1.         Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex (Thailand) (N 590rev)

Year of inscription on the World Heritage List  2005

Criteria  (x)

Year(s) of inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger  N/A

Previous Committee Decisions  see page http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/590/documents/

International Assistance

Requests approved: 0
Total amount approved: USD 0
For details, see page http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/590/assistance/

UNESCO Extra-budgetary Funds

N/A

Previous monitoring missions

February-March 2012: Joint UNESCO/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission; January 2014: IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission; December 2016: IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission 

Factors affecting the property identified in previous reports

Illustrative material  see page http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/590/

Conservation issues presented to the World Heritage Committee in 2017

From 13 to 19 December 2016, an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission visited the property, and on 30 January 2017, the State Party submitted a report on its state of conservation. Both reports are available at https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/590/documents. The State Party responds to the Committee’s decisions as follows:

Analysis and Conclusions of the World Heritage Centre and IUCN

The 3rd Regional Dialogue held in March 2017, which saw the participation of a large number of international organizations, including IUCN, resulted in further commitments by the participating countries to implement the CITES Appendix II listing of Siamese Rosewood, including by developing a Regional Strategy and Action Plan, to ensure the survival of this species. It is recommended that the Committee commend the State Party for the leadership demonstrated in strengthening international cooperation to address illegal logging and trade of Siamese Rosewood, and that it encourage the State Party to continue its efforts in that regard, in particular to strengthen international cooperation on law enforcement and the prosecution of cases.

The December 2016 mission recognized the State Party’s efforts to address illegal logging in collaboration with international partners, and considered that the application of the NCAPS, which is based on camera traps sending alerts to rangers as soon as they are triggered, could make a step change in the effectiveness of actions. Nevertheless, the mission also noted that local media reports about legal actions and seizures of rosewood around the property both during and after the mission indicated that, while the number of criminal cases related to illegal logging is showing a decline, it continues to occur regularly. It is therefore recommended that the Committee encourage the State Party to continue its efforts to implement the Action Plan, in close collaboration with international partners, and take into account the recommendations made by the mission in that regard.

It is also recommended that the Committee note with appreciation the State Party’s confirmation that no new cases of resort development have been recorded inside the property since December 2014, along with the progress reported with the ongoing investigations of cases of encroachment and with the restoration of encroached land. Nevertheless, the mission noted that existing encroachment continues to be a major challenge in parts of the property, and it is therefore recommended that the Committee request the State Party to continue its efforts to implement the recommendations made by the 2014 Reactive Monitoring mission regarding this issue and to report specifically on progress achieved.

The mission further noted the State Party’s commitment to avoid and mitigate impacts on the property’s OUV from the expansion of Highway 304, as requested by the Committee (Decision 39 COM 7B.17), and from the construction of the Huay Samong Dam, but raised concerns about the fact that the proposed expansion of Highway 348 and the proposed Huay Satone and Lam Prayathan dam projects, all within the property, are still being proposed by the Department of Highways and the Royal Irrigation Department, respectively. It is recommended that the Committee request the State Party to assess alternatives to the expansion of Highway 348 that avoid negative impacts on OUV, and to permanently cancel plans for any construction of dams with reservoirs inside the property’s boundaries. It is further recommended that the Committee request the State Party to also fully implement all the other recommendations of the 2016 mission.

Finally, the mission concluded that the overall state of conservation of the property remains good, as demonstrated by healthy and growing populations of a number of key wildlife species. Therefore, and provided that the State Party’s efforts to halt illegal logging of Siamese Rosewood continue, the property’s inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger is not recommended at this stage. However, it is recommended that the Committee request the State Party to submit a report on the state of conservation of the property by 1 February 2018, for examination by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, to confirm continued progress. If in three years’ time (at the 44th session of the Committee, following expiration of the Action Plan in 2019), the State Party cannot convincingly prove that the situation has improved, or if at any time there is evidence that the present situation regarding illegal logging of Siamese Rosewood deteriorates further or that other valuable species start to be targeted by logging or poaching, it is recommended that the Committee reconsider whether immediate inclusion of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger is warranted, in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines

Decision Adopted: 41 COM 7B.32

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/17/41.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 40 COM 7B.90, adopted at its 40th session (Istanbul/UNESCO, 2016),
  3. Commends the State Party for the leadership demonstrated in strengthening international cooperation to address illegal logging and trade of Siamese Rosewood and its efforts to halt illegal logging in the property, in collaboration with international partners, and encourages the State Party to continue its efforts to implement the Action Plan to Prevent and Suppress Illegal Logging and Trade of Siamese Rosewood in Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex 2014-2019 (hereafter “the Action Plan”) and further strengthen international cooperation, in particular on law enforcement and prosecution of cases;
  4. Considers that, following the completion of the Action Plan in 2019, an improvement in the situation regarding illegal logging of Siamese Rosewood should be convincingly demonstrated by the Committee’s 44th session in 2020, and also considers that, if at any time there is evidence that the situation deteriorates or that other valuable species start to be targeted by logging or poaching, this would represent a potential danger to the property, in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
  5. Noting with appreciation that no new cases of resort development have been recorded inside the property since December 2014, as well as the progress reported with ongoing cases and with the restoration of encroached land, requests the State Party to continue to implement the recommendations made by the 2014 Reactive Monitoring mission regarding encroachment and to report specifically on progress achieved;
  6. Also notes with appreciation the State Party’s commitment and efforts to avoid any negative impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property from the ongoing expansion of Highway 304 and the construction of the Huay Samong Dam;
  7. Notes with concern that the expansion of Highway 348 and the construction of the Huay Satone dam within the property are still being proposed, and also requests the State Party to assess alternatives to the expansion of Highway 348 that would avoid negative impacts on OUV, and to permanently cancel plans for any construction of dams with reservoirs inside the property’s boundaries, including the Huay Satone and the Lam Prayathan dam projects;
  8. Further requests the State Party to fully implement all the recommendations of the 2016 Reactive Monitoring mission;
  9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2018, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for evaluation by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, and if, in their opinion, progress is insufficient, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018;
  10. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2019, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and on progress towards achieving the targets of the Action Plan, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 44th session in 2020.