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18th-Century Royal Palace at Caserta with the Park, the Aqueduct of Vanvitelli, and the San Leucio Complex

18th-Century Royal Palace at Caserta with the Park, the Aqueduct of Vanvitelli, and the San Leucio Complex

The monumental complex at Caserta, created by the Bourbon king Charles III in the mid-18th century to rival Versailles and the Royal Palace in Madrid, is exceptional for the way in which it brings together a magnificent palace with its park and gardens, as well as natural woodland, hunting lodges and a silk factory. It is an eloquent expression of the Enlightenment in material form, integrated into, rather than imposed on, its natural setting.

Palais royal du XVIIIe siècle de Caserte avec le parc, l’aqueduc de Vanvitelli et l’ensemble de San Leucio

L'ensemble monumental de Caserte, créé par Charles III (Carlo Borbone) au milieu du XVIIIe siècle pour rivaliser avec Versailles et le palais royal de Madrid, est exceptionnel dans la manière dont il réunit un somptueux palais avec son parc et ses jardins mais aussi une partie naturelle boisée, des pavillons de chasse et un complexe industriel pour la production de la soie. C'est une évocation éloquente et concrète de la période des Lumières, intégrée plutôt qu'imposée à son paysage naturel.

القصر الملكي للقرن الثامن عشر في كازيرتا مع الحديقة وقناة فانفيتيلّي ومجموعة سان لوتشيو

إنها مجموعة نصب كازيرتا أنشأها شارل الثالث (كارلو بروبوني) في منتصف القرن الثامن عشر لتنافس فرساي والقصر الملكي في مدريد، وهي مجموعة استثنائية بطريقة جمعها بين قصر فخم وحدائقه وأيضًا جزء طبيعي مشجَّر، ومساحات للصيد ومجمَّع صناعي لإنتاج الحرير. إنها لتعبير بليغ وملموس عن حقبة الأنوار مندمجة بمحيطها الطبيعي ليست مفروضة عليه.

source: UNESCO/ERI

卡塞塔的18世纪花园皇宫、凡韦特里水渠和圣莱乌西建筑群

卡塞塔地区的综合名胜群是波旁王朝国王查理斯三世为了与凡尔赛宫和马德里皇宫争奇斗美而在18世纪中叶修建的。这一建筑群别出心裁地把豪华的宫殿及其园林和花园、天然林地、打猎用的山林小屋和生产丝绸的工业设施完美地结合在一起。名胜群充分体现了启蒙运动在建筑领域的影响:以物质形式融入自然景观,实现两者完美的结合,而不是将启蒙思想强加于自然景观。

source: UNESCO/ERI

Королевский дворец XVIII в. с парком в Казерте, акведук Ванвителли и фабричный поселок Сан-Леучо

Монументальный комплекс в Казерте, созданный королем Карлом III Бурбоном в середине ХVIII в. в попытке соперничать с Версалем и Королевским дворцом в Мадриде, является исключительным примером сочетания великолепного дворца с окружающими его парками и садами, а также с природным лесным ландшафтом, охотничьими домиками и шелковой фабрикой. Это яркое выражение эпохи Просвещения в материальной форме, интегрированной в природное окружение.

source: UNESCO/ERI

Palacio Real del siglo XVIII de Caserta con el parque, el acueducto de Vanvitelli y el conjunto de San Leucio

Construido a mediados del siglo XVIII por Carlos III de Borbón para rivalizar con Versalles y palacio real de Madrid, el conjunto monumental de Caserta es excepcional por la forma en que conjunta un suntuoso palacio con sus parques y jardines, un bosque natural, una serie de pabellones de caza y una manufactura de seda. Elocuente materialización de las ideas del Siglo de las Luces, Caserta no se impone al paisaje natural circundante, sino que se integra perfectamente en él.

source: UNESCO/ERI

カゼルタの18世紀の王宮と公園、ヴァンヴィテッリの水道橋とサン・レウチョ邸宅群

source: NFUAJ

18e-eeuws Koninklijk paleis in Caserta met park, het aquaduct van Vanvitelli en het San Leucio complex

In 1734 werd Karel III (Carlo Borbone) koning van Napels, een autonoom koninkrijk dat niet langer deel uitmaakte van het Spaanse Rijk. Hij besloot in 1750 om een nieuw koninklijk paleis te bouwen om het paleis van Versailles en het koninklijk paleis te Madrid te overtreffen als symbool van het nieuwe koninkrijk. Het monumentale complex is bijzonder vanwege de manier waarop het een prachtig paleis samenbrengt met haar park en tuinen, alsmede de omliggende natuurlijke bossen, de jachthuizen en een zijdefabriek. Het paleis is een uitgesproken weerspiegeling van de Verlichting in materiële vorm, meer geïntegreerd in dan opgelegd aan de natuurlijke omgeving.

Source: unesco.nl

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18th-Century Royal Palace at Caserta with the Park, the Aqueduct of Vanvitelli, and the San Leucio Complex © UNESCO
Justification for Inscription

The Committee decided to inscribe this property on the basis of criteria (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv), considering that the monumental complex at Caserta, whilst cast in the same mould as other 18th century royal establishments, is exceptional for the broad sweep of its design, incorporating not only an imposing palace and park, but also much of the surrounding natural landscape and an ambitious new town laid out according to the urban planning precepts of its time. The industrial complex of the Belvedere, designed to produce silk, is also of outstanding interest because of the idealistic principles that underlay its original conception and management.

Long Description

The monumental complex at Caserta, while cast in the same mould as other 18th-century royal establishments, is exceptional for the broad sweep of its design, incorporating an imposing palace and park, and also much of the surrounding natural landscape and an ambitious new town laid out according to urban planning precepts of its time. The industrial complex of the Belvedere, designed to produce silk, is also of outstanding interest because of the idealistic principles underlying its original conception and management.

In 1734 Charles III, son of Philip V, became King of Naples, a self-governing kingdom that was no longer part of the Spanish realm. He decided in 1750 to build a new royal palace, to rival the Palace of Versailles. It was designed to be the centre of a new town that would compete with leading European cities. He employed architect Luigi Vanvitelli, then engaged in the restoration o St Peter's in Rome. The Bosco di San Silvestro, on the two hills of Montemaiuolo and Montebriano, was covered with vineyards and orchards when in 1773 Ferdinand IV decided to enclose it and create a hunting park.

The hill of San Leucio takes its name from the Lombard church at its top. A hunting lodge, the Belvedere, had been built at its foot in the 16th century by the Princes of Caserta. The fief had been purchased by Charles Ill, and in 1773 Ferdinand IV initiated work on the Old Hunting Lodge, to be abandoned after the death of his son. In 1778 the king decided to begin the production of silk. His architect, Collecini, converted the building for this purpose, as the centre of a large industrial complex, including a school, accommodation for teachers, silkworm rooms, and facilities for spinning and dyeing the silk. He issued a series of laws in 1789 to regulate the San Leucio Royal Colony: this laid down piecework rates of pay, abolished dowries, and prescribed similar clothing for all the workers, in a form of proto-socialism. During the next decade plans were made for enlargement of the village, and Collecini produced designs for a town, to be known as 'Ferdinandopolis', but this dream was not realized because of the French occupation.

The fishponds in the gardens of the Royal Palace, the Royal Silk Factory and the planned new town all required large amounts of water, and so the Carolino Aqueduct was built (completed in 1769) to bring water from the Fizo spring over a distance of 38 km to the top of Montebriano. In 1744 Charles III acquired the rich Carditello estate. The hunting lodge there was built in 1784, as part of a complex of rural houses and roads radiating fanwise from the main building. This had the royal apartments in the centre and rooms for agricultural and stock-rearing activities on either side.

The Royal Palace is rectangular in plan, with four large interior courtyards intersecting at right angles. It covers 45,000 m2 and its five storeys rise to a height of 36 m. An indication of its scale can be judged from the fact that there are 143 windows on the main facade and the building contains 1,200 rooms and 34 staircases. The building is constructed in brick, the two lower storeys being faced with travertine ashlars. The whole structure is crowned by a central cupola. In front of the main facade is the elliptical parade ground. Inside, there are three octagonal vestibules, aligned on the main axis of the building and acting as fulcrums for the entire complex. The monumental main staircase gives access to the royal apartments, which are decorated and furnished in 18th-century style. The chapel, inspired by that at Versailles, opens out of the lower vestibule. Another noteworthy feature is the Royal Theatre, a superb example of 18th-century design.

The park, which lies behind the palace, was planned by Luigi Vanvitelli but completed by his son Carlo. The main axis is punctuated by a series of Baroque fountains and stretches of water. This magnificent perspective terminates in the Great Fountain, where water cascades down from a height of 150 m into an ornate basin that depicts Diana bathing, observed by the unfortunate Actaeon.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC
Historical Description

In 1734 Charles III (Carlo Borbone), son of Philip V, became King of Naples, a self-governing kingdom that was no longer part of the Spanish realm. He decided in 1750 to build a new royal palace, to rival, and perhaps outdo, the palace of Versailles, as the symbol of the new kingdom. It was designed to be the centre of a new town that would also compete with the leading European cities. He employed the famous architect Luigi Vanvitelli, at that time engaged in the restoration of the Basilica of St Peter's in Rome. The tist stone was laid in 1752 and continued throughout the reign of Ferdinand IV, Charles's successor, until Vanvitelli's death in 1773.

The Bosco di San Silvestro (Wood of St Sylvester), on the two neighbouring hills of Montemaiuolo and Montebriano, was covered with vineyards and orchards when in 1773 Ferdinand IV decided to enclose it, together with some adjacent land, and create a hunting park. The building there served as a hunting lodge on the upper floor, the lower being used for agricultural purposes.

The hill of San Leucio takes its name from the Lombard church at its top. A hunting lodge, known as the Belvedere, had been built at its foot in the 16th century by the Acquaviva family, Princes of Caserta. The fief had been purchased by Charles Ill, and in 1773 Ferdinand IV initiated work on the socalled Old Hunting Lodge, to be abandoned after the death of his son. Between 1776 and 1778 the Belvedere was restored, the main hall being converted to a church.

In 1778 the King decided to begin the production of silk. His architect, Collecini, converted the building for this purpose, as the centre of a large industrial complex, including a school, accommodation for teachers, silkworm rooms, and facilities for spinning and dyeing the silk. He issued a series of laws in 1789 to regulate the San Leucio Royal Colony: this laid down piecework rates of pay, abolished dowries, and prescribed similar clothing for all the workers, in what has been described as a form of protosocialism. During the decade that followed, plans were made for enlargement of the village, and Collecini produced designs for a town, to be known as "Ferdinandopolis," but this dream was not realized because of the French occupation.

The fishponds in the gardens of the Royal Palace, the Royal silk factory, and the planned new town all required large amounts of water, and so the Carolino Aqueduct was built (completed in 1769) to bring water from the Fizo spring over a distance of 38km to the top of Montebriano. The final stretch runs through the Tifatini hills, where the medieval village of Casertavecchia, with its Romanesque cathedral, forms part of the panorama visible from the Royal estate.

In 1744 Charles III acquired the rich Carditello estate. The hunting lodge there was built in 1784, as part of a complex of rural houses and roads radiating fmwise from the main building. This had the Royal apartments in the centre and rooms for agricultural and stock-rearing activities on either side. The courtyard in front, which has the shape of a Roman circus, was used for racing horses and decorated with fontaim and obelisks. In the 19th century Ferdinand II expanded the agricultural activities.

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation