World Heritage Centre http://whc.unesco.org?cid=305&l=en&action=list&searchDecisions=&search_session_decision=53&mode=rss World Heritage Centre - Committee Decisions 90 en Copyright 2019 UNESCO, World Heritage Centre Sat, 21 Sep 2019 18:15:56 EST UNESCO, World Heritage Centre - Decisions http://whc.unesco.org/document/logowhc.jpg http://whc.unesco.org 17 BUR VIII.2 Srebarna Biosphere Reserve (Bulgaria) The Bureau recalled that the Committee at its last session included this site in the List of World Heritage in Danger. Prevention of seasonal flooding has led to a decrease in the size and productivity of Srebarna and agricultural and residential use of surrounding areas have led to decline or disappearance of migratory and passerine bird populations. The Bureau recalled that IUCN, on the basis of two missions to the site in 1992, had concluded that Srebarna's World Heritage status may no longer be justified because it has deteriorated to a state where it may have irretrievably lost the characteristics which merited its inclusion in the World Heritage List.

The Bureau at its sixteenth session, held in Paris in July 1992, had recommended that the Committee consider deleting this property from the World Heritage List and had invited the Bulgarian authorities to submit their observations and comments to the Committee. At its last session, the Committee was informed by the Representative of Bulgaria that the Bulgarian Government, in order to restore the World Heritage values of Srebarna, was preparing a comprehensive assessment of the state of conservation of Srebarna and an ecosystem restoration plan. The Committee had indicated to the Bulgarian authorities that available scientific evidence suggested that the site may no longer possess the natural habitat values for which it was inscribed, and that a full restoration of a naturally functioning ecosystem might be impossible. However, the Committee invited the Bulgarian authorities to submit, before 1 May 1993, to the World Heritage Centre, the results of the on-going project to prepare a comprehensive assessment of the state of conservation of the site, including an analysis of available data to monitor biological populations and environmental quality, and a plan for ecosystem restoration.

The Bureau noted that the Bulgarian authorities have submitted to the World Heritage Centre, a project document entitled 'Environmental Recovery and Restoration of the Biosphere Reserve "Srebarna"'and had indicated that a report on the comprehensive assessment of the state of conservation of Srebarna will be sent to the Centre as soon as its translation into French is finalized. A representative of IUCN made a detailed presentation on the state of conservation of Srebarna and the Bulgarian plan for its restoration, and emphasized the fact that most small wetlands like Srebarna (600 ha) are inherently unstable and their ecological integrity is easily threatened by changes occurring outside their boundaries. The Bureau noted that the restoration plans currently being implemented by the Bulgarian authorites could restore the hydraulic regime of Srebarna, and hence have the potential to restore the ecosystem which existed at the time of Srebarna's inscription on the World Heritage List. Furthermore, the Bureau learnt that the Bulgarian authorities were introducing a system to issue permits to local people for hunting wild boar and foxes which threaten the population of Dalmatior- Pelicans in Srebarna. The Bureau, however, noted that the Peli_in population of Srebarna comprised only about 10% of the global population of the species, and continued to breed in sites outside of Srebarna, including some sites in Romania, where they were hunted.

The Bureau recommended to the Committee to: (a) retain Srebarna on the List of World Heritage in Danger; (b) defer its decision on whether or not to delete Srebarna from the World Heritage List for a period of two years and (c) request IUCN, in co-operation with the Ramsar Convention, to monitor the extent to which the project(s) implemented by the Bulgarian authorities are restoring the ecological integrity of Srebarna. Furthermore, the Bureau requested that the proposal for the restoration of Srebarna, and the comprehensive assessment of its state of conservation be made available to members of the Committee for review, and that the Bulgarian and Romanian authorities co-operate in protecting the populations of Dalmation Pelicans in the region. The Bureau requested IUCN and the Centre to co-operate with the Ramsar Convention and the Bulgarian authorities and report to its eighteenth session on the extent to which the restoration efforts implemented by the Bulgarian authorities are helping to restore Srebarna.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5388 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Plitvice Lakes National Park (Croatia) The Bureau recalled that the integrity of this site, which has been inaccessible since the onset of armed conflict in the region in 1991, still remained intact. However, recognizing that the potential for a resurgence of hostilities continued to threaten the integrity of this site, the Committee, at its last session included the Plitvice Lakes National Park in the List of World Heritage in Danger and called upon the Government of Croatia, UNPROFOR and the authorities in the Krajina Region to co-operate to implement the Vance Plan and its successor resolutions to stabilize the political situation in the region. The Bureau learnt that as recommended by the Committee, at its sixteenth session, UNPROFOR undertakes regular surveillance patrols in the Park area, and is trying to bring together authorities from the Croatian Government and the Krajina Region to discuss the organization of a second international mission to the site. The Bureau requested the Centre to continue its dialogue with UNPROFOR to explore the possibilities for organizing such an international mission and report on the outcome to the seventeenth session of the Committee.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5389 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Mt. Nimba Nature Reserve (Côte d'Ivoire/Guinea) In 1981 the World Heritage Committee inscribed Mt. Nimba on the World Heritage List. In 1992 Mt Nimba was placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger by the Committee which requested the Centre to send an expert mission to: (a) ascertain the boundaries of the site at the time of inscription and recommend an appropriate boundary; (b) assess the impact of the iron-ore mine and other threats to the integrity of the site; (c) work towards an integrated rural development project.

The mission was carried out between 15 to 30 May 1993. It included representatives from the Centre, UNDP, UNEP, the Government of Guinea, NIMCO (the mining company), IUCN, CEDI (an international NGO in France), Guinea Ecology (local NGO) and two consultants as well as local specialists.

A comprehensive review of the part of Mt. Nimba situated in Guinea was carried out with extensive site and village visits and reviews of specific issues such as: the original nomination, the mineral body, the boundaries, and the socio-economic situation relating to local communities.

The major findings were as follows:

i) the site met World Heritage criteria at the time of the original nomination in 1981. It continues to meet these criteria;

ii) the site should remain on the List of World Heritage in Danger primarily because of the high risk of agricultural intrustions due to the lack of an established administrative structure and effective protection. At the present time, the Mt. Nimba Pilot Project provides a management presence, but this is not assured; Guinea was fully aware of the mineral potential. Over $25 million had been spent on prospecting and a potential ore body of 500 million tonnes had been identified. As the Government has stated, it was not their intention to include the mineral body in the World Heritage nomination. It is recommended that this perspective be accepted;

iv) the revised nomination submitted in 1991 should be considered as withdrawn, as it was not accepted by the Committee;

v) a revised nomination has been requested. It will include a revised area of 17,740 ha. which is 610 ha larger than the 1981 nomination of 17,130 ha. It is, however, 1,550 ha less than the true size of the 1981 nomination which was 19,290 ha, including the Côte d'Ivoire section of 5,200 ha. The area required for mineral operations (1,500 ha.) is not included in the World Heritage nomination;

vi) there are 18 recommendations in the mission report which is available from the World Heritage Centre. The recommendations include a commitment by the Government and the mining company to an "Environmental Convention" in which NGOs will be invited to participate. In addition, the mining company agrees, once the mine becomes operational, to contribute $500,000 per year towards conservation projects;

vii) until the war and the political situation in Liberia stabilises, it is unlikely that the mine will become operational;

viii) continued surveillance through a management presence is essential for the conservation of the site - primarily to prevent agricultural incursions into the World Heritage site.

The integrity of this site will require technical and financial support from the Committee until an adequate on-site management regime is established. It is recommended that $30,000 in emergency funds be provided for the express purpose of maintaining a management presence on the site.

The Bureau accepted the findings of the Task Force and concurred with the revised boundaries and the retention of the site on the List of World Heritage in Danger.

The Observer of Guinea expressed thanks for having organized this mission and the Bureau emphasized that it accepted the new boundaries and would pursue with vigour the implementation of the eighteen recommedations in the report. The Observer added that he welcomed the recommendation of Germany and the United States of America regarding the participation of the Centre in future environmental studies. The Government of Guinea submitted a request for $30,000 in emergency assistance to implement the recommendations.

Bureau members underlined their long-term concern for the protection of the site, which would undoubtedly receive some impact if the potential mine adjacent to the site became operational. The Government of Guinea agreed to take all measures to ensure that any impact of the mining operations would be subject to detailed environmental assessment and all measures would be taken to minimize potential damage.

IUCN again underlined its concern that potential repercussions of the mine in 30 to 40 years could become a future problem for the Committee. The Bureau was in agreement with the findings of the mission and was pleased that the mission was able to respond to the questions placed before them and to clarify the current status of the site.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5390 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Sangay National Park (Ecuador) Noting that the Ecuadorean authorities have not yet provided the information requested by the Committee, the Bureau requested the Centre to contact them once again and obtain information on the status of the road construction project and on-going efforts to assess its impact on the integrity of the site. In accordance with the recommendations of the Committee, the Bureau also invited the Ecuadorean authorities to consider (a) submitting a proposal to extend this World Heritage site to include new areas that have been added to the Park, and (b) inviting a mission comprising regional experts to assess the severity of the threats faced by this site and plan remedial action. The Bureau requested the Centre to report on the implementation of the Committee's recommendation to the seventeenth session of the Committee, scheduled to be convened during December 1993.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5391 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Manas Wildlife Sanctuary (India) The Bureau recalled that the Committee, at its last session, was informed that the damage caused by the invasion of this site by militants belonging to the Bodo tribe in Assam was estimated to be about US$1.6 million and that although the Park infrastructure had suffered considerable damage, habitats in the inaccessible parts of the Sanctuary appeared to be intact. Concerned by the information reported by the Representative of IUCN that the area is still not completely free from encroachments by militants belonging to the Bodo tribe, and that illegal cultivation was spreading into parts of the Sanctuary, the Committee at its last session, in accordance with Article 11, paragraph (4), of the Convention, included the Manas Wildlife Sanctuary in the List of World Heritage in Danger. The Bureau was informed that the Centre had drawn the attention of the Indian authorities to the fact that they have not yet provided a formal written report on the state of conservation of Manas, despite repeated requests from the Committee since 1989, and had reiterated the Committee's request for a comprehensive report providing a full assessment of the damage to the site and remedial measures that are being taken. Noting that the Indian authorities have not yet provided the report requested by the Committee, the Bureau asked the Centre to continue its efforts to obtain such a report for submission to the seventeenth session of the Committee.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5392 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Air and Ténéré Nature Reserve (Niger) The Bureau recalled that the Committee, at its last session, included this site in the List of World Heritage in Danger because it was concerned that the region in which it is situated has been affected by civil disturbance and that six members of the Reserve staff were being held hostage since February 1992. The Bureau deeply regretted that two of the six Reserve staff who had been held hostage died during their captivity and the health of the other four who were released in April 1993 was found to be poor. The Bureau instructed the Centre to transmit the Committee's condolences to the families of Messrs Mamadou Cheffou and Alassoum Oumarou who died whilst being held captive. Furthermore, the Bureau also expressed the wish that the four members of the Reserve staff who were released in April 1993 would soon regain their health. The Bureau noted that the Government of Niger has initiated informal negotiations with armed opposition and encouraged the authorities to continue the dialogue with a view to finding an early solution to the conflict in the region.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5393 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Iguazu National Park (Argentina) The Bureau recalled that the Committee, at its fifteenth session held in Carthage, Tunisia, in December 1991, noted that eight helicopters regularly overflew the waterfall area and that local conservation groups opposed the use of the area by helicopters since it contravened legal regulations for air traffic control over protected areas. The Bureau was satisfied to note that the efforts of the Argentine National Park Administration and the Air Force, to establish an agreement to regulate the use of air space over the Iguazu National Park by helicopters is proceeding. The Bureau urged the Argentine authorities to expedite its finalization and until such time to enforce existing air space regulations in that area.

