines each nomination to ascertain
               those cases in which additional information is
               required and takes the necessary steps, in
               co-operation with the Secretariat, to obtain the
               complementary data, and

By 1 April

     The appropriate non-governmental organization undertakes a
     professional evaluation of each nomination according to the
     criteria adopted by the Committee. It transmits these
     evaluations to the Secretariat under three categories:

     (a)  properties which are recommended for inscription
          without reservation;

     (b)  properties which are not recommended for inscription;

     (c)  properties whose eligibility for inscription is not
          considered absolutely clear.

During April

     The Secretariat checks the evaluations of the
     non-governmental organizations and ensures that States
     members of the Committee receive them by 1 May with
     available documentation.

June/July

     The Bureau examines the nominations and makes its
     recommendations thereon to the Committee under the
     following four categories:

     (a)  properties which it recommends for inscription without
          reservation;

     (b)  properties which it does not recommend for
          inscription;

     (c)  properties that need to be referred back to the
          nominating State for further information or
          documentation;

     (d)  properties whose examination should be deferred on the
          ground that a more in-depth assessment or study is
          needed.

July-November

     The report of the Bureau is transmitted by the Secretariat
     as soon as possible to all States Parties members of the
     Committee, as well as to all States Parties concerned. The
     Secretariat endeavours to obtain from the States Parties
     concerned the additional information requested on
     properties under category (c) above and transmits this
     information to ICOMOS, IUCN and States members of the
     Committee.  If the requested information is not obtained by
     1 October, the nomination will not be eligible for review
     by the Committee at its regular session in the same year. 
     Nominations assigned to category (c) by the Bureau may not
     be examined except in the case that missing information at
     the time of the Bureau was factual.  Nominations assigned
     to category (d) will not be examined by the Committee the
     same year.

December

     The Committee examines the nominations on the basis of the
     Bureau's recommendations, together with any additional
     information provided by the States Parties concerned as
     well as the comments thereon of ICOMOS and IUCN. It
     classifies its decisions on nominated properties in the
     following three categories:

     (a)  properties which it inscribes on the World Heritage
          List;

     (b)  properties which it decides not to inscribe on the
          List;

     (c)  properties whose consideration is deferred.

January

     The Secretariat forwards the report of the December session
     of the World Heritage Committee, which contains all the
     decisions taken by the Committee, to all States Parties.

67.  In the event that a State Party wishes to nominate an
extension to a property already inscribed on the World Heritage
List, the same documentation should be provided and the same
procedure shall apply as for new nominations, set out in
paragraph 65 above. This provision will not apply for extensions
which are simple modifications of these limits of the property
in question: in this case, the request for modification of these
limits is submitted directly to the Bureau which will examine in
particular the relevant maps and plans. The Bureau can approve
such modifications, or it may consider that the change is
sufficiently important to constitute an extension of the
property, in which case the procedure for new nominations will
apply.

68.  The normal deadlines for the submission and processing of
nominations will not apply in the case of properties which, in
the opinion of the Bureau, after consultation with the competent
international non-governmental organization, would unquestionably
meet the criteria for inclusion in the World Heritage List and
which have suffered damage from disaster caused by natural events
or by human activities. Such nominations will be processed on an
emergency basis.


II. MONITORING THE STATE OF CONSERVATION OF PROPERTIES INSCRIBED
ON THE WORLD HERITAGE LIST

69.  One of the essential functions of the Committee is to
monitor the state of conservation of properties inscribed on the
World Heritage List and to take action thereupon. In the
following, a distinction will be made between systematic and
reactive monitoring.

A.   Systematic monitoring and reporting

70.  Systematic monitoring and reporting is the continuous
process of observing the conditions of World Heritage sites with
periodic reporting on its state of conservation.

     The objectives of systematic monitoring and reporting are:

     World Heritage site: Improved site management, advanced
     planning, reduction of emergency and ad-hoc interventions,
     and reduction of costs through preventive conservation.

     State Party: Improved World Heritage policies, advanced
     planning, improved site management and preventive
     conservation.

     Region: Regional cooperation, regional World Heritage
     policies and activities better targeted to the specific
     needs of the region.

     Committee/Secretariat: Better understanding of the
     conditions of the sites and of the needs on the site,
     national and regional levels. Improved policy and decision
     making.

71.  It is the prime responsibility of the States Parties to put
in place on-site monitoring arrangements as an integral component
of day-to-day conservation and management of the sites. States
Parties should do so in close collaboration with the site
managers or the agency with management authority. It is necessary
that every year the conditions of the site be recorded by the
site manager or the agency with management authority.

72.  The States Parties are invited to submit to the World
Heritage Committee through the World Heritage Centre, every five
years, a scientific report on the state of conservation of the
World Heritage sites on their territories. To this end, the
States Parties may request expert advice from the Secretariat or
the advisory bodies. The Secretariat may also commission expert
advice with the agreement of the States Parties.

73.  To facilitate the work of the Committee and its Secretariat
and to achieve greater regionalization and decentralization of
World Heritage work, these reports will be examined separately
by region as determined by the Committee. The World Heritage
Centre will synthesize the national reports by regions. In doing
so, full use will be made of the available expertise of the
advisory bodies and other organizations.

74.  The Committee will decide for which regions state of
conservation reports should be presented to its forthcoming
sessions. The States Parties concerned will be informed at least
one year in advance so as to give them sufficient time to prepare
the state of conservation reports.

75.  The Secretariat will take the necessary measures for
adequate World Heritage information collection and management,
making full use, to the extent possible, of the
information/documentation services of the advisory bodies and
others.

B.   Reactive monitoring

76.  Reactive monitoring is the reporting by the World Heritage
Centre, other sectors of UNESCO and the advisory bodies to the
Bureau and the Committee on the state of conservation of specific
World Heritage sites that are under threat. To this end, the
States Parties shall submit to the Committee through the World
Heritage Centre, specific reports and impact studies each time
exceptional circumstances occur or work is undertaken which may
have an effect on the state of conservation of the site. Reactive
monitoring is foreseen in the procedures for the eventual
deletion of properties from the World Heritage List as set out
in paras. 50-58. It is also foreseen in reference to properties
inscribed, or to be inscribed, on the List of World Heritage in
Danger as set out in paras. 83-90.   

III. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE LIST OF WORLD HERITAGE IN DANGER


A.   Guidelines for the inclusion of properties in the List of
     World Heritage in Danger

77.  In accordance with Article 11, paragraph 4, of the
Convention, the Committee may include a property in the List of
World Heritage in Danger when the following requirements are met:

     (i)  the property under consideration is on the World
          Heritage List;

     (ii) the property is threatened by serious and specific
          danger;

    (iii) major operations are necessary for the conservation of
          the property;

     (iv) assistance under the Convention has been requested
          for  the property; the Committee is of the view that
          its assistance in certain cases may most effectively
          be limited to messages of its concern, including the
          message sent by inclusion of a site on the List of
          World Heritage in Danger and that such assistance may
          be requested by any Committee member or the
          Secretariat.


B.   Criteria for the inclusion of properties in the List of
     World Heritage in Danger

78.  A World Heritage property - as defined in Articles 1 and 2
of the Convention - can be entered on the List of World Heritage
in Danger by the Committee when it finds that the condition of
the property corresponds to at least one of the criteria in
either of the two cases described below.

79.  In the case of cultural properties:

     (i)  ASCERTAINED DANGER -     The property is faced with
          specific and proven imminent danger, such as:

          (a)  serious deterioration of materials;

          (b)  serious deterioration of structure and/or
               ornamental features;

          (c)  serious deterioration of architectural or
               town-planning coherence;

          (d)  serious deterioration of urban or rural space, or
               the natural environment;

          (e)  significant loss of historical authenticity;

          (f)  important loss of cultural significance.

     (ii) POTENTIAL DANGER -  The property is faced with threats
          which could have deleterious effects on its inherent
          characteristics. Such threats are, for example:

          (a)  modification of juridical status of the property
               diminishing the degree of its protection;

          (b)  lack of conservation policy;

          (c)  threatening effects of regional planning projects;

          (d)  threatening effects of town planning;

          (e)  outbreak or threat of armed conflict;

          (f)  gradual changes due to geological, climatic or
               other environmental factors.

80.  In the case of natural properties:

     (i)  ASCERTAINED DANGER - The property is faced with
          specific and proven imminent danger, such as:

          (a)  A serious decline in the population of the
               endangered species or the other species of
               outstanding universal  value which the property
               was legally established to protect, either by
               natural factors such as disease or by man-made
               factors such as poaching.

          (b)  Severe deterioration of the natural beauty or
               scientific value of the property, as by human
               settlement, construction of reservoirs which
               flood important parts of the property, industrial
               and agricultural development including use of
               pesticides and fertilizers, major public works,
               mining, pollution, logging, firewood collection,
               etc.

          (c)  Human encroachment on boundaries or in upstream
               areas which threaten the integrity of the
               property.

     (ii) POTENTIAL DANGER -  The property is faced with major
          threats which could have deleterious effects on its
          inherent characteristics. Such threats are, for
          example:

          (a)  a modification of the legal protective status of
               the area;

          (b)  planned resettlement or development projects
               within the property or so situated that the
               impacts threaten the property;

          (c)  outbreak or threat of armed conflict;

          (d)  the management plan is lacking or inadequate, or
               not fully implemented.

81.  In addition, the factor or factors which are threatening the
integrity of the property must be those which are amenable to
correction by human action. In the case of cultural properties,
both natural factors and man-made factors may be threatening,
while in the case of natural properties, most threats will be
man-made and only very rarely with a natural factor (such as an
epidemic disease) be threatening to the integrity of the
property. In some cases, the factors threatening the integrity
of a property may be corrected by administrative or legislative
action, such as the cancelling of a major public works project
or the improvement of legal status.

82.  The Committee may wish to bear in mind the following
supplementary factors when considering the inclusion of a
cultural or natural property in the List of World Heritage in
Danger:

     (a)  Decisions which affect World Heritage properties are
          taken by Governments after balancing all factors. The
          advice of the World Heritage Committee can often be
          decisive if it can be given before the property
          becomes threatened.

     (b)  Particularly in the case of ascertained danger, the
          physical or cultural deteriorations to which a
          property has been subjected should be judged according
          to the intensity of its effects and analyzed case by
          case.

     (c)  Above all in the case of potential danger to a
          property, one should consider that:

          -    the threat should be appraised according to the
               normal evolution of the social and economic
               framework in which the property is situated;

          -    it is often impossible to assess certain threats
               - such as the threat of armed conflict - as to
               their effect on cultural or natural properties;

          -    some threats are not imminent in nature, but can
               only be anticipated, such as demographic growth.

     (d)  Finally, in its appraisal the Committee should take
          into account any cause of unknown or unexpected origin
          which endangers a cultural or natural property.

C.   Procedure for the inclusion of properties in the List of
     World Heritage in Danger

83.  When considering the inclusion of a property in the List of
World Heritage in Danger, the Committee shall develop, and adopt,
as far as possible, in consultation with the State Party
concerned, a programme for corrective measures.

84.  In order to develop the programme referred to in the
previous paragraph, the Committee shall request the Secretariat
to ascertain, as far as possible in cooperation with the State
Party concerned, the present condition of the property, the
dangers to the property and the feasibility of undertaking
corrective measures. The Committee may further decide to send a
mission of qualified observers from IUCN, ICOMOS, ICCROM or other
organizations to visit the property, evaluate the nature and
extent of the threats and propose the measures to be taken.

85.  The information received, together with the comments as
appropriate of the State Party and the advisory organization(s)
shall be brought to the attention of the Committee by the
Secretariat.

86.  The Committee shall examine the information available and
take a decision concerning the inscription of the property on the
List of World Heritage in Danger. Any such decision shall be
taken by a majority of two-thirds of the Committee members
present and voting.  The Committee will then define the programme
of corrective action to be taken.  This programme will be
proposed to the State Party concerned for immediate
implementation.

87.  The State Party concerned shall be informed of the
Committee's decision and public notice of the decision shall
immediately be issued by the Committee, in accordance with
Article 11.4 of the Convention.

88.  The Committee shall allocate a specific, significant portion
of the World Heritage Fund to financing of possible assistance
to World Heritage properties inscribed on the List of World
Heritage in Danger.

89.  The Committee shall review at regular intervals the state
of property on the List of World Heritage in Danger. This review
shall include such monitoring procedures and expert missions as
might be determined necessary by the Committee.

90.  On the basis of these regular reviews, the Committee shall
decide, in consultation with the State Party concerned whether:

     (i)  additional measures are required to conserve the
          property;

     (ii) to delete the property from the List of World Heritage
          in Danger if the property is no longer under threat;

    (iii) to consider the deletion of the property from both the
          List of World Heritage in Danger and the World
          Heritage List if the property has deteriorated to the
          extent that it has lost those characteristics which
          determined its inclusion in the World Heritage List,
          in accordance with the procedure set out in paragraphs
          48 to 58 above.


IV.  INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE

A.   Different forms of assistance available under the World
     Heritage Fund


     (i)  Preparatory assistance

91.  Assistance is available to States Parties for the purpose
of:

     (a)  preparing tentative lists of cultural and/or natural
          properties suitable for inclusion in the World
          Heritage List;

     (b)  organizing meetings for the harmonization of tentative
          lists within the same geo-cultural area;

     (c)  preparing nominations of cultural and natural
          properties to the World Heritage List; and

     (d)  preparing requests for technical co-operation,
          including requests relating to the organization of
          training courses.

This type of assistance, known as "preparatory assistance", can
take the form of consultant services, equipment or, in
exceptional cases, financial grants. The budgetary ceiling for
each preparatory assistance project is fixed at $15,000.

92.  Requests for preparatory assistance should be forwarded to
the Secretariat which will transmit them to the Chairperson, who
will decide on the assistance to be granted. Request forms
(reference WHC/5) can be obtained from the Secretariat.

     (ii) Emergency assistance

93.  States Parties may request emergency assistance for work in
connection with cultural and natural properties included or
suitable for inclusion in the World Heritage List and which have
suffered severe damage due to sudden, unexpected phenomena (such
as sudden land subsidence, serious fires or explosions, flooding)
or are in imminent danger of severe damage caused by these
phenomena. Emergency assistance does not concern cases of damage
or deterioration that has been caused by gradual processes such
as decay, pollution, erosion, etc. Such assistance may be made
available for the following purposes:

     (a)  to prepare urgent nominations of properties for the
          World Heritage List in conformity with paragraph 65 of
          these Guidelines;

     (b)  to draw up an emergency plan to safeguard properties
          inscribed on or nominated to the World Heritage List;

     (c)  to undertake emergency measures for the safeguarding
          of a property inscribed on or nominated to the World
          Heritage List.

94.  Requests for emergency assistance may be sent to the
Secretariat at any time using Form WHC/5. The World Heritage
Centre should consult to the extent possible relevant advisory
bodies and then submit these requests to the Chairperson who has
the authorization to approve emergency requests up to an amount
of US$50,000 whereas the Bureau can approve requests up to an
amount of US$75,000.

    (iii) Training

95.  States Parties may request support for the training of
specialised staff at all levels in the field of identification,
protection, conservation, presentation and rehabilitation of the
cultural and natural heritage. The training must be related to
the implementation of the World Heritage Convention.

96.  Priority in training activities will be given to group
training at the local or regional levels, particularly at
national or regional centres in accordance with Article 23 of the
Convention. The training of individual persons will be
essentially limited to short term refresher programmes and
exchanges of experience. 

97.  Requests for the training of specialised staff at the
national or regional level should contain the following
information:

  (a)     details on the training course concerned (courses
          offered, level of instruction, teaching staff, number
          of students and country of origin, date, place and
          duration, etc.) and, when applicable, the functional
          responsibility of each participant with respect to a
          designated World Heritage site; priority should be
          given, if funds are not sufficient to satisfy all
          requests, to those concerning management or
          conservation personnel of inscribed properties;

  (b)     type of assistance requested (financial contribution
          to costs of training, provision of specialised
          teaching staff, provision of equipment, books and
          educational materials for training courses);

  (c)     approximate cost of support requested, including as
          appropriate tuition fees, daily subsistence allowance,
          allocation for purchase of educational material,
          travel costs to and from training centre, etc.

  (d)     other contributions: national financing, received or
          anticipated multilateral or bilateral contributions;

  (e)     for recurring training courses, an in-depth report of
          the results obtained in each previous session shall be
          submitted by the recipient government or organization. 
          The report shall be forwarded to the appropriate
          advisory body for review and for its recommendations
          in connection with additional funding requests, as
          appropriate.

98.  Requests for support for individual training courses should
be submitted on the standard "Application for Fellowship" form
used for all fellowships administered by UNESCO and which can be
obtained from UNESCO National Commissions, UNESCO offices and the
offices of the United Nations Development Programme in Member
States, as well as from the Secretariat. Each request should be
accompanied by a statement indicating the relationship of the
proposed study plan to the implementation of the World Heritage
Convention within the State Party submitting the request and by
a commitment to submit a final technical report on the results
obtained as a result of the training grant.

99.  All requests for support for training activities should be
transmitted to the Secretariat which will ensure that the
information is complete and forward these requests along with an
estimation of the costs to the Chairperson for his approval. In
this regard the Chairperson can approve amounts up to $20,000.
Requests for sums above this amount follow the same procedure for
approval as for requests for technical cooperation set out in
paragraphs 101-106.

     (iv) Technical co-operation

100. States Parties can request technical co-operation for work
foreseen in safeguarding projects for properties included in the
World Heritage List. This assistance can take the forms outlined
in paragraph 22 of the Convention for World Heritage properties.

101. In order to make best use of the limited resources of the
World Heritage Fund and because of the increasing number of
cultural sites to be assisted, the Committee, while recognizing
the importance of archaeological objects coming from sites
inscribed on the World Heritage List, has decided not to accept
requests which may be submitted for equipment for archaeological
site museums whose function is the preservation of movables.

102. The following information should be provided in requests for
technical co-operation:

     (a)  Details of property

          -    date of inscription in the World Heritage List,

          -    description of property and of dangers to
               property,

          -    legal status of property;

     (b)  Details of request

          -    scientific and technical information on the work
               to be undertaken,

          -    detailed description of equipment requested
               (notably make, type, voltage, etc.) and of
               required personnel (specialists and workmen),
               etc.,

          -    if appropriate, details on the "training"
               component of the project,

          -    schedule indicating when the project activities
               will take place;

     (c)  Cost of proposed activities

          -    paid nationally,

          -    requested under the Convention,

          -    other multilateral or bilateral contributions
               received or expected, indicating how each
               contribution will be used;

     (d)  National body responsible for the project and details
          of project administration

     (e)  The Committee, wishing to establish a link between the
          monitoring of the state of conservation of World
          Heritage Sites and the granting of international
          assistance, has established as a requirement that
          requests for technical cooperation be accompanied by
          a state of conservation report of the property or site
          concerned.  

103. The Secretariat, if necessary, will request the State Party
concerned to provide further information. The Secretariat can
also ask for expert advice from the appropriate organization
(ICOMOS, IUCN, ICCROM).

104. Large-scale technical cooperation requests (that is those
exceeding $30,000) should be submitted to the Secretariat as
early as possible each year. Those received before 31 August will
be dealt with by the Committee the same year. Those received
after 31 August will be processed by the Secretariat in the order
in which they are received and will be considered by the
Committee the same year if it has been possible to complete their
processing in time. All large-scale requests will be considered
by the Bureau which will make recommendations on them to the
Committee.

105. The Bureau will consider the requests which are presented
at its meetings and will make recommendations thereon to the
Committee. The Secretariat will forward the Bureau's
recommendation to all the States members of the Committee.

106. If the recommendation is positive, the Secretariat will
proceed with all the preparatory work necessary for implementing
the technical co-operation immediately after the Committee has
decided to approve the project.

107. At the Committee meeting, the Committee will make a decision
on each request for technical cooperation, and for emergency
assistance and training beyond amounts authorized for approval
by the Chairperson and Bureau, taking account of the Bureau's
recommendation.  Representatives of a States Party, whether or
not a member of the Committee, shall not speak to advocate the
approval of an assistance request submitted by that State, but
only to deal with a point of information in answer to a question. 
The Committee's decisions will be forwarded to the States Parties
and the Centre will proceed to implement approved projects.

108. The above schedule does not apply, however, to projects the
cost of which does not exceed a ceiling of $30,000 for which the
following simplified procedure will be applied. 

     (a)  In the case of requests not exceeding $20,000, the
          Secretariat after examining the dossier and receiving
          the advice of ICCROM, ICOMOS or IUCN, as appropriate,
          will forward the request accompanied by all other
          relevant documents directly to the Chairperson, who is
          authorized to take decisions on the financing of such
          projects up to the total amount set aside for this
          purpose in the annual allocation from the World
          Heritage Fund, on the understanding that no more than
          20 percent of the total annual assistance budget,
          including technical cooperation and training (but
          excluding emergency assistance and preparatory
          assistance, for which separate rules have been
          established) may be allocated by the Chairperson.  The
          Chairperson is not authorized to approve requests
          submitted by his own country. 

     (b)  The Bureau is authorized to approve requests up to a
          maximum of $30,000 except for requests from States
          members of the Bureau; in such cases, the Bureau can
          only make recommendations to the Committee.  


     (v)  Assistance for promotional activities

109.      (a)  at the regional and international levels:

     The Committee has agreed to support the holding of meetings
     which could:

     -    help to create interest in the Convention within the
          countries of a given region;

     -    create a greater awareness of the different issues
          related to the implementation of the Convention to
          promote more active involvement in its application;

     -    be a means of exchanging experiences;

     -    stimulate joint promotional activities.

          (b)  at the national level:

     The Committee felt that requests concerning national
     activities for promoting the Convention could be considered
     only when they concern:

     -    meetings specifically organized to make the Convention
          better known or for the creation of national World
          Heritage associations, in accordance with Article 17
          of the Convention;

     -    preparation of information material for the general
          promotion of the Convention and not for the promotion
          of a particular site.

     The World Heritage Fund shall provide only small
contributions towards national promotional activities on a
selective basis and for a maximum amount of $5,000. However,
requests for sums above this amount could exceptionally be
approved for projects which are of special interest: the
Chairperson's agreement would be required and the maximum amount
approved would be $10,000.


B.   Order of priorities for the granting of international
     assistance

110. Without prejudicing the provisions of the Convention, which
shall always prevail, the Committee agreed on the following order
of priorities with respect to the type of activities to be
assisted under the Convention:

     -    emergency measures to save property included, or
          nominated for inclusion, in the World Heritage List
          (see paragraph 93 above);

     -    preparatory assistance for drawing up tentative lists
          of cultural and/or natural properties suitable for
          inclusion in the World Heritage List as well as
          nominations of types of properties under-represented
          on the list and requests for technical co-operation;

     -    projects which are likely to have a multiplier effect
          ("seed money") because they:

          .    stimulate general interest in conservation;
          .    contribute to the advancement of scientific
               research;
          .    contribute to the training of specialized
               personnel;
          .    generate contributions from other sources.

111. The Committee also agreed that the following factors would
in principle govern its decisions in granting assistance under
the Convention:

     (i)  the urgency of the work and of the protective measures
          to be taken;

     (ii) the legislative, administrative and financial
          commitment of the recipient State to protect and
          preserve the property;

    (iii) the cost of the project;

     (iv) the interest for, and exemplary value of, the project
          in respect of scientific research and the development
          of cost/effective conservation techniques;

      (v) the educational value both for the training of local
          experts and for the general public;

     (vi) the cultural and ecological benefits accruing from the
          project, and

    (vii) the social and economic consequences.

112. Properties included in the World Heritage List are
considered to be equal in value. For this reason, the criteria
proposed above make no reference to the relative value of the
properties. A balance will be maintained between funds allocated
to projects for the preservation of the cultural heritage on the
one hand and projects for the conservation of the natural
heritage on the other hand.

113. Requests for emergency, training and technical cooperation
shall be referred, if deemed necessary by the Secretariat, to the
appropriate advisory body (IUCN, ICOMOS, and/or ICCROM) for
professional review and evaluation, and its recommendations shall
be presented to the Bureau and the Committee for action.

C.   Agreement to be concluded with States receiving
     international assistance

114. When technical co-operation on a large scale is granted to
a State Party, an agreement will be concluded between the
Committee and the State concerned in which will be set out:

     (a)  the scope and nature of the technical co-operation
          granted;
     
     (b)  the obligations of the Government, including the
          submission of mid-term and final financial and
          technical reports, which shall be referred, if deemed
          necessary by the Secretariat,  to the appropriate
          advisory body (IUCN, ICOMOS, ICCROM) for review, and
          summaries of which shall be available to the
          Committee.

     (c)  the facilities, privileges and immunities to be
          applied by the Government to the Committee and/or
          UNESCO, to the property, funds and assets allocated to
          the project as well as to the officials and other
          persons performing services on behalf of the Committee
          and/or UNESCO in connection with the project.

115. The text of a standard agreement will be in conformity with
UNESCO regulations.

116. The Committee decided to delegate authority to the
Chairperson to sign such agreements on its behalf. In exceptional
circumstances, or when necessary for practical purposes, the
Chairperson may delegate authority to a member of the Secretariat
whom he will designate.


D.   Implementation of projects

117. In order to ensure the efficient implementation of a project
for which technical co-operation has been granted under the World
Heritage Fund, the Committee recommends that a single body -
whether national, regional, local, public or private - should be
entrusted with the responsibility of executing the project in the
State Party concerned.


E.   Conditions for the granting of international assistance

118. The conditions for and types of international assistance are
established by Articles 19 to 26 of the World Heritage
Convention. Establishing a parallel between the conditions of
eligibility for the World Heritage Committee set out in Article
16 of the Convention, the Committee decided, at its thirteenth
session (1989), that States who were in arrears of payment of
their contributions to the World Heritage Fund would not be able
to receive a grant of international assistance in the following
calendar year, it being understood that this provision would not
apply in case of emergency assistance  and training as defined
in these Guidelines. In making this decision, the Committee
wished to emphasize the importance which it accorded to States
Parties paying their entire contribution within the periods set
out in Article 16 of the Convention.


V.   WORLD HERITAGE FUND

119. The Committee decided that contributions offered to the
World Heritage Fund for international assistance campaigns and
other UNESCO projects for any property inscribed on the World
Heritage List shall be accepted and used as international
assistance pursuant to Section V of the Convention, and in
conformity with the modalities established for carrying out the
campaign or project.

120. States Parties to the Convention who anticipate making
contributions towards international assistance campaigns or other
UNESCO projects for any property inscribed on the List are
encouraged to make their contributions through the World Heritage
Fund.

121. The financial regulations for the Fund are set out in
document WHC/7.


VI.  BALANCE BETWEEN THE CULTURAL AND THE NATURAL HERITAGE IN
     THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CONVENTION

122. In order to improve the balance between the cultural and
natural heritage in the implementation of the Convention, the
Committee has recommended that the following measures be taken:

     (a)  Preparatory assistance to States Parties should be
          granted on a priority basis for:

          (i)  the establishment of tentative lists of cultural
               and natural properties situated in their
               territories and suitable for inclusion in the
               World Heritage List;

          (ii) the preparation of nominations of types of
               properties underrepresented in the World Heritage
               List.

     (b)  States Parties to the Convention should provide the
          Secretariat with the name and address of the
          governmental organization(s) primarily responsible for
          cultural and natural properties, so that copies of all
          official correspondence and documents can be sent by
          the Secretariat to these focal points as appropriate.

     (c)  States Parties to the Convention should convene at
          regular intervals at the national level a joint
          meeting of those persons responsible for natural and
          cultural heritage in order that they may discuss
          matters pertaining to the implementation of the
          Convention. This does not apply to States Parties
          where one single organization is dealing with both
          cultural and natural heritage.

     (d)  States Parties to the Convention should choose as
          their representatives persons qualified in the field
          of natural and cultural heritage, thus complying with
          Article 9, paragraph 3, of the Convention.  States
          members of the Committee should communicate in advance
          to the Secretariat the names and status of their
          representatives.  

     (e)  The Committee, deeply concerned with maintaining a
          balance in the number of experts from the natural and
          cultural fields represented on the Bureau, urges that
          every effort be made in future elections in order to
          ensure that:

          (i)  the chair is not held by persons with expertise
               in the same field, either cultural or natural,
               for more than two successive years;

          (ii) at least two "cultural" and at least two
               "natural" experts are present at Bureau meetings
               to ensure balance and credibility in reviewing
               nominations to the World Heritage List.

     (f)  In accordance with Article 10.2 of the Convention and
          with Rule 7 of the Rules of Procedure, the Committee
          shall, at any time, invite to its meetings public or
          private bodies or individuals who would attend as
          observers and augment the expertise available to it. 
          These observers shall be chosen with a view to a
          balanced participation between the natural and
          cultural heritage.


VII. OTHER MATTERS

A.   Use of the World Heritage Emblem and the name, symbol or
     depiction of World Heritage sites

123. At its second session, the Committee adopted the World
Heritage Emblem which had been designed by Mr.Michel Olyff. This
emblem symbolizes the interdependence of cultural and natural
properties: the central square is a form created by man and the
circle represents nature, the two being intimately linked. The
emblem is round, like the world, but at the same time it is a
symbol of protection. The Committee decided that the two versions
proposed by the artist (see Annex 2) could be used, in any
colour, depending on the use, the technical possibilities and
considerations of an artistic nature. In practice however, the
second version is usually preferred by States Parties and has
been used by the Secretariat for promotional activities.

124. Properties included in the World Heritage List should be
marked with the emblem which should, however, be placed in such
a way that it does not visually impair the property in question.


125. States Parties to the Convention should take all possible
measures to prevent the use of the emblem of the Convention and
the use of the name of the Committee and the Convention in their
respective countries by any group or for any purpose not
explicitly recognized and approved by the Committee. The World
Heritage emblem should, in particular, not be used for any
commercial purposes unless specific authorization is obtained
from the Committee.

126. The name, symbol or depiction of a World Heritage site, or
of any element thereof, should not be used for commercial
purposes unless written authorization has been obtained from the
State concerned on the principles of using the said name, symbol
or depiction, and unless the exact text or display has been
approved by that State and, as far as possible, by the national
authority specifically concerned with the protection of the site.
Any such utilization should be in conformity with the reasons for
which the property has been placed on the World Heritage List.


B.   Production of plaques to commemorate the inclusion of
     properties in the World Heritage List

127. These plaques are designed to inform the public of the
country concerned and foreign visitors, that the site visited has
a particular value which has been recognized by the international
community. In other words, the site is exceptional, of interest
not only to one nation, but also to the whole world. However,
these plaques have an additional function which is to inform the
general public about the World Heritage Convention or at least
about the World Heritage concept and the World Heritage List.

128. The Committee has adopted the following Guidelines for the
production of these plaques:

     -    the plaque should be so placed that it can easily be
          seen by visitors, without disfiguring the site;

     -    the World Heritage symbol should appear on the plaque;

     -    the text should mention the site's exceptional
          universal value; in this regard it might be useful to
          give a short description of the site's outstanding
          characteristics. States may, if they wish, use the
          descriptions appearing in the various World Heritage
          publications or in the World Heritage exhibit, and
          which may be obtained from the Secretariat;

     -    the text should make reference to the World Heritage
          Convention and particularly to the World Heritage List
          and to the international recognition conferred by
          inscription on this List (however, it is not necessary
          to mention at which session of the Committee the site
          was inscribed);

     -    it may be appropriate to produce the text in several
          languages for sites which receive many foreign
          visitors.

129. The Committee proposed the following text as an example:

     "(Name of site) has been inscribed upon the World Heritage
     List of the Convention concerning the Protection of the
     World Cultural and Natural Heritage. Inscription on this
     List confirms the exceptional universal value of a cultural
     or natural site which deserves protection for the benefit
     of all humanity."

This text could be then followed by a brief description of the
site concerned.


C.   Rules of Procedure of the Committee

130. The Rules of Procedure of the Committee, adopted by the
Committee at its first session and amended at its second and
third sessions, are to be found in document WHC/1.


D.   Meetings of the World Heritage Committee

131. In years when the General Assembly of States Parties is
held, the ordinary session of the World Heritage Committee will
take place as soon as possible after the Assembly.

132. As provided for in Article 10.3 of the Convention and in
accordance with Rules 20-21 of the Rules of Procedure, the
Committee shall constitute sub-committees during its regular
sessions to examine selected items of business referred to them
with the object of reporting and making recommendations to the
full Committee for action.


E.   Meetings of the Bureau of the World Heritage Committee

133. The Bureau shall meet twice a year, once in June/July and
a second time immediately preceding the Committee's regular
session.  The newly elected Bureau shall meet as necessary during
the Committee's regular session.


F.   Participation of experts from developed countries
     
134. In order to ensure a fair representation within the
Committee of the various geographical and cultural areas, the
Committee decided to include in its budget a sum intended to
cover the cost of participation, in its sessions and sessions of
its Bureau, of representatives of States members of the Committee
which are on the list of least developed countries issued by the
United Nations but only for persons who are experts in
conservation of the cultural or natural heritage.  

135. Requests for assistance to participate in the Bureau and
Committee meetings should reach the Secretariat at least four
weeks before the session concerned.  These requests will be
considered in the limit of resources available as decided by the
Committee, in decreasing order of NGP of each State member of the
Committee, and primarily for one representative from each State. 
In no event may the Fund finance more than two representatives
by State, who must in this case be one expert in the natural and
one in the cultural heritage field.

G.   Publication of the World Heritage List

136. An up-to-date version of the World Heritage List and the
List of the World Heritage in Danger will be published every
year.

137. The name of the States having nominated the properties
inscribed on the World Heritage List will be presented in the
published form of the List under the following heading: 
"Contracting State having submitted the nomination of the
property in accordance with the Convention".


H.   Action at the national level to promote a greater awareness
     of the activities undertaken under the Convention

138. States Parties should promote the establishment and
activities of associations concerned with the safeguarding of
cultural and natural sites.

139. States Parties are reminded of Articles 17 and 27 of the
Convention concerning the establishment of national, public and
private foundations or associations whose purpose is to invite
donations for the protection of the world heritage and the
organization of educational and information programmes to
strengthen appreciation and respect by their peoples of this
heritage.

I.   Links with other Conventions and Recommendations

140. The World Heritage Committee has recognized the collective
interest that would be advanced by closer coordination of its
work with other international conservation instruments.  These
include the 1949 Geneva Convention, the 1954 Hague Convention,
the 1970 UNESCO Convention, the Ramsar Convention, and CITES, as
well as other regional conventions and future conventions that
will pursue conservation objectives, as appropriate.  The
Committee will invite representatives of the intergovernmental
bodies under related conventions to attend its meetings as
observers.  Similarly, the Secretariat will appoint a
representative to observe meetings of the other intergovernmental
bodies upon receipt of an invitation.  The Secretariat will
ensure through the World Heritage Centre appropriate coordination
and information-sharing between the Committee and other
conventions, programmes and international organizations related
to the conservation of cultural and natural heritage.