The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes

The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes

The Loire Valley is an outstanding cultural landscape of great beauty, containing historic towns and villages, great architectural monuments (the châteaux), and cultivated lands formed by many centuries of interaction between their population and the physical environment, primarily the river Loire itself.

Val de Loire entre Sully-sur-Loire et Chalonnes

Le Val de Loire est un paysage culturel exceptionnel, comprenant des villes et villages historiques, de grands monuments architecturaux - les châteaux - et des terres cultivées, façonnées par des siècles d'interaction entre les populations et leur environnement physique, dont la Loire elle-même.

وادي نهر اللوار بين سالي سور لوار وشالون

تشكّل  وادي نهر اللوار منظراً ثقافياً استثنائياً يشمل مُدناً وقرى تاريخية ونصباً هندسية عظيمة أي القصور، وأراض مزروعة حرثتها قرون من التفاعل بين الشعوب ومحيطها الحسيّ الذي يجسده نهر اللوار بنفسه.

source: UNESCO/ERI

卢瓦尔河畔叙利与沙洛纳间的卢瓦尔河谷

卢瓦尔河谷拥有最美丽、最杰出的文化景观,沿岸分布着大量的历史名镇和村庄、雄伟的建筑古迹(城堡),以及几个世纪以来人类开垦的耕地,这是人类和自然环境(主要是卢瓦尔河)相互作用、和谐发展的结果。

source: UNESCO/ERI

Долина Луары от Сюлли-сюр-Луар до Шалона

Долина Луары – это выдающийся культурный ландшафт исключительной живописности, включающий исторические города и деревни, величественные архитектурные памятники – замки. Также ландшафт составляют окультуренные земли, которые формировались веками в процессе взаимодействия человека с окружающей его средой и, прежде всего, с самой рекой Луарой.

source: UNESCO/ERI

Valle del Loira entre Sully-sur-Loire y Chalonnes

Este paisaje cultural, único en su género, posee pequeñas ciudades y pueblos históricos, grandes monumentos arquitectónicos (castillos y palacios) y tierras de cultivo, que son el resultado de la interacción entre sus habitantes y el medio físico, en particular el río Loira.

source: UNESCO/ERI

シュリー-シュル-ロワールとシャロンヌ間のロワール渓谷

source: NFUAJ

Loire vallei tussen Sully-sur-Loire en Chalonnes

De Loire vallei is een uitzonderlijk cultureel landschap van grote schoonheid, met historische dorpen en steden, waaronder Blois, Chinon, Orléans, Saumur en Tours. Tot de grote architecturale monumenten behoren de wereldberoemde kastelen zoals Château de Chambord. De gecultiveerde landschappen zijn gevormd door vele eeuwen interactie tussen de bevolking en de fysieke omgeving, in de eerste plaats de Loire zelf. Het landschap kent een grote variatie: steden, tuinbouw, wijngaarden en jachtbossen. De Loire vallei en de vele culturele monumenten illustreren de invloed van de idealen van de Renaissance en de Verlichting op het West-Europese denken en design.

Source: unesco.nl

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The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes © Editions Gelbart
Justification for Inscription

Criterion (i): The Loire Valley is noteworthy for the quality of its architectural heritage, in its historic towns such as Blois, Chinon, Orléans, Saumur, and Tours, but in particular in its world-famous castles, such as the Château de Chambord.

Criterion (ii): The Loire Valley is an outstanding cultural landscape along a major river which bears witness to an interchange of human values and to a harmonious development of interactions between human beings and their environment over two millennia.

Criterion (iv): The landscape of the Loire Valley, and more particularly its many cultural monuments, illustrate to an exceptional degree the ideals of the Renaissance and the Age of the Enlightenment on western European thought and design.

Long Description

The Loire Valley is an outstanding cultural landscape along a major river which bears witness to an interchange of human values and to a harmonious development of interactions between human beings and their environment over two millennia. It is noteworthy for the quality of its architectural heritage, in its historic towns such as Blois, Chinon, Orléans, Saumur and Tours, but in particular in its world-famous castles, such as the Château de Chambord.

The basin of the River Loire occupies a huge area in central and western France, stretching from the southern part of the Massif Central to an estuary on the Atlantic coast. Some 200 km of the central part of the main river valley, stretching from Sully east of Orleans to the junction of the Loire and the Maine near Angers in the west. Essentially this is the 'new' Loire, for the river originally drained north-eastwards into the Paris basin. This length now lies in two regions, Centre and Pays de la Loire, and four departments. Along the Loire between Orléans and Angers, the valley is characterized by low cliffs of tufa and limestone and, often below one or more river terraces, there is a flood plain dissected by old channels. The valley has a long history of periodic catastrophic flooding, carefully recorded as stone-cut water levels at numerous places along it, and even today its inhabitants live perennially under threat of severe inundation. Much contemporary river management is concerned to minimize that risk.

For most of its length in the World Heritage site the Loire is confined within dykes. Its banks are also punctuated at intervals of only a few kilometres by a series of villages, small towns and cities. Notable among the urban settlements are (from north-east to south-west) Sully, Orleans, Blois, Amboise, Tours, Saumur and Angers. Land use is extremely varied, from urban density through intense horticulture to vineyards (some reliant on flooding) to hunting forest.

The Roman impact on the landscape was massive, and it today still strongly influences settlement location and urban form and road communications. The Loire was one of the most important arteries for communications and trade in Gaul. In the late Roman period St Martin, Bishop of Tours, founded an abbey at Marmoutier around 372, and this was to serve as the model for many other monastic settlements in the Loire Valley in the centuries that followed.

The sanctuary at Tours was one of the most important pilgrimage centres in Europe until it was superseded by Santiago de Compostela. The many monasteries served as focal points for settlement in the Middle Ages. Seigniorial power developed in the 10th century and made a profound impression on the landscape. Land allotment followed the patterns of feudal society and strongly fortified residences were built by the overlords; these, too, acted as focal points for settlement.

The Loire Valley was a frontier zone during the Hundred Years' War and the scene of many confrontations between French and English. The castles were rebuilt and extended to become massive fortresses, the forerunners of the chateaux of today. The ever-present danger to Paris from the English during the war resulted in the royal court spending long periods at Tours. With the end of the war in the mid-15th century the valley was an ideal place for humanism and the Renaissance to take root in France. This involved inter alia the dismantling of the massive medieval fortresses and their reconstruction as palaces for pleasure and recreation.

The 17th-18th centuries saw the development of a secular commercial economy based on industry, crafts, trade, shipping, the river, and the towns alongside the feudal survival of the Ancien Régime. The late 18th century also saw the first water-management controls introduced in the valley; these were intensified throughout the 19th century. The romantic representation of the valley in the 19th century by writers and painters led to the Loire becoming a magnet for tourists, first from France, then Europe, and then in the 20th century the rest of the world.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC
Historical Description

The Loire Valley was important over much of pre- and protohistory. The Roman impact on the landscape was massive, and it today still strongly influences settlement location and form (especially urban) and road communications. The Loire was one of the most important arteries for communications and trade in Gaul.

In the late Roman period St Martin, Bishop of Tours, founded an abbey at Marmoutier around 372, and this was to serve as the model for many other monastic settlements in the Loire Valley in the centuries that followed. The sanctuary at Tours was one of the most important pilgrimage centres in Europe until it was superseded by Santiago de Compostela. The many monasteries served as focal points for settlement in the Middle Ages.

Seigneurial power developed in the 10th century and made a profound impression on the landscape. Land allotment followed the patterns of feudal society and strongly fortified residences were built by the overlords. These, too, acted as focal points for settlement. The Loire Valley was a frontier zone during the Hundred Years' War and the scene of many confrontations between French and English. The castles were rebuilt and extended to become massive fortresses, the forerunners of the châteaux of today.

The ever-present danger to Paris from the English during the War resulted in the Royal court spending long periods at Tours. With the end of the War in the mid-15th century the Valley was an ideal place for Humanism and the Renaissance to take root in France. This involved inter alia the dismantling of the massive medieval fortresses and their reconstruction as palaces for pleasure and recreation.

The 17th-18th centuries saw the development of a secular commercial economy based on industry, crafts, trade, shipping, the river, and the towns alongside the feudal survival of the Ancien Régime. The late 18th century also saw the first water-management controls introduced in the Valley; these were intensified throughout the 19th century.

The romantic representation of the Valley in the 19th century by writers and painters led to the Loire becoming a magnet for tourists, first from France, then Europe, and then in the 20th century the rest of the world. This interest in the scenic qualities of the Valley and its monuments encouraged efforts to preserve the heritage of the landscape, in the form of its monuments, its towns, and its rural structure.

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation
Notes
  • The "Chateau and Estate of Chambord", which was previously inscribed on the World Heritage List, is part of the "Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes".

Activities (1)