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17 BUR VIII.2 Iaguaçu National Park (Brasil) The Bureau was satisfied to note that the Brazilian authorities were in contact with their counterparts in Argentina to study the possibilities for establishing common regulations for helicopter traffic over the waterfalls area.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5395 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Wrangell-St. Elias-Kluane-Glacier Bay National Parks (Canada/United States of America) The Bureau recalled that the Committee, while approving the extension of this transfrontier site to include the Glacier Bay National Park (USA), at its last session, urged the American and the Canadian authorities to incorporate additional areas to the World Heritage property.

In this regard, the Bureau was pleased to be informed ty the Observer for Canada that the Provincial Government of British Columbia has decided to propose to the World Heritage Centre to establish a new provincial park in the Alsek Tatshenshint region and nominate this park as part of the transfrontier world Heritage property. The Bureau commended the Canadian authorities for having taken this initiative and urged them to proceed according to the Operational Guidelines.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5396 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Manovo-Gounda Saint Fions (Central African Republic) In response to the December 1992 request of the World Heritage Committee, two meetings were held with representatives of the Central African Republic (CAR) to discuss: (a) the protection of the site; (b) participation of local people, and (c) the social-economic ramifications of a "privatized management regime". The first meeting in April determined that the issues were of an administrative and legal nature rather than ecological and thus it was decided not to carry out a field mission.

On 10 May 1993 legal representatives of the Central African Republic, UNESCO and IUCN met at the World Heritage Centre to review the above-mentioned items (a), (b) and (c).

The following major findings were noted:

(i) the site and the surrounding region are currently socially, politically and economically unstable. Poaching from neighbouring countries is serious and presents high risks to anyone trying to prevent it;

(ii) the Government of the Central African Republic does not have the financial or staff resources to effectively manage the World Heritage site. It is interested in some form of privatization, leasing or franchising. This could involve an advisory body with representation from international organizations as well as local people. The body should have a fund-raising and management capability;

(iii) there is not a consensus on whether privatization would be appropriate. Technically and legally it is feasible, but further clarification of the proposal is required and has been requested.

The Central African Republic was recommended to continue to explore alternative management approaches and the Centre should co-operate in seeking an effective management solution. The Bureau agreed to the above recommendation and the Centre will report to the Committee when new information becomes available. The Bureau requested the Centre to ensure that the State Party respected all obligations incurred by joining the Convention and ensure the long-term conservation of the site.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5397 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Talamanca-La Amistad National Park (Costa Rica-Panama) The Bureau took note of the fact that the proposal to construct a road through of the Talamanca-La Amistad Reserves of Costa Rica is unlikely to be implemented in the immediate future. The Bureau was informed that the Costa Rican authorities were not in agreement with all the boundary modifications recommended by the Committee, at its fifteenth session. The Bureau noted that the Ministry of Natural Resources, Energy and Mines, which is responsible for the management of the Talamanca-La Amistad Reserves, and the general public, as well as the indigenous people resident within the site, were not in favour of all proposed modifications of the boundary suggested by the Committee. The Bureau noted the interest of the Costa Rican authorities to receive technical advice on measures to improve living conditions of people resident in Indian Reserves within the Talamanca-La Amistad Reserves. A representative of IUCN informed the Bureau that specialists from IUCN's Regional Office in Costa Rica are discussing the boundary modifications proposed by the Committee with the Costa Rican authorities. These discussions have taken into consideration the need to accommodate the socio-economic aspirations of indigenous people in the Biosphere Reserve whilst protecting the World Heritage values of the site. The Bureau requested the World Heritage Centre to continue dialogue with the Costa Rican authorities in this important matter and report on the outcome during the forthcoming session of the Committee in December 1993.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5398 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Tikal National Park (Guatemala) The Bureau noted with satisfaction that the size of this mixed World Heritage property might be enlarged by about 50% and that the new areas earmarked for inclusion in the Park may contain natural and cultural heritage values of universal significance. The Bureau was informed that an IUCN project in the buffer zone of the Park is working with 26 villages to find alternative livelihood strategies which will minimize the dependence of the indigenous people on resources within the World Heritage site.

The Bureau commended the efforts of the Government of Denmark which is supporting this project with a contribution of US$ 520,000 over a two-year period. The Bureau requested the Centre to contact the competent authorities in Guatemala and encourage them to extend the boundaries of thi!: mixed World Heritage property. Full use should be made t the above-mentioned project.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5399 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Te Wahinounamu - Southwest New Zealand (New Zealand) The Bureau recalled that at its last session the Committee was informed that the Government of New Zealand had approved an application from a private company for a licence to export water from this World Heritage site. The exportation of freshwater would require the construction of a dam, a buried pipeline and four large reservoirs at Jackson's Bay. The Committee noted that the visual and ecological impacts of the proposed development project were not clearly known and that the legal and economic considerations which guided the decision to approve the project were being actively debated in New Zealand.

The Bureau noted with satisfaction that the Minister of Conservation has subsequently indicated to the private company (Okuru Enterprises Ltd.) that he would not approve locating the pipeline inside the Mt. Aspiring National Park located within this World Heritage site. Authorities of the Okuru Enterprises Ltd. are now modifying their application to obtain water from a creek situated outside the boundaries of the National Park. The changes which the Okuru Enterprises Ltd. will introduce to the original proposal will be advertized for public comment and have to be agreed upon on a consensual basis. Following this procedure, a new report on the modified proposal will be submitted to the Minister of Conservation so that all relevant information could be re-assessed. The Bureau concurred with the New Zealand authorities that it will be some time before a final decision at Ministerial level is taken on the acceptability of the modified proposal. The Bureau noted that the New Zealand authorities have assured the Centre that the environmental impact of the modified proposal will be carefully considered and that decisions will not be made in haste, and that the maintenance of the values of the World Heritage area will be an important consideration in reviewing any project for water export. The Bureau requested the Centre and IUCN to remain regularly updated on the the review of the water-export proposal to be carried out by New Zealand's Department of Conservation.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5400 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Danube Delta (Romania) The Bureau recalled that the Committee, at its last session, drew the attention of the Romanian authorities to the fact that they were yet to complete the final steps to establish a legislative framework for this site, despite the assurances of the Representative of Romania to the fifteenth session of the Committee in December 1991, when the Delta Danube was inscribed on the World Heritage List. The Bureau was informed that the Ministry.of Waters, Forests and Environmental Protection of Romania has prepared the draft of the law concerning the establishment of the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve and included it as part of the working agenda of the Parliament and that this draft will be considered soon.

The Bureau noted that the Danube Delta World Heritage site will benefit from the Danube River Basin Environment Programme which will be financed by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and implemented with technical advice from IUCN.

The Representative of Romania informed the Bureau that new research institution for the Danube Delta has been established and will undertake studies relevant to the conservation of the Danube Delta. The Bureau requested the Romanian authorities to inform the Centre when the Parliament has approved the draft law and encouraged them to co-operate with the Centre to prepare a technical assistance project for the conservation of the Danube Delta. IUCN and other non-governmental organizations should be involved to the extent possible.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5401 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Niokolo-Roba National Park (Senegal) The Bureau recalled that at its last session in July 1992 it had requested IUCN to provide a report on the progress in the implementation of measures to mitigate environmental impacts of a road construction protect in this Park. The Representative of IUCN informed the Bureau that the University of Dakar, Senegal, had undertaken an independent assessment of the implementation of mitigation measures and that the findings of this study had been validated by the Regional Representative of IUCN for West Africa. The Bureau was pleased to note that the study had found the implementation of mitigation measures to be satisfactory and the impacts on the Park to be minimal. However, the Bureau noted that the implementation of the road construction project had caused a number of concerns, particularly the wider impacts due to the presence of a new transportation corridor traversing the region, which were not originally foreseen. The Bureau commended the Senegalese National Park authorities who had co-operated with IUCN to prepare a "white paper" addressing these unforeseen consequences and the long-term future of the Park, and elaborated three strategies which would become part of a major project for ensuring the long­term future of the Park. The Committee noted that these strategies will be discussed during a donors' meeting, co­sponsored by the Senegalese National Park authorities and IUCN's Regional Office for West Africa and scheduled for 28 June 1993, and requested that the outcome of the donors' meeting be made available to the Centre for submission to the next session of the Committee. The Bureau requested the Centre to make copies of the "white paper" available for any interested States Party.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5402 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Ngorongoro Conservation Area (Tanzania) The Bureau recalled that this site was removed from the List of World Heritage in Danger in 1988, and was deeply concerned to learn that the Prime Minister of Tanzania had announced that the residents of the area will be allowed to grow crops inside this World Heritage site, in contradiction to the Ngorongoro Conservation Area Law. The Representative of IUCN noted that although allowing small areas of maize cultivation may help to ease conflicts between local people and site-staff, the announcement appears to have encouraged people to clear vegetation over extensive areas, including many slopes unsuitable for agriculture, resulting in a nearly uninterrupted belt of cultivation on the slopes of the Ngorongoro Crater, from Endulen to north of Empakai. The Bureau requested IUCN to report on the findings of a survey that is currently underway to assess the impact of the newly cultivated areas to the Committee at its next session. The Bureau recommended that the Committee, at its seventeenth session in December 1993, include once again, the Ngorongoro Conservation Area in the List of World Heritage in Danger and requested the Centre to communicate its concerns to the Minister of Tourism, Natural Resources and Environment of Tanzania.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5403 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Everglades National Park (United States of America) The Bureau recalled that the Committee, at its last session, was informed of the damage caused by Hurricane Andrew which affected extensive areas of this World Heritage site on 24 August 1992. The Bureau noted that the damage caused by Hurricane Andrew has had a wide range of impacts on the ecology of Everglades and that the site has been entered on the "Montreux Record", the equivalent of a 'danger list' under the Ramsar Convention. The Representative of IUCN informed the Bureau that conservation problems of the Everglades have been covered extensively in the literature and that a monitoring report on Everglades submitted at the Ramsar Conference in Japan, from 9 to 16 June 1993, could be treated as the starting point for preparing a state of conservation report on Everglades for the forthcoming session of the Committee. The Bureau recognized that due to the number of agencies at various levels of government which are concerned with the conservation of Everglades, a state of conservation report on this World Heritage site may consider its inclusion in the List of World Heritage in Danger as one of its recommendations. The Bureau requested IUCN to prepare a state of conservation report on Everglades for submission to the seventeenth session of the Committee and noted that a supplementary allocation to lower costs was requested by IUCN. The Delegate of the United States of America supported the preparation of such a report, since it would bring an international and global dimension to the conservation of Everglades and assured his Government's assistance for the preparation of the report.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5404 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Virunga National Park (Zaire) The Bureau was deeply concerned to learn that due to recent political uncertainties in the country all donors, except WWF, have withdrawn their support to this Park. This has resulted in destruction of vegetation, poaching, agricultural encroachment and over-exploitation of fish populations in Lake Idi Amin. Since November 1992, the Park staff has not received salaries, and funds for operations and maintenance are not available. Several new settlements have appeared in the Park, particularly around Lake Idi Amin, and some gold mining and livestock grazing have also been reported.

The Bureau was informed that an IUCN/WWF field visit to this World Heritage site is being considered for October 1993 to assess current damage and suggest long-term options for the conservation of the site. The Bureau recommended that the Committee include the Virunga National Park in the List of World Heritage in Danger, unless the proposed IUCN/WWF site visit to in October 1993 provides sufficient evidence to the contrary. The Bureau agreed, in principle, to provide emergency assistance of US$ 20,000 for Virunga National Park which does not constitute a precedent, and subject to the receipt of a formal and acceptable request from the competent national authorities responsible for the management of this property.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5405 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Durmitor National Park (Montenegro) The Bureau recalled that the Committee, at its last session, noted that the authorities responsible for the management of this site are of the view that the proposed construction of a hydroelectric dam on the Tara River and the pollution of the River by an asphalt dam situated upstream had minimal impacts on the conservation of Durmitor National Park. The Bureau acknowledged the fact that the Montenegro authorities had invited a UNESCO/IUCN mission to the site and that this mission should be undertaken as early as possible in order to ensure the conservation of this World Heritage site. However, the Bureau noted that given the current situation of conflicts within the former territory of Yugoslavia, and UNESCO's obligation to conform to Resolution 757 of the UN Security Council, the UNESCO World Heritage Centre was unable to proceed with the organization of the UNESCO/IUCN mission to Durmitor National Park. The Bureau therefore expressed the hope that the situation will change soon and the World Heritage Centre can proceed to organize this mission.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/5406 wh-info@unesco.org Mon, 21 Jun 1993 00:00:00 EST
17 BUR VIII.2 Angkor (Cambodia) The Committee, at its sixteenth session, inscribed the Angkor site, together with its monuments and archaeological zones, as described in the "Perimeter de Protection" accompanying the ICOMOS report, on the World Heritage List. The Committee, however, noted that Cambodia had been placed under the temporary administration of the United Nations, in accordance with the Paris Accords, since July 1991. In order to deal quickly and effectively with the urgent problems of conservation facing this site, the Committee decided to include Angkor in the List of World Heritage in Danger and requested that the competent UN and Cambodian authorities take the necessary steps to meet the following conditions:

i) enact adequate protective legislation;

ii) establish an adequately staffed national protection agency;

iii) establish permanent boundaries based on the UNDP project;

iv) define meaningful buffer zones, and

v) establish monitoring and co-ordination of the international conservation effort.

At its present session, the Bureau was briefed by the UNESCO Representative to Cambodia, on the state of implementation of the Committee recommendation since its last session. A comprehensive legislation, "Decision on the Protection of the National Cultural Heritage", was adopted by the Supreme National Council at its meeting of 10 February 1993 and took immediate effect.

The future challenge will be to ensure that the provisions of this law be enabled by the constitution, which is currently being drafted by the newly-elected constituent assembly.

A supra-ministerial agency, "The National Heritage Protection Authority of Cambodia" (NHPAC), headed by HRH Prince Norodom Sihanouk, was formally established on 10 February 1993 by a decision of the Supreme Council of Cambodia.

The governing body of the agency has been nominated and the line-functions will be filled in the near future. It is estimated that they will be functional by September 1993.

UNESCO has executed, with funds from UNDP and Sweden and with technical assistance from the United States National Park Service, the Angkor Foundation of Hungary, The Thailand Department of Fine Arts, The Ecole Française d'Extreme Orient, and the World Conservation Union (IUCN), a "Zoning and Environment Management Plan" (ZEMP) for the Angkor Area. As a result of the analyzed data, it was possible to define an "Angkor Cultural Area" corresponding to the catchment area of the ancient Khmer capital. Within this area two large "protected" or "restricted" areas have been identified. One, tentatively called the "Angkor Archaeological Park", is concentrated on the core monumental area. The other, the "Phnom Kulen Park", comprises the environmentally important Kulen Mountain together with more than 100 important monuments from the earliest period of the Empire. In addition, within the Angkor Cultural Area, smaller satellite parks have been defined around the monumental complex of Banteay Srei and Phnom Krom. Also defined are more than 500 "Special Areas of Archaeological Concern" (SAAC), many of which have been newly discovered by the ZEMP project, ESZs ("Ecologically Sensitive Zones"), UCZs ("Urban Conservation Zones"), and urban development zones.

In addition to defining protected/restricted areas and surrounding buffer zones, the ZEMP project has developed zoning regulations and management guidelines, not only for the World Heritage site, but also for the larger surrounding area wherein development activities may have adverse effects on conservation of the Angkor site itself.

The recommendations and policy options of the ZEMP study have already been endorsed at the technical level by the Cambodian authorities and are currently under discussion at the political level. Formal adoption of the ZEMP recommendations may not be possible before the formation of a new national government, foreseen for September or October 1993.

A monitoring/co-ordinating unit for the international conservation effort was established by UNESCO's Director-General within the Physical Heritage Division. A consultative meeting of international experts on Angkor was convened last April in Siem Reap. The Bureau expressed full satisfaction of the work undertaken in such limited time and in the present critical political situation.

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