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University and Historic Precinct of Alcalá de Henares

University and Historic Precinct of Alcalá de Henares

Founded by Cardinal Jiménez de Cisneros in the early 16th century, Alcalá de Henares was the world's first planned university city. It was the original model for the Civitas Dei (City of God), the ideal urban community which Spanish missionaries brought to the Americas. It also served as a model for universities in Europe and elsewhere.

Université et quartier historique d'Alcalá de Henares

Alcalá de Henares est la première ville universitaire planifiée au monde, fondée par le cardinal Jiménez de Cisneros au début du XVIe siècle. Elle fut le modèle de la Civitas Dei (cité de Dieu), communauté urbaine idéale que les missionnaires espagnols exportèrent aux Amériques, et le modèle des universités d'Europe et d'ailleurs.

جامعة آلكالا دي هيناريس وحيّها التاريخي

آلكالا دي هيناريس هي أوّل مدن العالم لناحية التخطيط المُدني أسسها الكاردينال خيمينيز دي سيسنيروس مطلع القرن السادس عشر. وكانت مثالا اما سمي "مدينة الله" في ذلك الوقت وهو أسرة حضريةًّ مثاليّة كانت الإرساليّات الإسبانيّة تصدرها إلى الأمريكيّتين، كما كانت نموذجا لجامعات أوروبا والعالم.

source: UNESCO/ERI

埃纳雷斯堡大学城及历史区

埃纳雷斯堡是世界上第一座被规划成为大学城的城市,由西奈罗斯红衣大主教于16世纪早期建立。埃纳雷斯堡是后来西班牙传教士带到美洲的理想城市社区(又被称为上帝之城)的范本,同时它也为欧洲乃至全世界的大学提供了设计模型。

source: UNESCO/ERI

Университет и историческая часть города Алькала-де-Энарес

Основанная кардиналом Хименесом де Сиснерос в начале XVI в., Алькала-де-Энарес была первым в мире специально спланированным университетским городом. Она была исходной моделью для Чивитас-Деи (Города Господа) – идеального городского сообщества, которое испанские миссионеры принесли в Америку. Также она послужила образцом для университетов в Европе и других районах мира.

source: UNESCO/ERI

Universidad y barrio histórico de Alcalá de Henares

Fundada por el cardenal Jiménez de Cisneros a principios del siglo XVI, Alcalá de Henares fue la primera ciudad universitaria planificada del mundo. Fue el ejemplo de la Civitas Dei (Ciudad de Dios), comunidad urbana ideal que los misioneros españoles trasplantaron a América, y sirvió de modelo a toda una serie de universidades en Europa y otras partes del mundo.

source: UNESCO/ERI

アルカラ・デ・エナレスの大学と歴史地区

source: NFUAJ

Universiteit en historisch district van Alcalá de Henares

Alcalá de Henares was de eerste stad die puur ontworpen en gebouwd is als de zetel van een universiteit. De universiteitsstad was de eerste materiële uitwerking van de Stad van God (Civitas Dei, het concept van de ideale stad) en z'n ontwerp werd verspreid over de hele wereld. De stad heeft ook bijgedragen aan de intellectuele ontwikkeling van de mensheid door de taalkundige ontwikkelingen die er plaatsvonden, waaronder het definiëren van de Spaanse taal. Daarnaast was de invloed van Alcalá de Henares groot door het werk van haar ‘zoon’ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, die het meesterwerk El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha schreef.

Source: unesco.nl

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University and Historic Precinct of Alcalá de Henares © UNESCO
Justification for Inscription

Criterion (ii): Alcalá de Henares was the first city to be designed and built solely as the seat of a university, and was to serve as the model for other centres of learning in Europe and the Americas.

Criterion (iv): The concept of the ideal city, the City of God (Civitas Dei), was first given material expression in Alcalá de Henares, from where it was widely diffused throughout the world.

Criterion (vi): The contribution of Alcalá de Henares to the intellectual development of humankind finds expression in its materialization of the Civitas Dei, in the advances in linguistics that took place there, not least in the definition of the Spanish language, and through the work of its great son, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra and his masterpiece, Don Quixote.

Long Description

Alcalá de Henares was the first city to be designed and built solely as the seat of a university, and was to serve as the model for other centres of learning in Europe and the Americas. The concept of the ideal city, the City of God (Civitas Dei ), was first given material expression there, from where it was widely diffused throughout the world.

The Henares river valley has been settled by humankind since the Neolithic period. This strategic site in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula inevitably led to the establishment of a Roman town, Complutum. It was here that the child saints, Justus and Pastor, were martyred in AD 304, and their tomb outside the walls of the Roman town became a sanctuary round which the present historic centre developed. It was an Episcopal See during the Visigothic period, and became part of the Emirate of Cordoba when the Moors overran most of Spain; a fortress known as Al-Qal'at was built, and a small settlement grew up.

After it was recaptured in 1118, the territory of Alcalá was granted to the Archbishopric of Toledo; the city expanded and the medieval fortified settlement took shape with the Archbishop's Palace at its centre. To the south was the Christian quarter, with its church, the Jewish quarter lay to the east, with the Arab quarter to the north. During the late 15th century, the urban core expanded with the construction outside the walls of the Franciscan Convent of San Diego, which attracted settlement around it. Following an attack by the King of Navarre a new, stronger wall was built to enclose the areas of expansion to the south and east. The town prospered until 1496, when the Jews were expelled from Spain by royal edict, taking with them their commercial activities. However, the urban fabric remained intact, making possible the creation of a new university city. Cardinal Ximénez de Cisneros began by founding the Colegio de San Ildefonso, at the present in the heart of the university city. It was built in 1537-53 by Rodrigo Gil de Hontañón, one of the greatest masters of the Plateresque style, and is notable for its grand facade, which symbolizes in its elaborate decoration the harmonious conjuncture of the Christian religion, of learning, and of imperial power.

Unlike other university cities in Europe, Alcalá de Henares did not develop slowly, adapting itself to its urban surroundings. From the start it was conceived by Cisneros as an entity, which took over a partly abandoned medieval town and converted it into a city whose function was solely that of a university. This involved the creation of houses to lodge professors and students and the provision of services such as a sewer system and paved streets. The little Chapel of St Justus was rebuilt as a church and given the title 'Magistral'. More centres of learning were added progressively: there were eventually to be 25 Colegios Menores, while eight large monasteries were also colleges of the university.

The primary objective of the university was to train administrators for the Church and for the Spanish Empire. The Complutense Polyglot Bible (1514-17) illustrates the type of work that began in Alcalá: a masterpiece of typography, it took ten years to complete and established the bases of modern linguistic analysis as well as the accepted structure for dictionaries. This work was supported by that of Antonio de Nebrija, author of the first European grammar of a Romance language, published in 1492, which was to be the model for similar grammars in many European and Native American languages. From the mid-17th century, however, the number of students, estimated to have been over 12,000 in the 16th century, begin to decline in favour of Madrid, where the Church had begun to establish university colleges and convents on the Alcalá model. In 1836 the university was transferred to Madrid, where it survives today under the title of the Complutense University of Madrid. In 1974 the university established a School of Economics in Alcalá, and the present University of Alcalá de Henares was inaugurated.

The University Precinct begins at the Plaza Cervantes and extends to the east of the medieval city. It was enclosed by demolishing part of the earlier medieval walls and prolonging them round the new urban development. The walled medieval precinct has the Iglesia Magistral (cathedral), a Gothic structure, at its core, from which the street network radiates, merging into the former Jewish and Arab quarters. To the north-west is the ecclesiastical precinct, surrounded by its own walls; at its heart is the Archbishop's Palace.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC
Historical Description

The Henares river valley has been settled by humankind since the Neolithic period. Following the Roman colonization, this strategic site in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula inevitably led to the establishment of a Roman town, Complutum, some 1.5km from the present-day city centre. It was here that the child saints, Justus and Pastor, were martyred in AD 304, and their tomb outside the walls of the Roman town became a sanctuary round which the present historic centre developed.

It was an episcopal see during the Visigothic period, and became part of the Emirate of Córdoba when the Moors overran most of the Iberian Peninsula in the 8th century. The town was relatively insignificant during the Moorish period. A fortress, known as Al-Qal'at ("The Castle"), was built during the 12th century some 4km upstream of the Roman town, and a small settlement grew up around it.

After it was recaptured in 1118, the territory of Alcalá was granted to the Archbishopric of Toledo. The city expanded under successive prelates and the medieval fortified settlement took shape. The core was the episcopal precinct, with the Archbishop's Palace at its centre. To the south was the Christian quarter, with its church, the Jewish quarter lay to the east, along the porticoed Calle Mayor, with the Arab quarter to the north. What is now the Plaza de Cervantes was an open area to the eastern edge of the town, the site of annual fairs and tournaments.

During the late 15th century the urban core expanded with the construction outside the walls of the Franciscan Convent of San Diego, which attracted settlement around it. Following an attack by the King of Navarre a new, stronger wall was built to enclose the areas of expansion to the south and east. The town prospered until 1496, when the Jews were expelled from Spain by Royal edict, taking with them their commercial activities. However, the urban fabric remained intact, making possible the creation of a new university city.

This was the brainchild of Cardinal Ximénez de Cisneros, who began by founding the Colegio de San Ildefonso. Unlike other university cities in Europe, such as Bologna, Oxford, Paris, and Salamanca, Alcalá de Henares did not develop slowly, adapting itself to its urban surroundings. From the start it was conceived by Cisneros as an entity, which took over a partly abandoned medieval town and converted it into a city whose function was solely that of a university. This involved the creation of houses to lodge professors and students and the provision of services such as a sewer system and paved streets. The little Chapel of St Justus was rebuilt as a church and given the title of "Magistral" whereby its canons became Masters (Magistri) of the University. More centres of learning were added progressively: there were eventually to be twenty-five Colegios Menores (Lesser Colleges), whilst eight large monasteries were also colleges of the University. This model of "university colleges" and "university convents" was to be adopted widely in the New World, as well as elsewhere in Spain.

In the New Privileged Law of 1509 Cisneros created an effective legal framework for his vision. The primary objective of the university was to train administrators for the Church and for the Spanish Empire. The Complutense Polyglot Bible (1514-17) illustrates the type of work that began in Alcalá: a masterpiece of typography, it took ten years to complete and established the bases of modern linguistic analysis as well as the accepted structure for dictionaries. This work was supported by that of Antonio de Nebrija, who was the author of the first European grammar of a Romance language (Gramática de la Lengua Castellana), published in 1492, which was to be the model for similar grammars in many European and native American languages. The New Laws of the Indies were prepared in Alcalá and published there in 1542, the work of the law faculties of the University.

From the mid 17th century, however, saw the number of students, estimated to have been over 12,000 in the 16th century, begin to decline in favour of Madrid, where the Church had begun to establish university colleges and convents on the Alcalá model. This process continued until 1836 when, following the disenfranchisement of church and university properties by Mendizabal, the University was transferred to Madrid, where it survives today under the title of the Complutense University of Madrid.

Alcalá de Henares found itself as a result deprived of its raison d'être. The historic buildings of the University, and the urban fabric of the city itself, were at risk, but they were preserved by the actions of the citizens of Alcalá themselves. In a unique act the Society of Joint Owners (Sociedad de Condueños) purchased most of the University buildings and preserved them, in some cases unoccupied, to await the return of the University to the city. Others were converted for military use, retaining their principal features intact.

The city began to expand with the arrival of the railway in 1856. It did not develop substantially, however, until the 1960s, when there was heavy domestic immigration from other parts of Spain to what was becoming an industrial centre. Fortunately, this development, largely unplanned and uncontrolled, did not affect the historic centre, still largely owned by the Society of Joint Owners or the army and further protected by being declared an Historic Area in 1968.

Calls for the return of the University began in 1970, when the Madrid institution had begun using "Complutense" in its title. In 1974 that university established a School of Economics in Alcalá. It was not until three years later that the present University of Alcalá de Henares was inaugurated.

In 1985 a covenant was signed for the military buildings to be renovated and restored to their original use, and the seven buildings that comprised the original foundation of Cisneros were handed over by the Society of Joint Owners. Other historic buildings were purchased and integrated into the University or given associated cultural functions.

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation