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Episcopal Complex of the Euphrasian Basilica in the Historic Centre of Poreč

Episcopal Complex of the Euphrasian Basilica in the Historic Centre of Poreč

The group of religious monuments in Porec, where Christianity was established as early as the 4th century, constitutes the most complete surviving complex of its type. The basilica, atrium, baptistery and episcopal palace are outstanding examples of religious architecture, while the basilica itself combines classical and Byzantine elements in an exceptional manner.

Ensemble épiscopal de la basilique euphrasienne dans le centre historique de Poreč

Le groupe de monuments religieux de Porec, lieux de culte de la chrétienté dès le IVe siècle, constitue l'ensemble préservé le plus complet de ce type. La basilique, l'atrium, le baptistère et le palais épiscopal sont de remarquables exemples d'architecture religieuse, tandis que la basilique elle-même associe de manière exceptionnelle des éléments classiques et byzantins.

مجموعة أسقفيّة لبازيليك السيدة العذارء في وسط بوريك التاريخي

تشكّل مجموعة النصب التاريخيّة في بوريك، دار عبادة الديانة المسيحيّة منذ القرن الرابع، المجموعة الأكثر شموليّةً المحفوظة من هذا النوع. وتشكّل البازيليك والساحة وبيت العماد والقصر الأسقفي أمثلةً استثنائيّةً عن الهندسة الدينيّة في حين أنّ البازيليك نفسها تجمع بصورة استثنائيّة بين عناصر كلاسيكيّة وبيزنطيّة.

source: UNESCO/ERI

波雷奇历史中心的尤弗拉西苏斯大教堂建筑群

波雷奇的宗教建筑群是基督教徒于4世纪初建造的,是同类建筑中保存最完整的建筑群。长方形的大教堂、正厅、洗礼池和主教殿是宗教建筑的典型代表,同时长方形的大教堂本身还以一种特殊的方式融合了古典与拜占庭风格。

source: UNESCO/ERI

Комплекс базилики епископа Ефразия в историческом центре города Пореч

Группа религиозных памятников в городе Пореч, где христианство установилось еще в IV в., является самым целостным из всех дошедших до наших дней подобных ансамблей. Базилика, атриум, баптистерий, епископский дворец – все это выдающиеся примеры религиозной архитектуры. В архитектуре базилики своеобразно сочетаются классические и византийские элементы.

source: UNESCO/ERI

Conjunto episcopal de la basílica eufrasiana en el centro histórico de Poreč

Lugares de culto de la cristiandad desde el siglo IV, los monumentos religiosos de Poreč forman el conjunto conservado más completo en su género. La basílica, el atrio, el baptisterio y el palacio episcopal son ejemplos notables de arquitectura religiosa. En la basílica se puede observar una asociación excepcional entre elementos clásicos y bizantinos.

source: UNESCO/ERI

ポレッチ歴史地区のエウフラシウス聖堂建築群

source: NFUAJ

Bisschopscomplex van de Euphrasius basiliek in het historisch centrum van Poreč

Dit bisschopscomplex bestaat uit een groep religieuze monumenten in het historisch centrum van Poreč, waar het christendom zich al in de 4e eeuw vestigde. Het is uniek omdat alle elementen van het vroegchristelijke complex bewaard zijn gebleven. De basiliek, het atrium, de doopkapel en het bisschopspaleis zijn voorbeelden van religieuze architectuur. De basiliek werd in de 6e eeuw door Euphrasius gebouwd en de bouwstijl combineert klassieke en Byzantijnse elementen. De vroegste fase van de basiliek – een eenvoudige kapel in een groot Romeins woonhuis waar de botten van de plaatselijke martelaar Maurus werden geplaatst – is gedateerd rond 313.

Source: unesco.nl

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Episcopal Complex of the Euphrasian Basilica in the Historic Centre of Porec © Ko Hon Chiu Vincent
Justification for Inscription

The Committee decided to inscribe this property on the basis of criteria (ii), (iii) and (iv), considering that the Episcopal complex of the Euphrasian Basilica in the historic centre of Porec is an outstanding example of an early Christian episcopal ensemble that is exceptional by virtue of its completeness and its unique Basilican cathedral.

Long Description

The Euphrasian Basilica in Poreč is the most integrally preserved early Christian cathedral complex in the region and unique by virtue of the fact that all the basic components - church, memorial chapel, atrium, baptistry and episcopal palace - are preserved. The Basilica, including its earlier phases (oratory, basilica gemina and basilica proper), is a characteristic example of 5th- and 6th-century religious architecture, showing significant Byzantine influence

Churches were established in Poreč (the Municipium Parentium of the Roman province of Histria) between the early 4th and mid-6th centuries. No fewer than four churches were built in succession on the north coast of the low peninsula where the town was situated; only the latest of these, the Basilica of Euphrasius, has survived. The Euphrasian Basilica in Poreč is the most integrally preserved early Christian cathedral complex and unique by virtue of the fact that all the basic components - church, memorial chapel, atrium, baptistry and episcopal palace - are preserved. The earliest phase, a simple oratory within a large Roman private house in which the bones of the local martyr, Maurus, were placed, is dated to around 313. This was restored and enlarged with the addition of a second hall (basilicae geminae ) later in the 4th century, but remained a simple structure with a rectangular plan. In the 5th century a new church was built on the site. It took the characteristic form for Istria and Noricum. The present church was built in the mid-6th century to the orders of the bishop whose name it retains, Euphrasius.

The basilica built by Euphrasius in the 6th century is three-aisled, with a large central apse flanked by two shallower side apses. The walls on the northern, western and southern sides are those of the earlier basilica on the site, and the bases of the two rows of nine columns that divide up the interior are also from that structure. The plain columns are surmounted by capitals with different forms of carved ornamentation (the Byzantine version of Corinthian capitals: inverted basket capitals; fretted capitals with animal and vegetable motifs above), but identical in opposite pairs. They are linked by arcading with stucco ornamentation, which survives intact on the north side, where traces of the original polychrome paint are still discernible. The 15th-century frescoes are also still visible on the western wall and in the lunette over the southern apse. The lower part of the wall is decorated with coloured stone and mother-of-pearl. Above there is a stucco band, below the mosaics, which occupy the spaces around the four windows, the interior of the semi-dome and the front wall. The central feature inside the dome is a representation of the Virgin Mary, holding the Christ Child and flanked by angels, local martyrs and Bishop Euphrasius. Only a small portion of the original floor mosaics survive, in the south apse. The exteriors of the walls are plastered and divided by pilaster strips, connected by blind arcades. The whole of the top section of the west front of the building, above the cloistered narthex, was originally covered with mosaics, but much of this decoration has disappeared.

In addition to his new basilica, Euphrasius erected a complex of associated buildings - an atrium beyond the narrow narthex of the basilica, a baptistry at the end of the atrium, a monumental episcopal palace between the atrium and the sea, and a small memorial chapel to the north-east of the basilica. All these buildings were richly ornamented with mosaics, alabaster, marble, mother-of-pearl and stucco, in the lavish tradition of the Byzantine 'Golden Age' during the reign of Justinian. Later additions to the complex were the Kanonika (Canon's House) of 1257, the 16th-century bell tower, and some minor buildings such as the sacristy (15th century) and two chapels (17th and 19th centuries respectively).

The Episcopal Complex is an integral part of the historic centre of Poreč, which has preserved its Roman street pattern to a considerable extent.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC
Historical Description

Churches were established in Porec (the Municipium Parentium of the Roman province of Histria) between the early 4th and mid-6th centuries. No fewer than four were built in succession on the north coast of the low peninsula where the town was situated; only the latest of these, the basilica of Euphrasius, has survived.

The earliest phase, a simple oratory within a large Roman private house in which the bones of the local martyr, Maurus, were placed, is dated to around 313.

This was restored and enlarged with the addition of a second hall (the basihcae geminae) later in the 4th century, but remained a simple structure with a rectangular plan. In the 5th century a new church was built on the site. It took the form of a three-aisled basilica without an apse, characteristic for Istria and Noricum.

The present church was built in the mid-6th century to the orders of the bishop whose name it retains, Euphrasius. In his dedicatory inscription in the apse mosaic, Euphrasius comments that the church that he found on this site was ruinous and devoid of ornamentation; however, recent studies have established that this was a somewhat exaggerated statement, since the new building incorporated three of the perimeter walls of the earlier structure and traces of mosaics from this phase have been discovered.

In addition to his new basilica, Euphrasius erected a complex of associated buildings - an atrium beyond the narrow narthex of the basilica, a baptistery at the end of the atrium, a monumental episcopal palace between the atrium and the sea, and a small memorial chapel to the north-east of the basilica. All these buildings were richly ornamented with mosaics, alabaster, marble, mother-of-pearl, and stucco, in the lavish tradition of the Byzantine "Golden Age" during the reign of Justinian.

Later additions to the complex were the "Kanonika" (Canon's House) of 1257, the 16th century belltower, and some minor buildings such as the sacristy (15th century) and two chapels (17th and 19th centuries respectively).

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation