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Völklingen Ironworks

Völklingen Ironworks

The ironworks, which cover some 6 ha, dominate the city of Völklingen. Although they have recently gone out of production, they are the only intact example, in the whole of western Europe and North America, of an integrated ironworks that was built and equipped in the 19th and 20th centuries and has remained intact.

Usine sidérurgique de Völklingen

Le complexe sidérurgique, qui couvre 6 hectares, surplombe la ville de Völklingen, dans la Sarre. C'est, dans tout le monde occidental européen et nord-américain, la seule usine sidérurgique intégrée construite et équipée aux XIXe et XXe siècles qui ait fermé ses portes récemment et qui soit restée intacte.

مصنع الصلب في فولكلينغن

إن مجمّع مصانع الصلب الذي يغطي 6 هكتارات يشرف على مدينة فولكلينغن في منطقة السار. إنه مصنع الصلب الوحيد في العالم الاوروبي الغربي والأميركي الشمالي المتكامل الذي بُِني وجُهّز بين القرنين التاسع عشر والعشرين والذي أغلق أبوابه مؤخراً وقد بقي على حاله.

source: UNESCO/ERI

弗尔克林根钢铁厂

弗尔克林根钢铁厂占地6公顷,构成了弗尔克林根市的主体部分。尽管这个工厂已经停产,但它仍然是整个西欧和北美地区现存唯一一处保存完好的综合性钢铁厂遗址,向人们展示着19世纪和20世纪时期建造和装备的钢铁厂风貌。

source: UNESCO/ERI

Железоделательный завод в городе Фëльклинген

Железоделательный завод, занимающий территорию в шесть гектаров, доминирует в облике города Фëльклинген. Хотя производство на нем недавно прекратилось, он остается единственным сохранившимся в целости железоделательным заводом из всех построенных в XIX и XX вв. в Западной Европе и Северной Америке.

source: UNESCO/ERI

Fábrica siderúrgica de Völklingen

Este complejo siderúrgico tiene una superficie de seis hectáreas y domina la ciudad de Völklingen, en el Sarre. Construida y equipada en los siglos XIX y XX, esta fábrica siderúrgica integrada dejó de funcionar recientemente y es la única de toda Europa Occidental y América del Norte que ha permanecido intacta.

source: UNESCO/ERI

フェルクリンゲン製鉄所

source: NFUAJ

IJzersmelterij van Völklingen

De ijzersmelterij beslaat zo’n zes hectare en domineert de stad Völklingen. Hoewel de productie pas in 1986 werd stilgelegd, is dit het enige intact gebleven voorbeeld – in heel West-Europa en Noord-Amerika – van een geïntegreerde ijzersmelterij die werd gebouwd en uitgerust in de 19e en 20e eeuw. De eerste hoogoven werd gebouwd in 1882-1883, er kwam een cokesfabriek in 1897 en in 1900 installaties om de hete luchtstroom in de hoogoven te blazen. Eind 19e eeuw was Völklingen een van de meest productieve fabrieken in Europa en Duitslands grootste vervaardiger van stalen balken. De smelterij was een model voor de hele wereld.

Source: unesco.nl

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Völklingen © Jérôme COSS
Long Description

Although the Völklingen Ironworks went out of production comparatively recently, they are the only intact example, in the whole of western Europe and North America, of an integrated ironworks that was built and equipped in the 19th and 20th centuries and has remained intact. Historically this plant was a model for many other similar installations throughout the world.

The first works was established on the site by the Cologne engineer Julius Buch in 1873 to produce girder iron and railway sleepers by the puddling process from Luxembourg ore. It ceased operations in 1879 and was acquired by Karl Rüchling two years later. The first blast furnace (now No. 3) was built in 1882-83, and four more furnaces were added between 1885 and 1893. A coking plant was added in 1897, and three years later the first gas-blowing engines were introduced. Völklingen was the first ironworks in the world to use blast-furnace gas on a large scale to drive enormous blowers providing blast to the furnaces. The initial pair of engines was eventually increased to nine. By the end of the century Völklingen had become one of the most productive works in Europe and Germany's largest producer of steel beams.

A sixth blast furnace was built in 1903, and in 1911 the new charging platform was constructed, supplied by an electrically driven suspended conveyor system for coke and ore; this was the largest system of its kind when it was built. Völklingen was the first ironworks in the world to take dry gas purification technology beyond the experimental stage, installing the plant in 1911. The final major addition to the Völklingen complex was the large ore-sintering plant; after experimenting with ladle-type sintering, the company installed a large belt-type system in 1928-30. This pioneering plant became a model for many other similar installations throughout the world. In 1935 the coking plant was rebuilt and enlarged.

From the end of the Second World War until pig-iron production ceased in 1986, only minor modernization and maintenance took place. The gas-blowing engine hall, with its unique battery of machines, the dry gas purification plant, the suspended conveyor system, and the sinter plant were all pioneering installations in their day. These processes influenced pig-iron production throughout the world.

The ironmaking complex, which covers some 6 ha, dominates the townscape of Völklingen. It contains installations covering every stage in the pig-iron production process, from raw materials handling and processing equipment for coal and iron ore through to blast-furnace iron production, with all the ancillary equipment such as gas purification and blowing equipment. The installations are exactly as they were when production ceased in 1986.

The overall appearance is that of an ironworks of the 193Os, as no new installations were added after the rebuilding of the coking plant. There is considerable evidence of the history of the works in the form of individual items that have preserved substantial elements of their original form. Large sections of the frames and platforms of the blast furnaces, for example, have not altered since their installation at the turn of the century.

Much of the original coking plant survives, despite the 1935 reconstruction, notably the coal tower of 1898. Six of the gas blowing engines, built between 1905 and 1914, are preserved, as are the suspended conveyor system of 1911 and the dry gas purification plant of the same time. In addition, remains of Buch's puddled ironworks of 1873 are preserved in the power station below the blast furnaces.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC
Historical Description

The first works was established on the site by the Cologne engineer Julius Buch in 1873 to produce girder iron and railway sleepers by the puddling process from Luxembourg ore. It ceased operations in 1879 and was acquired by Kart Rochling two years later. The first blast-furnace (now No 3) was built in 1882/3, and four more furnaces were added between 1885 and 1893. A coking plant was added in 1897, and three years later the first gas-blowing engines were introduced. Volklingen was the first ironworks in the world to use furnace gas on a large scale to drive enormous blowers providing blast to the furnaces. The initial pair of engines was eventually increased to nine. By the end of the century Volklingen had become one of the most productive works in Europe and Germany's largest producer of steel beams.

A sixth blast-furnace was built in 1903, and in 1911 the new charging platform was constructed, supplied by an electrically driven suspended conveyor system for coke and ore; this was the largest system of its kind when it was built. Volklingen was the first ironworks in the world to take dry gas purification technology beyond the experimental stage, installing the plant in 1911. The final major addition to the Volldingen complex was the large ore-sintering plant; after experimenting with ladle-type sintering, the company installed a large belt-type system in 1928-30. This pioneering plant became a model for many other similar installations throughout the world. In 1935 the coking plant was rebuilt and enlarged. From the end of World War II until pig-iron production ceased in 1986 only minor modernization and maintenance took place.

The gas-blowing engine hall, with its unique battery of machines, the dry gas purification plant, the suspended conveyor system, and the sinter plant were all pioneering installations in their day. These processes influenced pig-iron production throughout the world.

 

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation