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Late Baroque Towns of the Val di Noto (South-Eastern Sicily)

Late Baroque Towns of the Val di Noto (South-Eastern Sicily)

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily: Caltagirone, Militello Val di Catania, Catania, Modica, Noto, Palazzolo, Ragusa and Scicli, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building.

Villes du baroque tardif de la vallée de Noto (sud-est de la Sicile)

Les huit villes du sud-est de la Sicile -- Caltagirone, Militello Val di Catania, Catane, Modica, Noto, Palazzolo, Raguse et Scicli -- ont toutes été reconstruites après 1693, sur le site ou à côté des villes qui s'y dressaient avant le tremblement de terre de cette même année. Elles représentent une initiative collective considérable, menée à terme à un haut niveau architectural et artistique. Globalement conforme au style baroque tardif de l'époque, elles représentent des innovations marquantes dans le domaine de l'urbanisme et de la construction urbaine.

مدن الفن الباروكيّ المتأخر في وادي نوتو

أعيد بناء مدن جنوب شرق صقلية الثماني كلها – كالتاجيروني، وميليتيلّو فال دي كاتانيا ، وكاتاني، وموديكا، ونوتو، وبالاتزولو، وراغوزي وشيكلي - بعد العام 1693، على الموقع أو إلى جانب المدن الأصلية التي كانت قائمة قبل الهزة الأرضية التي وقعت في تلك السنة. وهي تشكل مبادرة جماعية هائلة، تمّت بمستوى معماري وفنّي عالٍ. وتمثل أيضًا باستجابتها بصورة عامة إلى الأسلوب الباروكيّ في تلك الحقبة، عمليات إبداع مذهلة في ميدان التنظيم المُدني والبناء الحضري.

source: UNESCO/ERI

晚期的巴洛克城镇瓦拉迪那托(西西里东南部)

维琴查城于公元前2世纪修建在意大利北部,在威尼斯人的统治下,维琴查于15世纪早期到18世纪末达到全盛时期。意大利建筑师安德烈亚·帕拉第奥(1508-1580年)对古罗马建筑进行了详细研究,赋予了这座城市独特的风貌。帕拉第奥的市区建筑,以及散布在威尼托区的别墅,对意大利的建筑发展产生了决定性影响。帕拉第奥的建筑作品形成了一个与众不同的建筑风格,就是人们熟知的帕拉迪恩风格,这种建筑风格也传播到了英国、其他欧洲国家和北美。

source: UNESCO/ERI

Города позднего барокко в районе Валь-ди-Ното, юго-восток острова Сицилия

Восемь городов на юго-востоке Сицилии – Кальтаджироне, Милителло-Валь-ди-Катания, Катания, Модика, Ното, Палаццоло, Рагуза и Шикли – были восстановлены после землетрясения 1693 г. на своих прежних местах или поблизости. То был масштабный комплекс совместно выполняемых мероприятий, успешно реализованный на высоком архитектурно-художественном уровне. Выдержанные в стиле позднего барокко, эти города продемонстрировали новаторские для того времени методы планировки и застройки.

source: UNESCO/ERI

Ciudades del barroco tardío del Valle de Noto (sudeste de Sicilia)

Este sitio está formado por ocho ciudades del sudeste de Sicilia –Caltagirone, Militello, Val Di Catania, Catania, Modica, Noto, Palazzolo, Ragusa y Scicli– que fueron reconstruidas in situ, o en sus proximidades, después del terremoto que las destruyó en 1693. Fruto de una iniciativa colectiva de gran envergadura, su reconstrucción se caracterizó por el alto nivel de las obras arquitectónicas y artísticas realizadas. Edificadas en el estilo barroco tardío imperante de la época, estas ciudades son un ejemplo sumamente ilustrativo de toda una serie de innovaciones notables en materia de urbanismo y técnicas de construcción.

source: UNESCO/ERI

ヴァル・ディ・ノートの後期バロック様式の町々(シチリア島南東部)

source: NFUAJ

Laat-barokke steden van Val di Noto (Zuidoost-Sicilië)

Caltagirone, Militello Val di Catania, Catania, Modica, Noto, Palazzolo, Ragusa en Scicli zijn de acht steden in het zuidoosten van Sicilië die na 1693 stuk voor stuk werden herbouwd op of naast bestaande steden ten gevolge van de aardbeving die plaatsvond in dat jaar. Ze vertegenwoordigen een aanzienlijke collectieve onderneming, met succes uitgevoerd op een hoog architectonische en artistiek nivau. De stedengroep vertegenwoordigt het hoogtepunt en de laatste bloei van de barokke kunst in Europa. De steden verbeelden daarnaast onderscheidende innovaties op gebied van ruimtelijke ordening en stedenbouw, met inachtneming van de late-barokstijl van toen.

Source: unesco.nl

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© UNESCO
Justification for Inscription

Criterion (i): This group of towns in south-eastern Sicily provides outstanding testimony to the exuberant genius of late Baroque art and architecture.

Criterion (ii): The towns of the Val di Noto represent the culmination and final flowering of Baroque art in Europe.

Criterion (iv): The exceptional quality of the late Baroque art and architecture in the Val di Noto lies in its geographical and chronological homogeneity, as well as its quantity, the result of the 1693 earthquake in this region.

Criterion (v): The eight towns of south-eastern Sicily that make up this nomination, which are characteristic of the settlement pattern and urban form of this region, are permanently at risk from earthquakes and eruptions of Mount Etna.

Long Description

This group of towns in south-eastern Sicily represents the culmination and final flowering of Baroque art in Europe. The exceptional quality of the late Baroque art and architecture in the Val di Noto lies in its geographical and chronological homogeneity, as well as its quantity, the result of the 1693 earthquake in this region. The towns were all in existence in medieval times, characteristically around a castle and with monastic foundations. Most seem to have been changing during the 16th and 17th centuries and then been affected differentially by the 1693 earthquake.

Caltagirone is significant for its multifaceted town planning and architectural facades, and for its unusual link between the pre- and post-1693 periods. Its rich architecture exists inside an urban context resulting from the configuration of the site. The most important buildings include the churches of Santa Maria del Monte, St James the Apostle, St Joseph, St Dominic, the Holy Saviour, St Chiara and St Rita, Jesus, St Stephen, and St Francis of Assisi and, among secular buildings, the Corte Capitanale, Civic Museum, former Pawnshop, and San Francesco Bridge.

Militello Val di Catania is significant for its wealth of architecture from the 14th century onwards, and for the outstanding 17th-century walled pre-earthquake town plan which was in the vanguard of Sicilian feudal towns and was then faithfully followed in the late Baroque reconstruction. Principal buildings include the churches of San Nicolò and Santa Maria della Stella, the latter completed in 1741 on the site of St Anthony the Abbot and the former in the San Leonardo area.

Catania acquired a particular quality of urban design when it was rebuilt on a comprehensive, geometric unitary plan amid the rubble of the destroyed city. At its core are the outstanding Piazza del Duomo and the Via dei Crociferi, together with the nearby Badia de Sant'Agata, Collegiata, Benedictine monastery, and Palazzo Biscari.

Modica consists of two urban centres, the older perched on the rocky top of the southern Ibeli hill, the other rebuilt further downhill after the 1693 earthquake with imposing and conspicuous urban monuments such as the Cathedral of St George and the Church of St Peter.

Noto is on two levels, an upper part on the plateau and a lower, newer part on the slope below. The latter accommodates the buildings of the nobility and the religious complexes of the 18th century, the topography, town plan and architecture combining to create a spectacular 'Baroque stage set'. It includes nine religious complexes and numerous palazzi.

Palazzolo has two centres, the medieval one on which a new town was reconstructed on the old site but along a new axis, and a post-1693 'new town' developed along a crescent up to the earliest site of all, the Greek Akrai. The two churches of St Sebastian and Saints Peter and Paul were largely rebuilt after 1693, the latter the centre of the old nobility, the former marking the quarter of the new urban classes.

Ragusa, the ancient Ibla, is built over three hills separated by a deep valley. It, too, consists of two centres, one rebuilt on the old medieval layout and the other, Upper Ragusa, newly built after 1693. It contains nine major churches and seven major palazzi, all Baroque.

In Scicli the Via Francesco Mormina Penna stretches to the nearby Beneventano palace, perhaps the only one in Sicily to display fantastic decoration, in an urban setting where churches rise alongside patrician buildings of late Baroque age. Three churches (St John the Evangelist, St Michael and St Teresa) are from the 18th century.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC
Historical Description

Some of the nominated towns (Caltagirone, Mitello) were of pre-medieval origin, and all were in existence in medieval times, characteristically around a castle and with monastic foundations. Most seem to have been changing during the 16th and 17th centuries and then been affected differentially by the 1693 earthquake, which resulted in some 93,000 casualties. Catania, for example, was destroyed, as was Noto on top of Mount Alveria, whereas Mitello was partially destroyed and Ragusa seriously damaged. Reactions to the earthquake also differed, ranging from Catania's complete rebuild on the same site, through Mitello's partial abandonment and Ragusa's combination of new and old, to Noto's complete rebuild on a new site. All the towns saw considerable building activity through the 18th century, notably of churches, large public buildings, and palazzi. Another serious earthquake in 1990 affected some parts of some towns, Ragusa in particular. The nomination is almost entirely based on 18th century urban art and architecture and says nothing about urban economy or urban/rural relationships.

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation