World Heritage Centre http://whc.unesco.org?cid=305&l=en&action=list&searchDecisions=&search_session_decision=110&maxrows=200&year_start=2016&year_end=2016&mode=rss World Heritage Centre - Committee Decisions 90 en Copyright 2019 UNESCO, World Heritage Centre Thu, 19 Sep 2019 23:53:11 EST UNESCO, World Heritage Centre - Decisions http://whc.unesco.org/document/logowhc.jpg http://whc.unesco.org 40 COM 2 Admission of Observers The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Taking into consideration Rule 8 (Observers) of the Rules of Procedure of the Committee,
  2. Authorizes the participation in the 40th session as observers of those representatives of the international governmental organizations (IGOs), international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), non- governmental organizations (NGOs), permanent observer missions to UNESCO and non profit-making institutions having activities in the fields covered by the Convention, who have requested observer participation at the session and as listed in Section A of document WHC-16/40.COM/2,
  3. Further confirms the participation in the 40th session as observers of all those invited by the Director-General of UNESCO in accordance with Rule 8.4 of the Rules of Procedure of the Committee and as listed in Section B of document WHC-16/40.COM/2.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6770 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 3A Adoption of the Agenda The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/3A.Rev.2,
  2. Adopts the Agenda contained in the above-mentioned document.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6771 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 3B Adoption of the Timetable The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/3B.Rev.2,
  2. Adopts the Timetable contained in the above-mentioned document
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6772 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 4 Report of the Rapporteur of the 39th session of the World Heritage Committee (Bonn, 2015) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Takes note of the report of the Rapporteur of the 39th session of the World Heritage Committee (Bonn, 2015).
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6773 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 5A Report of the World Heritage Centre on its Activities and the Implementation of the World Heritage Committee’s Decisions The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/5A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 5A adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Takes note with appreciation of the activities undertaken by the World Heritage Centre over the past year in pursuit of the Expected Result to ensure that “tangible heritage is identified, protected, monitored and sustainably managed by Member States, in particular through the effective implementation of the 1972 Convention”, and the five strategic objectives as presented in Document WHC/16/40.COM/5A;
  4. Requests the World Heritage Centre to inform the Committee of relevant expert meetings and their results in a timely manner;
  5. Also requests the World Heritage Centre, in cooperation with the Advisory Bodies, to develop interactive orientation sessions for new Committee members;
  6. Welcomes the synergies among the Culture Conventions in the framework of the Culture Conventions Liaison Group (CCLG) and the first meeting of the Chairpersons of all six UNESCO Culture Conventions;
  7. Also welcomes the enhanced cooperation and synergies with the biodiversity-related conventions and programmes and invites the World Heritage Centre to continue its engagement with the synergy processes;
  8. Invites the States Parties to support the activities carried out by the World Heritage Centre as well as give due consideration to make mandatory and voluntary contributions necessary for the sustained operations of the Centre and implementation of the Convention;
  9. Further requests the World Heritage Centre to present, at its 41st session, a report on its activities.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6774 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 5B Reports of the Advisory Bodies The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/5B,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 5B adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Takes note with appreciation of the reports of the Advisory Bodies (ICCROM, ICOMOS and IUCN) on their activities;
  4. Welcomes the harmonization of the reports by the Advisory Bodies and the comments on the progress made and gaps identified for the implementation of the Convention;
  5. Calls upon ICOMOS and IUCN to continue to engage in appropriate dialogue and consultation with States Parties to further enhance overall transparency and optimize decision-making of the Committee.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6775 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 5C World Heritage Convention and Sustainable Development The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/5C,
  2. Recalling Decisions 36 COM 5C, 38 COM 5D, and 39 COM 5D, adopted respectively at its 36th (Saint Petersburg, 2012), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions, as well as Resolution 20 GA 13, adopted by the General Assembly at its 20th session (UNESCO, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the adoption of the “Policy Document for the integration of a sustainable development perspective into the processes of the World Heritage Convention” by the 20th General Assembly of States Parties (UNESCO, 2015);
  4. Reiterates the need to achieve appropriate balance and integration between the protection of the Outstanding Universal Value of World Heritage properties and the pursuit of sustainable development objectives and invites the World Heritage Centre to develop a strategy in due time, as appropriate, for the implementation of the sustainable development policy;
  5. Takes note of the follow-up activities and the progress made by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in disseminating and mainstreaming the policy into operational activities, as requested by Decision 39 COM 5D and Resolution 20 GA 13;
  6. Also takes note of the active participation of the World Heritage Centre and Advisory Bodies in supporting Members States in the implementation of SDG 11 and Target 11.4 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and of the further work anticipated on developing indicators in this regard;
  7. Also notes contributions by the World Heritage Convention to a number of other SDG goals and also invites the World Heritage Centre, Advisory Bodies and States Parties to highlight all World Heritage related contributions in their follow-up processes and reporting on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development;
  8. Calls upon States Parties to ensure that sustainable development principles are mainstreamed into their national processes related to World Heritage and integrated at the level of local communities, in full respect of the boundaries and the Outstanding Universal Value of World Heritage properties;
  9. Recalls the Article 13.7 of the World Heritage Convention and encourages all States Parties, the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to invite the perspectives of non-governmental and civil society organizations with practical experience of conservation of World Heritage properties in the further development of principles intended to mainstream sustainable development into national, regional and other relevant policies related to World Heritage;
  10. Decides to inscribe an agenda item concerning World Heritage and Sustainable Development at its 41st session in 2017 and requests the World Heritage Centre to present a progress report in this regard.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6776 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 5D Report on the World Heritage Thematic Programmes The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/5D,
  2. Recalling Decisions 32 COM 10, 32 COM 10A, 34 COM 5F.1, 36 COM 5D, 36 COM 5E and 38 COM 5E, adopted at its 32nd (Quebec City, 2008), 34th (Brasilia, 2010), 36th (Saint Petersburg, 2012) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
  3. Welcomes the progress report on the implementation of the World Heritage Thematic Programmes and Initiatives, notes their important contribution towards implementation of the Global Strategy for representative World Heritage List, and thanks all States Parties, donors and other organizations for having contributed to achieving their objectives;
  4. Acknowledges the results attained by the Forest Programme, which has achieved its key objectives, and decides to phase it out; requesting the World Heritage Centre to continue to provide support in identifying, conservation and managing forests of Outstanding Universal Value, in view of their contribution to achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals related to forests;
  5. Also acknowledges the contribution of the World Heritage Programme on Earthen Architecture to the state of conservation and management of earthen architecture worldwide and requests the World Heritage Centre to undertake the necessary steps for entrusting the main partner of the Programme, CRATerre, with the operational implementation of the Programme and to ensure the necessary institutional overview and guidance;
  6. Further acknowledges the results achieved by the World Heritage Cities Programme and calls States Parties and other stakeholders to provide human and financial resources ensuring the continuation of this Programme in view of its crucial importance for the conservation of the urban heritage inscribed on the World Heritage List, for the implementation of the Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape and its contribution to achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals related to cities as well as for its contribution to the preparation of the New Urban Agenda;
  7. Acknowledges furthermore the results achieved of the World Heritage Marine Programme its contribution to achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals related to oceans, also thanks Flanders, the Netherlands and France for their support, notes with concern the possible departure of key donors in 2017 and invites States Parties and other stakeholders to continue to provide human and financial resources to support for the implementation of the Programme;
  8. Notes the results achieved in the implementation of the World Heritage Sustainable Tourism Programme, expresses appreciation for the funding provided by the European Commission and further thanks Flanders, Germany, Malaysia, Norway and the Netherlands for their support in the implementation of the Programme's activities;
  9. Also notes the results achieved by the HEADS Programme, thanks Ethiopia, Germany, Mexico, Republic of Korea, Spain, South Africa and Turkey for their generous support and decides to phase out the Programme, also requesting the World Heritage Centre to continue to provide relevant support in identifying, conservation and managing of human-evolution related heritage of Outstanding Universal Value;
  10. Further notes the progress in the implementation of the Small Island Developing States Programme, its importance for a representative, credible and balanced World Heritage List, thanks furthermore Japan and the Netherlands for their support and also requests the States Parties and other stakeholders to continue to provide human and financial resources for the implementation of the Programme;
  11. Notes furthermore the results achieved in the framework of the Thematic Initiative “Astronomy and World Heritage", and further requests the World Heritage Centre to undertake the necessary steps for entrusting IAU with the operational implementation of the Programme and to ensure the necessary institutional guidance;
  12. Also takes note of the progress report on the Initiative on Heritage of Religious Interest, endorses the recommendations of the first Thematic Expert Consultation meeting, also thanks Bulgaria for its generous contribution and reiterates its invitation to States Parties and other stakeholders to continue to support this Initiative;
  13. Urges States Parties, international organizations and donors to contribute financially to the Thematic Programmes and Initiatives as the implementation of thematic priorities is no longer feasible without extra-budgetary funding;
  14. Requests furthermore the World Heritage Centre to submit an updated result-based report on Thematic Programmes and Initiatives, under Item 5A: Report of the World Heritage Centre on its activities, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6777 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 6 Follow-Up to the World Heritage Capacity-Building Strategy and Progress Report on the World Heritage-Related Category 2 Centres The World Heritage Committee,
  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/6,
  2. Recalling Decisions 36 COM 6, 36 COM 9B, 37 COM 5E, 37 COM 6, 38 COM 6 as well as 39 COM 6 adopted at its 36th (St Petersburg, 2012), 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Commends the progress made in the implementation of the World Heritage Capacity-Building Strategy (WHCBS), its accompanying World Heritage Capacity-Building Programme, and the capacity-building activities carried out in 2015 and in the beginning of 2016;
  4. Notes with appreciation the continued support of the Government of Switzerland in the implementation of the World Heritage Capacity-Building Programme;
  5. Welcomes the initiative by the Government of Norway in collaboration with ICCROM and IUCN to develop a medium term, six-year programme for capacity building, “World Heritage Leadership”;
  6. Calls upon other States Parties and organizations to provide additional funding and support for the implementation of the World Heritage Capacity-Building Programme and associated activities at the international and regional levels;
  7. Takes note of the development of the regional capacity-building strategies and initiatives, and also calls upon States Parties and all concerned partners and stakeholders to follow-up on the implementation of the strategies developed for each region, ensuring that the different regional initiatives do not overlap;
  8. Also welcomes the progress made by all category 2 centres related to World Heritage in implementing their activities and calls on interested stakeholders to support these activities;
  9. Requests the World Heritage Centre and ICCROM to submit a progress report on the implementation of the World Heritage Capacity-Building Strategy and the activities of the category 2 centres related to World Heritage, with indicators on number of participants from developing and underrepresented States Parties, for examination by the Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6778 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7 State of Conservation of World Heritage Properties The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/7, WHC/16/40.COM/7A, WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add, WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add.2, WHC/16/40.COM/7B, WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add and WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add.2,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),

    Emergency situation resulting from conflicts
  3. Deplores the conflict situation prevailing in several countries, the loss of human life as well as the degradation of humanitarian conditions and expresses its utmost concern at the damage sustained and the threats facing cultural and natural heritage in general;
  4. Urges the States Parties to ratify international instruments such as the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and implores States Parties associated with conflicts to refrain from any action that would cause further damage to cultural and natural heritage and to fulfil their obligations under international law by taking all possible measures to protect such heritage, in particular the safeguarding of World Heritage properties and the sites included in the Tentative List;
  5. Also urges the States Parties to adopt measures that oppose World Heritage properties being used for military purposes;
  6. Takes note of the progress made by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to launch a reflection on a post-conflict recovery strategy, and of the support extended so far through technical assistance, capacity-building, and exchange of best practices in this regard, and recommends that further support for threatened or damaged World Heritage properties be pursued;
  7. Notes with concern that the conflict situation in several countries in the world has increased considerably the work load of the World Heritage Centre staff, and that an adequate implementation of the Action Plans for the Emergency Safeguarding of Cultural Heritage in Mali, Syria, Iraq, Libya and Yemen requires additional financial and human resources at the World Heritage Centre and in the UNESCO field offices; also notes the increased demands on the resources of the Advisory Bodies;
  8. Calls on the international community to provide financial support for the implementation of the UNESCO Action Plans for the Emergency Safeguarding of Cultural Heritage in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Yemen, including for additional human resources at the World Heritage Centre and in the UNESCO field offices;
  9. Also expresses its utmost concern about the impacts of conflicts causing an escalation of the already severe poaching crisis, as armed groups are financing their activities through illegal wildlife trade, which is having a severe impact on African wildlife, threatening the very survival of species and the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of World Heritage properties;
  10. Launches an appeal to all Member States of UNESCO to cooperate in the fight against the illicit trafficking of cultural heritage objects and illegal wildlife trade, including through the implementation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the ratification of the 1970 Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property and to pursue the implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 2199 of February 2015 regarding Syria and Iraq;

    Other conservation issues

    Reconstruction

  11. Noting that the recent and wide-ranging deliberate destruction of World Heritage properties as a result of armed conflict in Syria, Yemen, Libya, Iraq, Mali and Nigeria, and the devastating earthquakes in Nepal, have brought sharply into focus the issue of reconstruction in World Heritage properties; that several international meetings have taken place or are being planned on reconstruction; and that guidance within the Operational Guidelines is currently inadequate,
  12. Recommends that more in depth reflection is needed on reconstruction within World Heritage properties as a complex multi-disciplinary process, and that consideration should be given to developing new guidance to reflect the multi-faceted challenges that reconstruction brings, its social and economic context, the short- and long-term needs of properties, and the idea of reconstruction as a process that should be undertaken within the framework of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the properties;
  13. Welcomes the offer of the Government of Poland to host an international conference on Reconstruction to provide guidelines to the World Heritage Committee;

    Climate Change
  14. Taking note of the agreement reached during the 21st conference (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) held in 2015, requests the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to assist States Parties to implement appropriate management responses to the adverse effects of Climate Change;
  15. Recommends that the World Heritage Centre strengthen its relations with other organizations working on Climate Change, particularly with the UNFCCC and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) secretariats, and specifically with regard to the effect of Climate Change on World Heritage properties, and also requests the States Parties, the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to work with IPCC with the objective of including a specific chapter on natural and cultural World Heritage in future IPCC assessment reports;
  16. Further requests the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to periodically review and update the “Policy Document on the Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage properties”, so as to make available the most current knowledge and technology on the subject to guide the decisions and actions of the World Heritage community;

    Dams
  17. Notes with significant concern that an increasing number of properties are facing potential threats from major dam projects, considers that the construction of dams with large reservoirs within the boundaries of World Heritage properties is incompatible with their World Heritage status, and urges States Parties to ensure that the impacts from dams that could affect properties located upstream or downstream within the same river basin are rigorously assessed in order to avoid impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);

    Extractive industries
  18. Noting with significant concern that World Heritage properties are increasingly threatened by extractive industries, as confirmed by the 2014 IUCN World Heritage Outlook report, by the World Heritage Centre’s analysis of issues reported in state of conservation reports also revealing the potential threat from extractive activities to cultural properties, and by the 2016 report by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), welcomes the “No-go” commitments to World Heritage properties made by Tullow Oil plc and CEMEX in November 2015 and April 2016 respectively, and reiterates its call on other extractive industry companies and investment banks to follow these examples to further extend the “No-go” commitment;
  19. Recalling Decision 37 COM 7, once again urges all States Parties to the Convention and leading industry stakeholders to respect the “No-go” commitment by not permitting extractive activities within World Heritage properties, and by making every effort to ensure that extractives companies located in their territory cause no damage to World Heritage properties, in line with Article 6 of the Convention;

    Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs)/Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs)
  20. Notes with concern that a majority of properties potentially affected by proposed development projects, proposed legal instruments, and proposed management systems have not benefited from an assessment of impacts on their Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment and ICOMOS’ Guidance on Heritage Impact Assessments for Cultural World Heritage Properties, and requests all States Parties to the Convention to ensure that potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts on the OUV, including from projects located outside the boundaries of natural and/or cultural World Heritage properties, are specifically assessed within the framework of the EIA and HIA required by the applicable laws and regulations, and that reports of such assessments are submitted to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  21. Recalls Article 6 of the Convention according to which “Each State Party to this Convention undertakes not to take any deliberate measures which might damage directly or indirectly the cultural and natural heritage […] situated on the territory of other States Parties to this Convention”, and also requests all States Parties to the Convention to ensure that EIAs and HIAs include an assessment of impacts on the OUV of World Heritage properties situated on the territory of other States Parties, as appropriate;
  22. Further requests the Advisory Bodies, in consultation with the World Heritage Centre, to consider opportunities to streamline their guidance on impact assessment in order to develop one single guidance document for the assessment of impacts on both natural and cultural properties;

    Integrated management, Decision making, Governance
  23. Noting with concern that the lack of an integrated management approach is reported to cause challenges to the coordination of management and decision making processes of properties where different authorities are involved, in particular in the cases of mixed, serial, and transboundary properties, urges States Parties to establish appropriate mechanisms in order to facilitate a coordinated approach to the management of all properties, in line with the requirements of the Operational Guidelines as laid out in Paragraphs 112, 114, and 135, and encourages States Parties with contiguous natural properties on either side of their international borders, which are not listed as transboundary properties, to establish appropriate mechanisms for cooperation between their respective management authorities and ministries;
  24. Also encourages States Parties to promote recognition and awareness across all relevant national and regional agencies of the World Heritage status of the properties on their territory, and to develop mechanisms to ensure consideration of impacts on Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) in the decision making processes of relevant ministries, before permits are issued for developments that could negatively impact the OUV;

    Ground transport infrastructures
  25. Notes with concern that the number of cases of ground transport infrastructure having potential impact on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of World Heritage properties is continuing to grow, and calls upon States Parties to carry out Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs) early in the process of transportation planning to allow for potential impacts of the OUV, including those resulting from foreseeable associated future developments, to be identified prior to the development of specific projects;
  26. Encourages States Parties to carry out Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and Heritage Impact Assessments (HIA) on ground transport projects, once they are designed, with multiple options to ensure that transportation needs can be met with minimal impacts on the OUV of World Heritage properties;

    List of World Heritage in Danger
  27. Takes note of its discussions under agenda items 7A and 7B, and requests the World Heritage Centre, in consultation with the Advisory Bodies and States Parties, to promote better understanding of the implications and benefits of properties being inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger, and to develop appropriate information material in this regard with a view to overcome the negative perceptions of the List of World Heritage in Danger. The information material should highlight the importance of the protection of the OUV;

    Reactive Monitoring
  28. Requests the World Heritage Centre, in cooperation with the Advisory Bodies to evaluate the effectiveness of the Reactive Monitoring including procedures and case studies and to present a preliminary report for the consideration by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018, if funds are available.

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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6817 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.1 City of Potosi (Bolivia, Plurinational State of) (C 420) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.44, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the efforts made by the State Party in view of the establishment of a Supra Organic Management Body to ensure an effective and integral management mechanism for the property and its components and urges the State Party to finalize
  4. Notes with concern the standstill of stabilization works at the summit of Cerro Rico and also urges the State Party to take all the necessary measures to proceed with the stabilization works;
  5. Further urges the State Party to finalize the process to adopt a new legislation to address the issue of the relocation of miners and enforcing the moratorium for all explorations between altitudes 4,400m and 4,700m;
  6. Regrets that the State Party was not able to develop a proposal for the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) nor the Integral Management Plan in the framework of the International Assistance granted by the World Heritage Fund;
  7. Reiterates its requests to the State Party to develop as a matter of urgency, in consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, a proposal for the DSOCR and a set of corrective measures, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  8. Requests the State Party to establish a clear management structure for the property, with appropriate articulation between the various bodies and committees, to urgently proceed with the elaboration of an Integrated Management Plan, and to include in this process the elaboration of land use regulation for the property and its surrounding areas in order to define a buffer zone to protect the visually sensitive areas around the property;
  9. Notes with appreciation the approval of the Law for the Preservation of the Historic Zone of City of Potosí and also requests the State Party to develop an integral conservation strategy before implementing any major restoration works at the property;
  10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to retain City of Potosí (Bolivia (Plurinational State of)) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6617 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.2 Humberstone and Santa Laura Saltpeter Works (Chile) (C 1178bis) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.45, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Commends the State Party for its commitment to the full and timely implementation of the corrective measures and for the progress made in a period in which the State Party also had to respond to severe damages caused by the earthquake of 2014;
  4. Acknowledges that the allocation of dedicated staff and resources, efficient planning and coordination among national and local institutions are key factors in the successful implementation of the corrective measures, and particularly welcomes the participation of the University Arturo Prat as a means to transmit knowledge of traditional construction techniques and materials of the property to the young generation of architecture students;
  5. Encourages the State Party to continue the implementation of the corrective measures with the aim to achieve the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) within the established framework;
  6. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  7. Decides to retain Humberstone and Santa Laura Saltpeter Works (Chile) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6618 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.3 Fortifications on the Caribbean Side of Panama: Portobelo-San Lorenzo (Panama) (C 135) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.46, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. While regretting that the set of corrective measures adopted at the time of inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger was not implemented within the timeframe 2012-2015, appreciates the State Party’s renewed commitment to take all necessary measures for the proper conservation and management of the property;
  4. Welcomes the strategy, programme and timeframe that are now submitted by the State Party that will ensure the implementation of the corrective measures in the period 2016-2019 with the aim of achieving the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) in 2019;
  5. Urges the State Party to take all the necessary legal, institutional, managerial and financial measures to ensure the full implementation of the corrective measures and to inform the Committee in its annual reports on the progress made;
  6. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  7. Decides to retain the Fortifications on the Caribbean Side of Panama: Portobelo-San Lorenzo (Panama) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6619 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.4 Chan Chan Archaeological Zone (Peru) (C 366) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.47, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Commends the State Party for the implementation of most of the corrective measures towards achieving the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) and encourages the State Party to continue its efforts for their implementation;
  4. Notes with appreciation the significant efforts invested by the local, regional and national authorities, as well as the international and interinstitutional agreement for the implementation of research, conservation and maintenance activities for the conservation of the property, in particular in the framework of the El Niño Southern Oscillation Prevention Programme (ENSO);
  5. Welcomes the establishment of an Earthen Architecture Laboratory, the development of studies of construction technologies and materials, and meteorological research, as well as the creation of Executing Unit 009 to reinforce the management of the property and the interinstitutional cooperation between the Special Chan Chan Archaeological Complex Project (PECACH) and the Decentralized Directorate of Culture of La Libertad;
  6. Notes the submission of the Interinstitutional Cooperation agreement for the renovation of the site museum and also encourages the State Party to finalize its approval and start its implementation;
  7. Acknowledges the commitment expressed by the State Party to develop the updating of the Archaeological Intervention Manual and the Integral Risk Prevention Plan as requested by Decision 39 COM 7A.47 and requests the State Party to submit them to the World Heritage Centre as soon as they become available, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  8. Also notes the progress achieved in the definition of the delimitation process of the property’s buffer zone and urges the State Party to finalize this process and elaborate its regulatory measures in collaboration with all concerned stakeholders;
  9. Reiterates its request to the State Party to finalize the approval process of:
    1. the updated version of the Master Plan for the Conservation and Management of the property as soon as possible, taking into account the views of all stakeholders, an electronic copy and three printed copies of which should be provided to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies,
    2. Law 28261, to ensure that the property is adequately protected from illegal occupation and seek for supplementary solutions to this issue;
  10. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to retain Chan Chan Archaeological Zone (Peru) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6620 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.5 Coro and its Port (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of) (C 658) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.48, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Appreciates the initiative of the State Party to invite an ICOMOS Advisory mission, welcomes the progress reported in the implementation of the corrective measures adopted in Decision 38 COM 7A.23 and expresses its appreciation for the steady progress in the conservation and restoration of both public and private property, as well as the extensive programme for the promotion and transmission of traditional know-how;
  4. Also appreciates the efforts made by the State Party in the completion of the boundary clarification requested in the framework of the Retrospective Inventory process;
  5. Takes note of the preliminary proposal submitted for the extension of the buffer zone of the component Coro and requests the State Party to formally submit this proposal, as a Minor Boundary Modification, according to paragraphs 163-165 of the Operational Guidelines;
  6. Considers that the two main outstanding matters that should be addressed to complete the set of corrective measures are the preparation of the Management Plan and the implementation of effective drainage systems, and also requests the State Party to continue the implementation of all corrective measures and, in particular, to take the necessary measures to prepare the Management Plan and effective drainage systems;
  7. Also considers that once these corrective measures are effectively implemented, an assessment could then be made to check whether the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) is achieved;
  8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  9. Decides to retain Coro and its Port (Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6621 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.6 Timbuktu (Mali) (C 119rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.21, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Regrets that the State Party was unable to submit a state of conservation report of the property, as requested by the Committee;
  4. Congratulates the State Party for the significant work undertaken in the reconstruction of the 14 Saint mausoleums destroyed during the occupation period of Timbuktu in 2012 and thanks the partners who provided support in the framework of the Mali Rehabilitation of Cultural Heritage project and requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre the reconstruction strategy that guided this work and the architectural and archaeological studies carried out, so that the principles underpinning this reconstruction work are clearly documented and the role of the Corporation of Masons fully appreciated;
  5. Expresses its concern regarding the fragility of the security situation at Timbuktu preventing the State Party from inviting the requested joint UNESCO/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to evaluate the general state of conservation of the property;
  6. Notes with satisfaction the organization in Bamako of an evaluation meeting on the state of conservation of the property based on all the technical missions, studies and activity reports carried out, as well as observations and comments of the site managers and representatives of local communities, enabling the preparation of corrective measures and the preparation of a Desired State of Conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  7. Adopts the following corrective measures to ensure the conditions of integrity and authenticity of the property:
    1. For the conservation of the physical components of the property:
      1. Carry out the restoration/rehabilitation work for the two mosques of Sankoré and Sidi Yahia to strengthen their stability and safeguarding, and establish a participatory management mechanism closely involving the Imams,
      2. Establish and implement control measures concerning the silting up of the physical components of the property,
      3. Rehabilitate fencing around the cemeteries where the World Heritage mausoleums are located in order to strengthen security,
    2. For the protection and management of the property:
      1. Revise and implement the management and conservation plan for the property and the buffer zones, taking into account risk management, threats concerning the Outstanding Universal Value of the property and a plan for preventive and remedial conservation activities for the components of the property,
      2. Identify short- middle- and long-term funding sources to guarantee the implementation of the management plan,
      3. Prepare a geo-referenced map indicating the boundaries of the buffer zones for each of the components,
      4. Update and implement urban regulations in the periphery of the inscribed property, the ancient fabric and buffer zones and evaluate their efficiency,
      5. Prepare a maintenance manual and conservation plan for the reconstructed mausoleums,
      6. Re-energize the Management Committee for all components of the property involving the municipal authorities concerned,
      7. Strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of the actors and professionals involved in the management and conservation of the property,
      8. Strengthen the operational capacities of the management structure of the property: allocation of necessary budget for urgent conservation activities,
      9. Improve the security situation at the mosques and mausoleums and more generally throughout the entire town;
  8. Calls upon the international community to support the State Party, in co-operation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, in any way possible for priority conservation and management measures, and capacity building programmes;
  9. Requests the State Party to invite a joint UNESCO/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to evaluate the general state of conservation of the property and progress achieved in the implementation of the corrective measures, once the situation in northern Mali is stabilized;
  10. Also requests the State Party to finalize, in consultation with the World Heritage Centre, ICOMOS and ICCROM, the DSOCR proposal and a precise timetable for implementation, and to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 February 2017, as far as is possible, for adoption by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above-mentioned points, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to continue the application of the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism for the property;
  13. Also decides to retain Timbuktu (Mali) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6622 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.7 Tomb of the Askia (Mali) (C 1139) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.22, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Regrets that the State Party was unable to submit a state of conservation report on the property, as requested by the Committee;
  4. Expresses its concern regarding the unstable security situation at Gao preventing the State Party from inviting the requested joint UNESCO/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to evaluate the general state of conservation of the property;
  5. Also expresses its concern that the property remains under threat as regards its architectural components and the conservation and management mechanism and requests the State Party to accelerate, together with support from its partners, the implementation of the project for the Rehabilitation of Cultural Heritage at Gao;
  6. Notes with satisfaction the organization in Bamako of an evaluation meeting on the state of conservation of the property based on all the technical missions, studies and activity reports, and notes and comments of site managers and representatives of the local communities, enabling the establishment of corrective measures and the initial preparation of the Desired state of conservation for removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  7. Adopts the following corrective measures to ensure the conditions of integrity and authenticity of the property:
    1. For the conservation of the physical components of the property:
      1. Implement the restoration and rehabilitation work for the different components of the property to ensure their stability and consolidation,
      2. Establish and implement control measures relating to the silting up of the physical components of the property and carry out drainage and sand removal from the courtyards of the property;
      3. Safeguard and preserve the cultural and symbolic characteristics of the necropolis: 1) secure its stability with regard to the erosive action of rainwater, 2) correct the repair errors on the enclosure that affect its authenticity, 3) promote its integration into a coherent ensemble with the white stone square,
      4. Improve the amenities of the buildings, in this case, the men’s prayer rooms,
      5. Safeguard and preserve the architectural characteristics (typo-morphological) of the buffer zone,
    2. For the protection and management of the property:
      1. Revise and implement the Conservation and Management Plan for the property and the buffer zones, taking into account a risk management plan, threats to the outstanding universal value of the property and a timetable for the preventive and remedial conservation of the components of the property,
      2. Identify funding sources for the short-, medium- and long-term, to guarantee the implementation of this management plan,
      3. Prepare a conservation guide for the components of the property indicating the periodic evaluation mechanism for its state of conservation,
      4. Strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of the actors and professionals involved in the management and conservation of the property,
      5. Strengthen the operational capacities of the management structure of the property: allocation of a budget required for urgent conservation activities,
  8. Calls upon the international community to support the State Party, in co-operation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, in any way possible for priority conservation and management measures, and capacity building programmes;
  9. Also requests the State Party to invite a joint UNESCO/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to evaluate the general state of conservation of the property and progress accomplished in the implementation of the corrective measures, once the situation in northern Mali is stabilized;
  10. Further requests the State Party to complete, in consultation with the World Heritage Centre, ICOMOS and ICCROM, the proposed DSOCR and a clear timeframe for implementation, and to submit them to the World Heritage Centre, if possible, by 1 February 2017, for adoption by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Requests furthermore that the State Party submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to continue the application of the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism of the property;
  13. Decides to retain Tomb of Askia (Mali) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6623 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.8 Tombs of Buganda Kings at Kasubi (Uganda) (C 1022) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.23, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Notes that the State Party has halted all developments at the property pending the completion of the Master Plan;
  4. Notes with concern that no progress has been reported with the development of the Master Plan that was requested in 2012, as part of the corrective measures, in order to ensure that conservation of the Muzibu-Azaala-Mpanga, and other buildings, and development proposals such as for fire-fighting, visitor management and the widening of the road, are all undertaken in an integrated way within an agreed framework;
  5. Urges the State Party to progress with the development of this Master Plan and ensure that it encompasses:
    1. Ways to support Ganda architectural principles, materials, and building traditions alive, and the harmonized aesthetic of the property, and an integrated plan for development proposals, such as the provision of a reservoir and a fire-fighting system, alterations to the entrance, implementation of a visitor route or development of tourism facilities such as restaurants, and the widening of the road,
    2. A detailed site plan of the property that contains all the structures on the property, as it is now and a plan to show what is envisaged as development proposals;
  6. Also notes the revised timeline and planning for the reconstruction of the Muzibu-Azaala-Mpanga and considers that these need to be integrated into the Master Plan;
  7. Requests the State Party to provide a draft Master Plan to the World Heritage Centre by 1 February 2017, for review by the Advisory Bodies, in order to allow urgently needed work to recommence on the property;
  8. Also requests the State Party to provide the World Heritage Centre with details of the proposed plans for the firefighting equipment proposed for the property, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  9. Further notes the revised management structure and the ongoing work management plan, including focusing on the disaster risk management plan and tourism management;
  10. Further requests the State Party to:
    1. Ensure that work on the reconstruction of the Muzibu-Azaala-Mpanga maintains the highest standards of quality under the supervision of the project architect,
    2. Complete the management plan for the property, and integrate a much more detailed disaster risk management plan (for fire and other potential hazards) and a tourism management plan which emphasizes the protection of the attributes of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), for review by the Advisory Bodies,
    3. Develop adequate mechanisms for communication and exchange amongst all of the stakeholders of the property to ensure that all concerns related to both conservation and social issues are dealt with in a positive manner,
    4. Provide details of the proposed widening of the Masiro Road to show that it does not encroach on the property or the bark cloth trees that line the edge of the property,
    5. Prepare detailed plans for the conservation of the Bujjabukua given its deteriorating state of conservation, so that work can begin once the Master Plan is in place; some of the thatch that is already prepared but sitting unused might be used for this important work;
  11. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to retain Tombs of Buganda Kings at Kasubi (Uganda) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6624 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.9 Abu Mena (Egypt) (C 90) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examinedDocument WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. RecallingDecisions 38 COM 7A.1 and 39 COM 7A.24, adopted at its 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Notes that encroachments by local communities have been removed from the property and buffer zone;
  4. Expresses its great concern regarding the state of conservation of the property and the implementation level of the recommended corrective measures;
  5. Takes note that the State Party will start the elaboration of a comprehensive and integrated Management Plan for the property in 2017;
  6. Urges the State Party to resume the implementation of the corrective measures, to protect and conserve the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, with particular attention to the following issues:
    1. Prepare a conservation plan for the property, which includes a condition survey and the identification of priority interventions to ensure stabilization of archaeological remains,
    2. Initiate consultations with stakeholders including local communities to develop a programme for the removal of inadequate new constructions and the creation of facilities to allow for religious uses in areas outside the boundaries of the property and its buffer zone;
  7. Also urgesthe State Party, and in particular its Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Irrigation, to undertake an analysis of ways to address the underlying causes of the rising water table and elaborate a project to address those causes as well as mitigation measures for the archaeological remains once the water table has been lowered and stabilized;
  8. Requests the World Heritage Centre to assist the State Party in providing adequate expertise thereon, and suggests that the State Party might consider inviting a technical Advisory mission to the property, to be paid for by the State Party, to provide advice on appropriate irrigation and water management technologies;
  9. Also requeststhe State Party to submit a revised modification of the boundaries of both the property and buffer zone, in accordance with Paragraphs 163-165 of the Operational Guidelines, for examination by the World Heritage Committee;
  10. Further requeststhe State Party to submit, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, details of all on-going or planned restoration interventions at the property, particularly those at the Great Basilica, the reburial strategy, and visitor centre project, as well as initiatives arising from the project for restoration and rehabilitation of the property prepared by the Ministry of Antiquities and the Abu Mena Monastery administration, for review prior to implementation, such details to include Heritage Impact Assessments (HIA);
  11. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to retain Abu Mena (Egypt) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6625 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.10 Ashur (Qal'at Sherqat) (Iraq) (C 1130) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.25, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Encourages the State Party to pursue its efforts to ensure the protection of the property, despite the impossibility to access it;
  4. Expresses its great concern about the absence of information on the state of conservation of the property and requests the State Party to keep the World Heritage Centre informed of the evolution of the situation on the ground;
  5. Calls upon all the UNESCO Member States to comply with the provisions of the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict with Regulations for the Execution of the Convention 1954 and the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property 1970, and to cooperate to fight the illicit trafficking of cultural heritage coming from Iraq, pursuant to Resolution 2199 of the United Nations Security Council, adopted in February 2015;
  6. Also calls upon the international community to further support the safeguarding of Iraqi cultural heritage through earmarked funds;
  7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  8. Decides to retain Ashur (Qal'at Sherqat) (Iraq) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6626 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.11 Hatra (Iraq) (C 277rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.51, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Encourages the State Party to pursue its efforts to ensure the protection of the property, despite the impossibility to access it;
  4. Expresses its great concern about the absence of information on the state of conservation of the property and requests the State Party to keep the World Heritage Centre informed of the evolution of the situation on the ground;
  5. Calls upon all the UNESCO Member States to comply with the provisions of the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict with Regulations for the Execution of the Convention 1954 and the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property 1970, and to cooperate to fight the illicit trafficking of cultural heritage coming from Iraq, pursuant to Resolution 2199 of the United Nations Security Council, adopted in February 2015;
  6. Also calls upon the international community to further support the safeguarding of Iraqi cultural heritage through earmarked funds;
  7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  8. Decides to retain Hatra (Iraq) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6627 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.12 Samarra Archaeological City (Iraq) (C 276 rev) The World Heritage Committee, 

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.26, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Encourages the State Party to pursue its efforts to ensure the protection of the property, despite the impossibility to acces it;
  4. Expresses its great concern about the absence of information on the state of conservation of the property and requests the State Party to keep the World Heritage Centre informed of the evolution of the situation on the ground;
  5. Calls upon all the UNESCO Member States to comply with the provisions of the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and its two Protocols with Regulations for the Execution of the Convention 1954 and the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property 1970, and to cooperate to fight the illicit trafficking of cultural heritage coming from Iraq, pursuant to Resolution 2199 of the United Nations Security Council, adopted in February 2015;
  6. Also calls upon the international community to further support the safeguarding of Iraqi cultural heritage through earmarked funds;
  7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  8. Decides to retain Samarra Archaeological City (Iraq) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6628 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.13 Old City of Jerusalem and its Walls (site proposed by Jordan) (C 148 rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC-16/40.COM/7A.Add2,
  2. Recalling the relevant provisions on the protection of cultural heritage including the four Geneva Conventions (1949), the Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict of 1954 and its related protocols, the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property (1970), the Convention for the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage of 1972, the Delhi UNESCO Recommendation of 1956 concerning excavations undertaken in occupied territories, the inscription of the Old City of Jerusalem and its Walls at the request of Jordan on the World Heritage List (1981) and on the List of World Heritage in Danger (1982) and related recommendations, resolutions and decisions of UNESCO,
  3. Reaffirming that nothing in the present decision, which aims at the safeguarding of the authenticity, integrity and cultural heritage of the Old City of Jerusalem on both sides of its Walls, shall in any way affect the relevant United Nations resolutions and decisions, in particular the relevant Security Council resolutions on the legal status of Jerusalem,

    I

  4. Deeply concerned by the Israeli illegal archeological excavations and works conducted by the Israeli occupation authorities and settler groups in the Old City of Jerusalem and on both sides of its Walls and the failure of Israel to cease such harmful interventions, requests Israel to timely stop all such activities, in conformity with its obligations under the provisions of related UNESCO Conventions and recommendations;
  5. Regrets the damage caused by the Israeli security forces on 30th October 2014 to the historic Gates and windows of the Qibli Mosque inside Al-Aqsa Mosque/ Al-Haram Al-Sharif, which is a Muslim holy site of worship and an integral part of a World Heritage Site;
  6. Calls on Israel to stop the closure of Al-Rahmah Gate building, one of Al-Aqsa Mosque / Al-Haram Al-Sharif gates, and to allow all necessary renovation works thereof, in order to fix damage caused by the weather conditions;
  7. Also calls on Israel to facilitate the immediate execution of all 19 Hashemite restoration projects in and around Al-Aqsa Mosque/Al Haram Al-Sharif;
  8. Deplores the damaging effect of the Jerusalem Light rail (tram line) at few meters from the Walls of the Old City of Jerusalem which severely affect the visual integrity and the authentic character of the site and requests Israel to restore the original character of the site in conformity with its obligations under the provisions of related UNESCO Conventions and recommendations;
  9. Also deplores the Israeli plan to build a two-line cable car system in East Jerusalem, the construction of the so called “Liba House” project in the Old City of Jerusalem, the demolition and new construction of the so-called Strauss Building, and the project of the Western Wall elevator, the digging of a Mamluk structure beneath the Western Wall, the excavations and construction of new levels underneath the Western Wall, and urges Israel to renounce to the above mentioned projects in conformity with its obligations under the provisions of related UNESCO Conventions and recommendations as well as UNESCO Decisions particularly the World Heritage Committee decision 37 COM 7A.26, 38 COM 7A.4 and 39 COM 7A.27 and to provide the World Heritage Centre with all related documentation in particular the documentation concerning the historic remains found at the above mentioned projects;
  10. Expresses its deep concern regarding the initially approved plan for the so called “Kedem Center” a visitors centre near the southern wall of Al-Aqsa Mosque/Al-Haram Al-Sharif, which severally affects the visual integrity and the authentic character of the site and requests Israel to return the remains and to provide the relevant documentation thereof as well as to restore the original character of the site;
  11. Requests the Israeli authorities to allow unrestricted access of the competent national authorities including the Jordanian Waqf experts to safeguard the Old City of Jerusalem and both sides of its Walls;
  12. Welcomes the relative improvement of Muslim worshippers' access into Al-Aqsa Mosque/ Al-Haram Al-Sharif over the past seven months, and encourages Israel to continue to implement and further expand measures to prevent provocative incidents, such as Israeli extremist groups’ storming of Al-Aqsa Mosque / Al Haram Al Sharif, that violate the sanctity and integrity of the Al-Aqsa Mosque/ Al-Haram Al-Sharif that may inflame tension on the ground;
  13. Further regrets the damage by Israel, of the historic ceramics atop of the main gates of the Dome of the Rock and the damage of the historic gates and windows of the Qibli Mosque inside Al-Aqsa Mosque/Al-Haram Al-Sharif as well as the damage of Umayyad, Ottoman and Mamluk remains of the site of Mughrabi Gate Pathway and reaffirms, in this regard, the necessity to respect and safeguard the integrity, authenticity and cultural heritage of Al-Aqsa Mosque /Al-Haram Al-Sharif, as reflected in the Status Quo, as a Muslim Holy Site of worship and as an integral part of a World Cultural Heritage site;
  14. Requests the World Heritage Centre to continue applying the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism to the Old City of Jerusalem on both sides of its Walls, and also requests it to report every four months on this matter;
  15. Also thanks the Director-General of UNESCO and the World Heritage Centre for their efforts aimed at the Safeguarding of the Cultural Heritage of the Old City of Jerusalem on both sides of its walls and invites them to report on this matter at the 41st session of the World Heritage Committee in 2017;

    II

  16. Recalling 176 EX/Special Plenary Meeting Decision, and all UNESCO Executive Board Decisions relating to the Ascent to the Mughrabi Gate in the Old City of Jerusalem,
  17. Taking note of the Reinforced Monitoring Reports and their addenda prepared by the World Heritage Centre as well as the State of Conservation reports submitted to the World Heritage Centre by Jordan and Palestine and by Israel, the de facto administrating authority,
  18. Expresses its growing concern regarding the continuous, intrusive archeological demolitions and excavations in and around the Mughrabi Gate Ascent, and the latest excavation works conducted at the beginning of May 2015 at the Western Wall of Al-Aqsa Mosque/ Al-Haram Al-Sharif, and calls on Israel to stop such intrusive archeological demolitions and excavations, respect the Status Quo, and enable the Jordanian Waqf experts as a part of the competent authorities to maintain and safeguard the site in accordance with the relevant provisions of the UNESCO Conventions and Recommendations;
  19. Acknowledges receipt of the Jordanian design for the restoration and preservation of the Mughrabi Ascent, submitted to the World Heritage Centre on 27 May 2011, and thanks Jordan for its cooperation in accordance with the provisions of the relevant UNESCO Conventions for the Protection of Cultural Heritage;
  20. Urges Israel, in conformity with its obligations under the provisions of the UNESCO related Conventions, to cooperate with Jordanian Waqf Department and experts to facilitate the restoration of the Ascent to the Mughrabi Gate;
  21. Thanks the Director-General for her attention to the sensitive situation of the Ascent to the Mughrabi Gate as an integral part of Al-Aqsa Mosque/ Al-Haram Al-Sharif and calls upon her to consult with all concerned parties in order to enable the restoration works of the Ascent to the Mughrabi Gate;

    III

  22. Recalls the Executive Board decisions concerning the Reactive Monitoring mission to the Old City of Jerusalem and its Walls particularly decision 196EX/Decision26.4 as well as the World Heritage Committee decisions particularly Decision 34 COM 7A.20;
  23. Stresses the need of the urgent implementation of the above mentioned UNESCO Mission;
  24. Urges Israel, to accept and facilitate the implementation of that technical expert Mission;
  25. Thanks the Director-General for her continuous efforts to implement the above-mentioned UNESCO mission and all related UNESCO decisions and resolutions, and invites her to report on this matter at the next 41st World Heritage Committee session;

    IV

  26. Decides to retain the Old City of Jerusalem and its Walls on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6818 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.14 Birthplace of Jesus: Church of the Nativity and the Pilgrimage Route, Bethlehem (Palestine) (C 1433) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.28, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Notes that conservation works for the roof of the Church of the Nativity have been completed and acknowledges the progress made in addressing conservation conditions at the architectural ensemble and the rehabilitation works undertaken at other areas in the property;
  4. Also notes that a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Advisory mission will be carried out at the property and will allow evaluating the restoration works that have been carried out at the Church of the Nativity, and discussing with the State Party the contents of an Integrated Conservation Plan for past and future interventions;
  5. Requests the State Party to develop the Integrated Conservation Plan, as per the adopted corrective measures, which should include in one synthetic document, among other items, the following:
    1. Systematized condition assessment that includes all existing condition recording surveys, analysis and historic documentation,
    2. Identification of attributes which embody specific values according to the evolution of the ensemble and its character defining features,
    3. Overarching conservation philosophy and specific principles for conservation interventions in accordance to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property and other relevant local values,
    4. Costed and prioritised conservation action plan for all component parts of the architectural ensemble with a timeframe for implementation,
    5. Additional measures for presentation, interpretation, environmental control, fire prevention, risk preparedness, maintenance and monitoring;
  6. Also requests to the State Party to prioritize and secure the necessary resources for the development of the Management Plan for the property and to provide an electronic and three printed copies of the Plan for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
  7. Reiterates its request to the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, concept proposals for the Manger Square Tunnel and the Manger Square village before plans are finalised or commitments made to their implementation;
  8. Further notes the request made by the State Party to remove the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger but considers that the planned Advisory mission will allow discussing this request with the State Party to ensure full implementation of the corrective measures before the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger;
  9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  10. Decides to retain Birthplace of Jesus: Church of the Nativity and the Pilgrimage Route, Bethlehem (Palestine) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6629 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.15 Palestine: Land of Olives and Vines – Cultural Landscape of Southern Jerusalem, Battir (Palestine) (C 1492) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.29, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Takes notes of the actions undertaken by the State Party to initiate the implementation of the corrective measures adopted to achieve the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  4. Expresses its disappointment that a timeframe for implementing the agreed corrective measures has not been submitted as requested, and reiterates its request to the State Party to develop and submit a timeframe for the full implementation of the adopted corrective measures by 1 February 2017, for examination by the Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  5. Notes progress with the process to elaborate the Conservation and Management Plan (CMP), with funding through International Assistance, and recommends that the corrective measures are adequately integrated into the CMP under elaboration;
  6. Urges the State Party to put in place, as soon as possible, a robust management system for the property and its buffer zone, for taking forward the defined infrastructure and other projects needed to support traditional agricultural systems with or without external funding and, until the CMP is established and operational, to submit all construction projects to the World Heritage Centre for review;
  7. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  8. Decides to retain Palestine: Land of Olives and Vines – Cultural Landscape of Southern Jerusalem, Battir (Palestine) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6630 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.16 Ancient City of Aleppo (Syrian Arab Republic) (C 21) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.57, 38 COM 7A.12 and 39 COM 7A.36,adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Taking into account Decision 40 COM 7A.22 on the World Heritage properties of the Syrian Arab Republic, adopted at its 40th session (Istanbul, 2016),
  4. Expresses its great concern at the continuous escalation of the armed conflict and resulting humanitarian crisis and irreversible destruction within the property, including of whole neighbourhoods;
  5. Requests that, as soon as access to the property becomes possible, humanitarian and security actions be done in coordination with cultural heritage stakeholders, to avoid further irreversible damages to the property, and allow for undertaking of first-aid measures on its cultural heritage;
  6. Considers that before any work is undertaken at the property, detailed studies and extensive field work are required, and also discussions on defining optimal approaches including considerations that go beyond technical issues;
  7. Decides to retain the Ancient City of Aleppo (Syrian Arab Republic) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6631 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.17 Ancient City of Bosra (Syrian Arab Republic) (C 22) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.57, 38 COM 7A.12 and 39 COM 7A.36, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Taking into account Decision 40 COM 7A.22 on the World Heritage properties of the Syrian Arab Republic, adopted at its 40th session (Istanbul, 2016),
  4. Acknowledges the efforts of the local communities to raise awareness of the need to protect the property despite the very difficult circumstances;
  5. Deplores the breaking of the temporary ceasefire agreement within the property in December 2015 which resulted in further severe damages and illegal excavations;
  6. Urges all parties to pursue all possible cooperation for ensuring the respect of a ceasefire within the property;
  7. Decides to retain the Ancient City of Bosra (Syrian Arab Republic) on the List of World Heritage in Danger
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6632 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.18 Ancient City of Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic) (C 20bis) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.57, 38 COM 7A.12, and 39 COM 7A.36, adopted at 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Taking into account Decision 40 COM 7A.22 on the World Heritage properties of the Syrian Arab Republic, adopted at its 40th session (Istanbul, 2016),
  4. Expresses its deep concern over the damage caused by the conflict, and the fire at al-Asrooniya neighbourhood within the property, and requests the State Party to submit a detailed report on the damage caused by the fire;
  5. Also requests the State Party to engage in regular communication and consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies on ongoing emergency first-aid interventions at the property and on future urban plans for the al-Asrooniya neighbourhood; and in particular to:
    1. Limit conservation or restoration to first aid interventions until the security situation improves,
    2. Take immediate action to save the remaining structures through adequate shoring and temporary consolidation measures,
    3. In order to recover the social-economic life of al-Asrooniya and other neighbourhoods, develop restoration and reconstruction guidelines, in collaboration with the Advisory Bodies and the World Heritage Centre, that take into account existing documentation and surveys before and after the fire, and the particular social and economic needs of the areas,
    4. Submit to the World Heritage Centre for review by ICOMOS and approval by the World Heritage Committee, reconstruction and restoration plans in al-Asrooniya neighbourhood prior to the commencement of any works;
  6. Urges the State Party to plan and implement all necessary risk-prevention and mitigation plans outlined in the Emergency Response Plan of December 2013, and to report back to the World Heritage Centre on the progress made thereon;
  7. Also urges all parties associated with the situation in Syria to refrain from any action that could cause further damage to the Ancient City of Damascus, including preventing the use of cultural property and prominent architectural elements, in particular the Suleymaniye and Omayyad Mosque Minarets, for military purposes;
  8. Takes note that the State Party has invited a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to evaluate the state of conservation of the property and identify measures needed to reverse the decay and ensure the conservation and protection of the property,and that the mission is foreseen end of 2016, provided that the security situation allows;
  9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  10. Decides to retain the Ancient City of Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6633 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.19 Ancient villages of Northern Syria (Syrian Arab Republic) (C 1348) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.57, 38 COM 7A.12 and 39 COM 7A.36, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Taking into account Decision 40 COM 7A.22 on the World Heritage properties of the Syrian Arab Republic, adopted at its 40th session (Istanbul, 2016),
  4. Expresses its deep concern about the escalation of the conflict and the reported damages at the property, including at Saint-Simeon, as well as the illegal re-use of archaeological material and inappropriate new construction;
  5. Decides to retain the Ancient Villages of Northern Syria (Syrian Arab Republic) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6634 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.20 Crac des chevaliers and Qal’at Salah El-Din (Syrian Arab Republic) (C 1229) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.57, 38 COM 7A.12 and 39 COM 7A.36, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Taking into account Decision 40 COM 7A.22 on the World Heritage properties of the Syrian Arab Republic, adopted at its 40th session (Istanbul, 2016),
  4. Commends the State Party for taking emergency safeguarding measures to protect the property and for undertaking its detailed documentation;
  5. Reiterates that the State Party should continue to safeguard the Crac des Chevaliers through minimal first aid interventions, to prevent theft, further collapse and natural degradation, and refrain from undertaking conservation and reconstruction works until the situation allows, for the development of comprehensive conservation strategies and actions that respond to international standards in full consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to evaluate the state of conservation of the property and identify measures needed to reverse the decay and ensure the conservation and protection of the property, as soon as the security situation allows;
  7. Decides to retain the Crac des Chevaliers and Qal’at Salah El-Din (Syrian Arab Republic) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6635 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.21 Site of Palmyra (Syrian Arab Republic) (C 23) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.57, 38 COM 7A.12 and 39 COM 7A.36adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively;
  3. Taking into account Decision 40 COM 7A.22 on the World Heritage properties of the Syrian Arab Republic, adopted at its 40th session (Istanbul, 2016),
  4. Condemns the deliberate acts of destructions at the property and deplores the considerable damage to the attributes of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
  5. Acknowledges the documentation and damage assessment undertaken by the Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums (DGAM) at the site and at the museum, as well as the Rapid Assessment mission dispatched by UNESCO’s Director General;
  6. Notes with concern the pressures to act quickly to reverse the damage at the property and considers that before any restoration work is undertaken, the property will require detailed studies and extensive field work, and also discussions on defining optimal approaches as well as considerations that go beyond technical issues, including adequate conditions on the ground;
  7. Welcomes the commitment that the development of recovery plans for the property will be undertaken in close consultation with the international scientific community and underlines the need to ensure that there is also broad consultation amongst national stakeholders as well as close consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, and that adequate time is given for the completion of the overall process;
  8. Reiterates its view that meanwhile the State Party should safeguard Palmyra through minimal first-aid interventions, to prevent theft, further collapse and natural degradation;
  9. Calls on the international community to provide financial support for the emergency measures that are required at the property;
  10. Requests to the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to proceed to a comprehensive assessment of the state of conservation of the property and identify measures needed to reverse the decay and ensure the conservation and protection of the property, as soon as the security situation allows;
  11. Decides to retain the Site of Palmyra (Syrian Arab Republic) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6636 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.22 General Decision on the World Heritage properties of the Syrian Arab Republic The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examinedDocument WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.57, 38 COM 7A.12 and 39 COM 7A.34adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Deplores the conflict situation prevailing in the country, the loss of human life and the degradation of humanitarian conditions;
  4. Takes note of the report provided by the State Party regarding the state of conservation of the six Syrian World Heritage properties and the updated reports on the damage assessment of Palmyra, and on the fire in the Ancient City of Damascus and expresses its utmost concern at the damage occurred and the threats facing these properties and cultural heritage in general;
  5. Urges all parties associated with the situation in Syria to refrain from any action that would cause further damage to cultural heritage of the country and to fulfil their obligations under international law by taking all possible measures to protect such heritage, including the halting of all damages that result from targeting World Heritage properties, sites included in the Tentative List and other cultural heritage sites, as well as the illegal re-use of archaeological material and inappropriate new construction;
  6. Also urges the State Party to adopt measures against World Heritage properties being used for military purposes;
  7. Further urges the State Party to safeguard damaged properties through minimal first aid interventions, to prevent theft, further collapse and natural degradation, and refrain from undertaking conservation and reconstruction work until the situation allows for the development of comprehensive conservation strategies and actions, in full consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
  8. Launches an appeal to all Member States of UNESCO to cooperate in the fight against the illicit trafficking of cultural heritage coming from Syria as per the United Nations Security Council Resolution 2199 of February 2015;
  9. Reiterates its suggestion to the State Party to consider ratifying the Second Protocol (1999) of the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Heritage during times of Armed Conflict;
  10. Commends the Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums (DGAM), and all heritage professionals and local communities in Syria who are working on monitoring and protecting cultural heritage, for their sustained efforts amidst extremely difficult conditions and addresses its most sincere condolences to the families of the heritage professionals who lost their life;
  11. Requests the State Party to pursue the systematic documentation of all damage incurred by the World Heritage properties whenever conditions allow and to implement all possible risk mitigation measures, to inform the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the properties from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) and the identification of corrective measures for all six properties, which should be informed by the proposed second meeting for the Emergency Safeguarding of Syria’s Cultural Heritage, and the proposed joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission and be developed in consultation with the Advisory Bodies, as soon as the security situation allows;
  12. Calls upon the international community to further support the safeguarding of Syrian cultural heritage through earmarked funds;
  13. Also calls upon the international and national cultural heritage professionals to unite for the safeguarding of Syria’s cultural heritage, and pursue their ongoing initiatives in coordination with UNESCO;
  14. Takes note of the State Party’s invitation of a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to Syria to assess the state of conservation of the properties that would be accessible under the United Nations security rules, and elaborate, in consultation with the State Party, a prioritized action plan for their recovery;
  15. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, updated reports on the state of conservation of the properties and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6637 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.23 Historic Town of Zabid (Yemen) (C 611) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 38 COM 7A.13, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014) and 39 COM 7A.37 adopted at its 39th Session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Expresses its concern at the recent damage caused to the cultural heritage of Yemen as a result of escalating armed conflict, and that the Historic City of Zabid continues to be subject to significant threats from the ongoing lack of organisational support and material resources for physical conservation projects;
  4. Acknowledges the efforts of the General Organization for the Preservation of Historic Cities in Yemen (GOPHCY), other national entities, the local authorities, and the community of Zabid to protect and conserve the property despite the very difficult conditions in the city;
  5. Notes with regret that, owing to the security situation in Yemen, it has not been possible to progress with the draft ‘National Strategy for the Preservation of the Historic Cities, Sites and Monuments 2016 – 2020’ nor to prepare a complementary Action Plan and requests the State Party to ensure that the Action Plan, when prepared, should address the current situation and include provisions for conservation of damaged buildings, local community awareness, and should be submitted to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Welcomes the continuing support of the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) for Yemeni cultural heritage;
  7. Calls on the international community to provide financial support for the implementation of the Emergency Action Plan for the Safeguarding of Yemen’s cultural heritage, adopted at the UNESCO Expert meeting in July 2015;
  8. Also requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, once the security situation has improved, to assess current conditions at the property, to consider progress with the corrective measures and to advise on the proposed Action Plan;
  9. Reiterates its request to the State Party to provide to the World Heritage Centre with details of the buffer zone and other technical requirements as requested and to submit a minor boundary modification proposal by 1 February 2017, for review by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to retain Historic Town of Zabid (Yemen) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6638 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.24 Old City of Sana’a (Yemen) (C 385) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.59, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Expresses its great concern at the recent damage caused to the cultural heritage of Yemen as a result of escalating armed conflict, and that the Old City of Sana’a has incurred irreversible destruction and severe damage due to the armed conflict, and continues to be vulnerable owing to the deteriorating security situation, the ongoing social change and continuing lack of organisational support and resources for both heritage management initiatives and physical conservation projects;
  4. Commends the State Party for its commitment and involvement in damage assessment, documentation and first-aid interventions, and for its continuous communication with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, and encourages all concerned stakeholders to unite for the preservation of cultural heritage in Sana’a;
  5. Notes that the State Party has started the preparation of the reconstruction project for the seven destroyed buildings in al-Qasimi neighbourhood on an exceptional basis linked to the need of providing shelter for the inhabitants of Sana’a;
  6. Urges the State Party to pursue its dialogue with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in all restoration and/or reconstruction processes to ensure the safety of the inhabitants and the respect of international conservation standards;
  7. Calls on the international community to provide financial support for the implementation of the Emergency Action Plan for the Safeguarding of Yemen’s Cultural heritage, adopted at the UNESCO Expert meeting in July 2015, including funding for capacity building and first-aid restoration and protection measures, and also calls on the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to continue providing the State Party with technical assistance and support where needed;
  8. Also urges all parties associated with the situation in Yemen to refrain from any action that would cause further damage to cultural heritage of Sana’a and the country and to fulfil their obligations under international law by taking all possible measures to protect such heritage, in particular the safeguarding of World Heritage properties and the sites included in the Tentative List;
  9. Reiterates its request that the State Party:
    1. Maintain a moratorium on new development or new construction, pending completion of the proposed Conservation Plan and, where appropriate, project-specific heritage impact assessments,
    2. Prior to proceeding with the proposed rehabilitation of the water and sewerage project, prepare a HIA, which includes assessment of impacts on Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), in line with the relevant ICOMOS guidelines and submit a copy of the HIA to the World Heritage Centre prior to making any decisions that would be difficult to reverse, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  10. Also requests the State Party, as soon as it is feasible and in close consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, to develop a set of corrective measures and a timeframe for their implementation, as well as a Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  11. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to evaluate the state of conservation of the property and identify measures needed to reverse the decay and ensure the conservation and protection of the property, as soon as the security situation allows;
  12. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  13. Decides to retain Old City of Sana'a (Yemen) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6639 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.25 Old Walled City of Shibam (Yemen) (C 192) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 22 BUR V.B.72 and 39 COM 7B.60, adopted at the 22nd session of its Bureau (UNESCO, 1998) and at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015) respectively,
  3. Expresses its concern at the recent damage caused to the Old Walled City of Shibam as a result of armed conflict, and that the property continues to be subject to significant threats from natural elements, and a lack of organisational support and material resources for physical conservation projects;
  4. Acknowledges the efforts of the General Organization for the Preservation of Historic Cities in Yemen (GOPHCY), the local authorities, and the community of Shibam to protect and conserve the property despite the very difficult conditions in the city;
  5. Notes with regret that, owing to the security situation in Yemen, it has not been possible to prepare a management plan for the property, nor to progress on the draft ‘National Strategy for the Preservation of the Historic Cities, Sites and Monuments 2016 – 2020’ nor to prepare a complementary Action Plan and requests the State Party to ensure that both the management plan and the Action Plan, when prepared, should address the current situation and include provisions for conservation of damaged buildings, local community awareness, and should be submitted to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Also requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, once the security situation has improved, to assess current conditions at the property, to advise on short-term repair and conservation works and to contribute to the development of a set of corrective measures and a timeframe for their implementation, as well as the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  7. Welcomes the continuing support of the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) for Yemeni cultural heritage;
  8. Calls on the international community to provide financial support for the implementation of the Emergency Action Plan for the Safeguarding of Yemen’s cultural heritage, adopted at the UNESCO Expert meeting in July 2015;
  9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  10. Decides to retain the Old Walled City of Shibam (Yemen) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6640 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.26 Cultural Landscape and Archaeological Remains of the Bamiyan Valley (Afghanistan) (C 208 rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.39, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Notes with satisfaction that the Management Plan has been officially adopted and integrated into the Bamiyan City Master Plan, a tool which aims to control development pressures, but regrets that no updated report has been submitted on how these mechanisms work, especially in view of the strong development pressures observed recently;
  4. Urges the State Party to continue vigilantly implementing the Management Plan for the World Heritage property and the Bamiyan City Master plan, and to enforce building codes and regulations for development projects in the buffer zones of the property and other areas protected under the 2004 Afghan Law on the Protection of Historical and Cultural Properties;
  5. Requests the State Party to carry out a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) of the proposed Cultural Centre and Museum in Bamiyan, in line with the ICOMOS Guidance on HIAs for Cultural World Heritage Properties, after clearly defining the scope of this study with regard to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
  6. Expresses its concerns over the state of conservation of some of the property’s components which have been reported as being seriously deteriorated and in imminent danger of collapse, and calls upon the international community to provide technical and financial support not only to the Bamiyan Valley, but also to other components of this serial property, such as Shahri-Zohak, Kakrak and Shari Gholgholah, in order to help the State Party reach the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  7. Also notes the State Party’s wish to partially reconstruct at least one of the Buddha niches and that in the framework of the Japan Funds-in-Trust project an international symposium is to be organized at the end of the year to discuss possible reconstruction, and also requests the State Party to discuss the brief for this symposium with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in advance of the event;
  8. Further requests the State Party to submit the outcomes of the symposium and an agreed overall approach to reconstruction and conservation of  the property in relation to OUV, for review by the Advisory Bodies and consideration by the World Heritage Committee, before  any detailed technical and financial feasibility studies are undertaken for a specific reconstruction project;
  9. Also notes with satisfaction the progress accomplished by the State Party, in co-operation with the UNESCO Office in Kabul, in ensuring the site’s security, and welcomes the deployment to each of the components of the property of eight on-site guards who, in addition to the police officers deployed by the Ministry of Interior, have effectively stopped illicit traffic of cultural property and increased the site’s security;
  10. Also urges the State Party to review, in consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, the timeframe for the implementation of the corrective measures and to submit this revised timeframe to the World Heritage Centre, for examination by the Committee;
  11. Requests furthermore the State Party to elaborate and implement, with the support of international donors, a capacity-building programme to strengthen local and national capacities with regard to heritage conservation and management, including the development of the local communities’ capacity to contribute to the safeguarding the property;
  12. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  13. Decides to retain Cultural Landscape and Archaeological Remains of the Bamiyan Valley (Afghanistan) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6641 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.27 Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam (Afghanistan) (C 211 rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.38, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Deeply regrets that neither emergency measures nor conservation work have been undertaken in situ, and that no concrete report has been submitted providing precise and up-to-date information on the state of conservation of the property, including the security situation;
  4. Also regrets that the State Party has neither adopted the detailed topographic map of the property, produced in 2012, nor submitted a proposal for minor boundary modification at this point in time, and requests the State Party to adopt the 2012 topographic map of the property and to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a proposal for a minor boundary modification, in accordance with Paragraphs 163-165 of the Operational Guidelines, for review by ICOMOS;
  5. Strongly urges the State Party to establish, on the basis of the Conservation Action Plan elaborated as part of the Emergency International Assistance granted under the World Heritage Fund, a realistic and concrete emergency and conservation work plan, including measures for site security, and also requests that this plan be approved along with the necessary budget in order to commence its implementation as soon as possible;
  6. Calls upon the international community for technical and financial support, in co-operation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, for the implementation of abovementioned Action Plan, which will be part of a Strategy to implement the corrective measures identified by the World Heritage Committee at its 31st session (Christchurch, 2007);
  7. Further requests the State Party, upon development of the Conservation Strategy and Action Plan and in consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, to revise the timeframe for the implementation of the corrective measures and to submit it to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017;
  8. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  9. Decides to retain Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam (Afghanistan) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6642 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.28 Bagrati Cathedral and Gelati Monastery (Georgia) (C 710) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decisions 39 COM 7A.40 and 39 COM 8B.35, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the progress made by the State Party in the implementation of the corrective measures concerning the Gelati Monastery, one of the components of the property;
  4. Notes the information provided by the State Party inter alia in response to Decision 39 COM 8B.95, regarding the significant boundary modification of the property, and in particular:
    1. The clarified Management procedures and responsibilities of the various agencies and organisations involved,
    2. The details on putting measures in place by the major stakeholders, including the development of the draft of the Code on Cultural Heritage, to ensure adequate protection and management of the property,
    3. The Revised Draft Management Plan, submitted, and subsequently reviewed by ICOMOS,
    4. The legally adopted extended buffer zone of Gelati Monastery,
    5. The secured adequate resources for long-term programmes of restoration for the fabric of the monastery and its mural paintings,
    6. The developed system of documentation for conservation and restoration work,
    7. Details on the construction of the visitor centre outside the Gelati Monastery linked to a visitor management strategy, which started in 2015 in conformity with the June 2013 ICOMOS review recommendations;
  5. Urges the State Party to formally resubmit the significant boundary modification of the property to the World Heritage Centre by 1 February 2017, in conformity with Paragraph 159 of the Operational Guidelines, for examination at its 41st session in 2017;
  6. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 Febuary 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  7. Decides to retain Bagrati Cathedral and Gelati Monastery (Georgia) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6643 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.29 Historical Monuments of Mtskheta (Georgia) (C 708) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.41, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the important work and commitment by the State Party to ensure that the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) forms the core of the development of the Urban Land-Use Master Plan (ULUMP);
  4. Notes the measures taken by the authorities to guarantee protection to the property through the Decree on the Moratorium on Urban Development and Land Privatization as well as a revised ULUMP which has yet to be finalized and implemented in accordance with World Heritage Centre and ICOMOS recommendations;
  5. Decides to remove the Historical Monuments of Mtskheta (Georgia) from the List of World Heritage in Danger;
  6. Recommends that the State Party take into consideration the recommendations provided by the 2015 and 2016 World Heritage Centre technical assistance missions, and by ICOMOS, notably to:
    1. Strengthen the strategic spatial planning vision and ensure that the urban dimension of the property be fully reflected in the policies, measures and tools adopted to ensure the conservation of the latter, using if necessary the approach carried by the Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (2011),
    2. Address the governance issue at the local level in order to ensure adequate planning, efficient management and decision making,
    3. Pursue a stakeholder involvement strategy and methodology, together with communication tools,
    4. Review the administrative borders especially in relation to the Jvari site,
      in order to finalize and implement the ULUMP including supportive land use regulations, and a management plan, and also continue to ensure the long term conservation of monuments and archaeological sites through the development of adequate plans and restoration programmes;
  7. Welcomes the establishment of a unified buffer zone, encompassing the landscape surrounding the components, including in particular the panorama along the rivers and the mountain setting and requests the State Party to provide this enlarged buffer zone with appropriate protection, and to submit a minor boundary modification proposal of the unified buffer zone of the property to the World Heritage Centre;
  8. Also welcomes the initiative of the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations;
  9. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6644 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.30 Medieval Monuments in Kosovo (Serbia) (C 724 bis) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Decides to adjourn the debate on this agenda item until its next ordinary session.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6645 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.31 Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) (C 1150) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.43, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015) as well as Decisions 36 COM 7B.93 (Saint Petersburg, 2012), 37 COM 7A.35 (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38 COM 7A.19 (Doha, 2014),
  3. Notes that all stakeholders recognize the serious concerns of the World Heritage Committee over the potential threat of the Liverpool Waters development scheme to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
  4. Recalls the conclusions of the 2015 joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Advisory mission, in particular the need to reduce the urban density and height of the proposed development from the height maximums granted for the Liverpool Waters project, and also notes the need for a global approach, linking the strategic development vision to a regulatory planning document, which provides clear legal guidelines to protect the OUV of the property, and in turn helps developers design their projects accordingly;
  5. Although noting that the State Party proposes to develop the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) and the Liverpool Local Plan and Master Plan in tandem, and that they will not be approved before 2018, recalls however that the DSOCR is a tool and framework document which defines the state of conservation that a property must reach in order to demonstrate that it is no longer threatened by ascertained or potential serious and specific danger and to enable its removal from the List of World Heritage in Danger (the submission of the final draft of the DSOCR by the State Party and its approval by the Committee should come prior to the finalization and approval of the necessary planning tools and regulatory framework), and reiterates its request to the State Party to submit the final draft of the DSOCR to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2016, for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies as requested in Decision 39 COM 7A.43, and to include the approval of the Local Plan and the revised Management plan as part of the agreed implementation plan for the corrective measures;
  6. Further notes the confirmation from the State Party that a moratorium remains in place for the Liverpool Central Docks, but requests the State Party to ensure that only repair and reuse of historic buildings, maintenance works and small scale projects should receive permission within the rest of the property until the DSOCR is finalized and adopted;
  7. Notes furthermore the submission by the State Party on 8 July 2016 of new information about two projects: Princes Reach, Princes Dock, Liverpool and Proposed Student Residences in Skelhorne Street, Liverpool and also requests the State Party to ensure that neither project receives project approval, until the DSOCR has been finalized and adopted;
  8. Further requests the State Party to submit the draft Local Plan and Master Plan to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, before either document is considered for adoption by either Liverpool City Council or the State Party, and to submit the final Local Plan and Master Plan to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2018;
  9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 February 2017, a progress report on the elaboration of the Liverpool Local Plan, for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, it being understood that no new detailed plans affecting the property will be approved by either Liverpool City Council or the State Party before the DSOCR is officially adopted by the Committee;
  10. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to retain Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) on the List of World Heritage in Danger, with the possibility of deletion of the property from the World Heritage List in the absence of timely implementation of the above recommendations.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6646 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.32 Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System (Belize) (N 764) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.18, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcoming the efforts undertaken by the State Party towards the implementation of the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), including the announcement of a ban on offshore petroleum exploration within all seven components of the property and within one kilometre on either side of the Barrier Reef, notes that this policy announcement still needs to be translated into a legislative instrument and that the adequacy of the one-kilometre buffer zone needs revision to secure the protection of the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) and the full implementation of the indicator under the DSOCR;
  4. Also notes that the Petroleum Exploration Framework is currently being revised and that this document will define further areas that would be excluded from offshore petroleum exploration, as well as other restrictions, and requests the State Party to ensure that the protection of the property’s OUV is fully integrated into the revision of the Framework in line with the requirements under the DSOCR;
  5. Also welcomes the adoption of the Integrated Coastal Zone Management Plan (ICZMP) and the provision of funding for its initial implementation and strongly encourages the State Party to ensure that the resources required for the long term implementation of the Plan are secured;
  6. Takes note of the confirmation made by the State Party that a voluntary moratorium on sale and lease of lands within the property remains in place and reiterates its request to the State Party to develop a legally binding instrument to ensure a permanent cessation of all sales and leases of state owned land throughout the property;
  7. Urges the State Party to finalize and adopt the Mangrove Regulations in order to ensure that the mangrove areas within the property are effectively protected and requirements under the DSOCR are fully met;
  8. Also strongly encourages the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Advisory mission to provide the necessary assistance in the elaboration of the abovementioned legislative instruments related to offshore petroleum exploration as well as the overall implementation of the indicators of the DSOCR;
  9. Further welcomes the revision of the Environmental Impact Assessment system and also urges the State Party to fully integrate the protection of the property’s OUV into this process to ensure that the revised regulations guarantee that no areas within the property and in its immediate vicinity can be developed in ways that would negatively impact on the property's OUV, consistent with the requirements under the DSOCR;
  10. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to retain Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System (Belize) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6647 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.33 Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve (Honduras) (N 196) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.20, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Commends the State Party and governmental and non-governmental partners for further progress made in integrated monitoring and granting negotiated local access to land and natural resources, and encourages the State Party and partners to continue these efforts;
  4. Expresses its concern that another eviction has been carried out and strongly urges the State Party to prevent new illegal settlements so as to avoid further evictions in the future;
  5. Reiterates its concern that illegal activities continue to impact on the property and that no apparent progress has been made in terms of human, financial and logistical resources beyond the securing of external funding and cooperation;
  6. Encourages the State Party to use the conclusions and recommendations of the discussions facilitated by International Assistance, as a foundation to develop a proposal for a significant boundary modification, with the technical support of the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, as required;
  7. Also recalls its consideration that the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) should be revised once the boundaries of the property have been clarified;
  8. Recalls its request to the State Party to report on the possible impacts of the Patuca III project;
  9. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  10. Decides to retain Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve (Honduras) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6648 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.34 Manovo Gounda St. Floris National Park (Central African Republic) (N 475)

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7A.34 and 39 COM 7A.1 adopted respectively at its 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions,
  3. Takes note of the Bangui National Forum relating to the restoration of peace and expresses the hope that the commitments undertaken as a result of this Forum will enable a progressive improvement of the security situation in the country, including in the zone where the property is located;
  4. However, notes with concern that insecurity continues to complicate the implementation of the corrective measures adopted by the Committee at its 33rd session (Seville, 2009);
  5. Reiterates its deep concern regarding the probable loss of most of the flagship species of large mammals in the property, due to poaching and impact from grazing cattle;
  6. Also reiterates its continuing concern regarding the fact that the property has already lost its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), which could result in its removal from the World Heritage List, in conformity with Paragraph 176d) of the Operational Guidelines;
  7. Warmly welcomes the commitment of the State Party to pursue the implementation of the ECOFAUNE + Project with the support of the European Union, as well as the land use and security activities foreseen in and around the property in the framework of the Central Africa Biodiversity Conservation Programme – Protecting Central Africa’s Elephants funded by the African Development Bank and encourages the State Party to continue its efforts;
  8. Reiterates its request to the State Party to organize a workshop to assess the feasibility for the restoration of the OUV of the property under the current security conditions and based on this, to prepare an emergency action plan, focused on the adopted corrective measures;
  9. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission as soon as the security situation permits to assess the state of conservation of the property and determine whether there remain perspectives for the regeneration of the characteristics of the property justifying its OUV, or if a removal of the property from the World Heritage List in accordance with Paragraph IV.C of the Operational Guidelines should be envisaged;
  10. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to continue to apply the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism for this property;
  12. Also decides to retain Manovo-Gounda St Floris National Park (Central African Republic) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6649 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.35 Comoé National Park (Côte d’Ivoire) (N 227)

The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.2, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Warmly welcomes the continued progress achieved by the State Party, in particular the surveillance measures and awareness raising activities among the local communities, to counteract human pressure affecting the property;
  4. Notes with concern continued gold prospecting and associated poaching, as well as other threats resulting from human pressure and requests the State Party to pursue its efforts to counteract these threats, to implement the corrective measures and continue the execution of the rehabilitation plan begun in 2015;
  5. Also warmly welcomes the willingness of the State Party to prepare Environmental Impact Evaluations (EIEs) for the two mining projects outside the Park should they progress beyond the prospection stage, and reiterates its request to the State Party to ensure that these EIEs include an evaluation of the potential impacts of these projects on the outstanding universal value (OUV) of the property, in conformity with the IUCN Advisory Note on World Heritage: environmental evaluation;
  6. Notes with satisfaction the preparation and the implementation of an ecological monitoring strategy prepared with support from GIZ (German Agency for International Cooperation) as well as the inventories of large mammals that have been carried out, also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, for examination by IUCN, all reports concerning the analysis of data gathered during these inventories to enable confirmation of the re-establishment of large wildlife populations within the Park, and also reiterates its request to the State Party to define, in consultation with the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, the biological indicators for the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  7. Further reiterates its request to the State Party to invite a joint UNESCO/IUCN reactive monitoring mission to the property as soon as the above-mentioned reports are available, to examine the state of conservation of the property and progress achieved in the implementation of the corrective measures;
  8. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the corrective measures and the above-mentioned points, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  9. Decides to retain Comoé National Park (Côte d'Ivoire) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6650 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.36 Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve (Côte d’Ivoire/Guinea) (N 155bis) The World Heritage Committee,
  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.3, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Notes the efforts made by the State Party of Côte d'Ivoire to strengthen the monitoring and update the property boundaries with the participation of the local communities but requests the State Party of Côte d'Ivoire to provide details of the decree for the redefinition of the boundaries;
  4. Also notes the progress made by the State Party of Guinea in the implementation of the international assistance project for the protection of the biodiversity of the property by an integrated and participatory management, financed by the World Heritage Fund, encourages the State Party of Guinea to continue and strengthen the actions being carried out, but regrets that the report provided does not give information about several measures requested by the Committee;
  5. Further notes that the implementation of corrective measures continued to be affected by the health crisis caused by the Ebola epidemic, and considers however that the normalization of the health situation in the region should enable the States Parties to resume their efforts to implement the corrective measures;
  6. Reiterates its requests to both States Parties to implement a joint monitoring system of the property to control all anthropogenic pressures, and to partner with UNDP and the Global Environment Facility (GEF) to develop the second phase of the Nimba Project, to concern the entire property, in order to promote the implementation of the corrective measures to safeguard the integrity of the property;
  7. Also requests the State Party of Guinea to strictly ensure the preparation of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) of the West Africa Exploration Company in accordance with international standards as requested in Decision 37 COM 7A.3 (Phnom Penh, 2013), and to submit this ESIA to the World Heritage Centre for review by IUCN, before authorizing the project;
  8. Also reiterates its request to the State Party of Guinea to develop a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), in line with international standards, to qualify and quantity all the potential cumulative impacts of various mining projects planned on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, as recommended by the 2013 monitoring mission for the property and the IUCN World Heritage advice note on Environmental Assessment, and submit the results to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN, before any decision on these projects, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  9. Further reiterates its request to the State Party of Guinea to revise the boundaries of the exploration permit granted to the SAMA Resources Company to ensure that there is no overlapping with the property;
  10. Further requests the States Parties of Côte d’Ivoire and Guinea to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a joint updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017 ;
  11. Decides to retain Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve (Côte d'Ivoire / Guinea) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6651 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.37 Garamba National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) (N 136) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.8, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Commends the efforts of the staff of the property who continue their actions for the conservation of the property, often at great risk, and expresses its most sincere condolences to the families of the guards and soldiers killed in operations for the protection of the property;
  4. Expresses its deepest concern over continuing insecurity around the property and ongoing poaching pressure, particularly targeted at elephants and driven by international ivory trafficking;
  5. Reiterates its great concern that the northern white rhino is now considered to be extinct in the property and in the wild, that populations of elephants and other key species have continued to decline and Congolese giraffe are now reaching critically low numbers, and as a result the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property could be lost if urgent action to reverse the downward population trends is not taken;
  6. Also commends the State Party, particularly the Congolese Nature Conservation Institute (ICCN) and its partner, African Parks Network for their continuous efforts to further strengthen law enforcement operations by extending aerial and ground surveillance to cover the entire property as well as adjacent Hunting Areas that serve as important buffer zones for the property;
  7. Requests the State Party to continue its efforts to implement the corrective measures, updated by the 2016 mission, as follows:
    1. Further strengthen anti-poaching efforts through continued close collaboration with the Congolese armed forces (FARDC) and development of highly skilled, motivated and properly equipped field personnel,
    2. Further enhance trans-boundary cooperation with South Sudan, particularly in relation to the management of adjacent Lantoto National Park, and efforts to curb poaching and illegal cross-border trade in wildlife products,
    3. Complete the establishment and deployment of a team of at least 200 operational guards incorporating carefully selected elements from FARDC,
    4. Maintain an effective year-round surveillance of the entire park and at least 50% of the surrounding Hunting Areas, increasing the extent and frequency of ground patrols whilst maintaining the existing levels of aerial surveillance,
    5. Establish a conservation strategy for the Hunting Areas and develop a recognized Buffer Zone for the World Heritage property which serves to strengthen the protection of the property’s OUV,
    6. Support and strengthen economic development activities for communities around the property to promote sustainable livelihoods, reduce dependence on park resources and ensure that neighbouring communities understand and support conservation efforts,
    7. Maintain close surveillance of the few remaining Congo giraffe and establish appropriate measures to ensure their protection,
    8. Further develop the park’s infrastructure, extending the road network, and installing additional radio repeater stations, observation posts and other installations to facilitate efficient and effective protection and management of the entire property, especially the northern sectors,
    9. Work towards sustainable financing of park management, identifying and developing a range of income sources, including trust funds, business and tourism opportunities;
  8. Takes notes of the revision proposed by the 2016 mission of the indicators of the draft Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), and also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, the final version of the DSOCR for adoption by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  9. Also takes note of the ongoing consultation carried out by UNESCO in view of convening a meeting on the security in the region, and reiterates its invitation to the Director-General of UNESCO to organize, in cooperation with United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO), a high-level meeting between the Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda and South Sudan, as well as Central African Republic and other potential stakeholders on how to improve security in the region and address the poaching issue;
  10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to continue to apply the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism to the property;
  12. Also decides to retain Garamba National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6652 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.38 Kahuzi-Biega National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) (N 137) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.5, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Expresses its sincere condolences to the family of the guard killed during the execution of operations carried out for the protection of the property;
  4. Welcomes the continued efforts by the Congolese Institute for Conservation of Nature (ICCN) with assistance from the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo (FARDC) in securing the property, strengthening surveillance and closing illegal mines but expresses its concern that surveillance coverage area decreased to 34% of the property in 2015 due to the late release of funds;
  5. Expresses its utmost concern about the conclusions presented in the 2016 WCS/FFI/ICCN (Wildlife Conservation International/Fauna and Flora International/ICCN) report on the status of Grauer’s gorilla and eastern chimpanzee, which demonstrate that population of Grauer’s gorilla is estimated to have declined by 77% across its range and by 87% in the lowland sectors of the property, making it now critically endangered, and emphasizes the crucial importance of increasing efforts to protect Grauer’s gorilla in the property to safeguard its continued survival;
  6. Also notes with significant concern that mining and the associated bushmeat hunting are identified in the WCS/FFI/ICCN report as the most critical threat to Grauer’s gorilla and eastern chimpanzee across their range, including in the property;
  7. Strongly urges the State Party to close fully all remaining mines in the property as a matter of utmost priority and ensure that they are not re-occupied and to take stronger measures to stop the consumption and trade of bushmeat, and ensure a focus on stopping the illegal trade of great apes;
  8. Takes note of the State Party’s confirmation that no mining concessions are active within the property and requests the State Party to confirm that all exploratory mining concessions given by the Mining Cadastre have been cancelled;
  9. Further notes that the “National Forum on Governance and Enhancement of the Property” reportedly resulted in the stabilization of destructive activities linked to illegal farms in the ecological corridor between the lowland and highland sectors of the property and that some recovery of vegetation has been observed in the areas where encroachment was previously addressed, and also requests the State Party to accelerate the actions to prevent damage to and encroachment of the ecological corridor, which is crucial to ensure the ecological continuity between the highland and lowland sectors of the property, and to submit more details on the status of the corridor with maps showing areas where encroachment has been removed, and which are regenerating, and which areas are still encroached;
  10. Reiterates its request to the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission as soon as the final results of the inventory are available, to assess the state of conservation of the property, update the corrective measures, and establish a timeframe for their implementation as well as the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  11. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to continue to apply the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism for the property;
  13. Also decides to retain Kahuzi-Biega National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6653 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.39 Okapi Wildlife Reserve (Democratic Republic of the Congo) (N 718) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.41, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Expresses its most sincere condolences to the family of the guard killed in operations for the protection of the property;
  4. Welcomes the cancellation of one of the mining permits awarded to KiloGold Society inside the property and urges the State Party to provide information on the remaining mining permits overlapping with the property and to ensure their cancellation;
  5. Takes note of the actions taken by the Congolese Institute for Conservation of Nature (ICCN) and Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (FARDC) to close some artisanal mines and reiterates its request to the State Party to evacuate and close all illegal artisanal mines within the property;
  6. Expresses its concern at the continued deterioration of the security situation in the property, increased poaching and the reopening of artisanal mining sites encouraged by rebel groups;
  7. Notes with appreciation the development of a roadmap towards the signing of an agreement between ICCN and the four communities in the Mambasa Territory in order to establish an integral conservation zone in the property, and the steps taken to inform the zoning plan for forest areas adjacent to the property;
  8. Acknowledges the addition of 50 trained guards for the ongoing surveillance of the property, but notes with concern that the reported surveillance coverage is significantly lower than what was reported to the Committee at its 39th session and therefore, also reiterates its request to the State Party to prioritize efforts to further expand the patrol coverage and regain control of the site to halt poaching and the deterioration of the Outstanding Universal Value of the property, including through the recruitment of additional guards and the adequate provision of financial and material resources;
  9. Also notes with concern the significant increase in the number of inhabitants in the five villages along the RN4 which questions the effectiveness of the system established to control immigration into the property, and requests the State Party to evaluate and improve this system in order to make it more effective, and to evaluate the impacts of the increased population on land use around the villages;
  10. Also urges the State Party to continue its efforts to implement the corrective measures and to resume operations suspended due to a lack of security, and reiterates its call upon donors to provide necessary financial and technical support for these efforts;
  11. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the corrective measures, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to continue to apply the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism for the property;
  13. Also decides to retain the Okapi Wildlife Reserve (Democratic Republic of the Congo) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6654 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.40 Salonga National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) (N 280) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.7, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the State Party’s ongoing efforts, to implement the corrective measures, with the substantial financial and technical support from various partners, but notes the importance of sustaining this financial support over a longer timeframe in order to adequately manage the property and increase operational capacity and restore its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
  4. Also welcomes the increased patrols of the property by park staff covering 50% of the area, and the use of the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART) approach for data collection;
  5. Appreciates the establishment of the design of the ecological corridor through consultation with local communities to link the two components of the property, including the identification of six multiple use zones, requests the State Party to inform the World Heritage Centre on the implementation of the management plans, and urges it to consider further options to improve connectivity between the “sustainable conservation zones” and the southern component of the property;
  6. Notes with concern that disputes over land are continuing within the property, concerning in particular the Kitawala and Yaelima communities, and also requests the State Party to establish an effective dialogue with these communities to identify a possible way forward, in compliance with the corrective measures adopted by the Committee at its 36th session (Saint-Petersburg, 2012);
  7. Also notes that the inventory of flagship species has been conducted in two of the sectors within the property and further requests the State Party to submit the full findings of the inventories for all flagship species assessed to the World Heritage Centre, as soon as they become available and, based on the results, to also submit an updated Desired state of conservation for the removal of a property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) which quantifies the indicators, for examination by the World Heritage Committee;
  8. Deeply regrets that the State Party has still not provided any information on the status of oil exploration and exploitation projects (Decisions 36 COM 7A.7, 37 COM 7A.7, 38 COM 7A.40, 39 COM 7A.7), and strongly urges the State Party to submit this information as a matter of urgency, and reiterates its position that oil and gas exploration or exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the commitments made by industry leaders such as Shell and Total not to undertake such activities within World Heritage properties;
  9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  10. Decides to continue to apply the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism to the property;
  11. Also decides to retain the Salonga National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6655 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.41 Virunga National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) (N 63) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decisions 39 COM 7A.4 and 39 COM 7A.9, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Addresses its most sincere condolences to the families of the guards and the military killed during operations for the protection of the property;
  4. Regrets that the State Party has not confirmed its commitment not to authorize new petroleum exploration and exploitation within the boundaries of the property, as was established at the time of inscription on the World Heritage List in 1979, and reiterates its request to the State Party to cancel the petroleum concessions granted inside the property;
  5. Reiterates its position that oil and gas exploration or exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the commitments made by industry leaders such as Shell and Total not to undertake such activities within World Heritage properties;
  6. Expresses its utmost concern as regards the decision of the State Party of Uganda to include the Ngaji block in the calls for tender for the future petroleum exploration projects, this block being located in the Ugandan part of Lake Edward bordering the property, and recalls its obligations contained in Article 6.3 of the Convention, stating that “Each State Party to this Convention undertakes not to take any deliberate measures which might damage directly or indirectly the cultural and natural heritage referred to in Articles 1 and 2 situated on the territory of other States Parties to this Convention”;
  7. Recalling that the importance of Lake Edward is mentioned several times in the Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, considers that any activity linked to petroleum on Lake Edward is highly likely to damage the OUV of the property as well as its integrity, including by negative impacts on the transboundary waters; and urgently requests the State Party of Uganda to refrain from granting petroleum exploration permits for the Ngaji block;
  8. Also requests the State Party of Uganda to submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN, the report of the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) that was undertaken for oil and gas operations in the Albertine Graben;
  9. Encourges the States Parties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda and Rwanda to strengthen their cooperation around the “Grand Virunga” complex, including Lake Edward, and eventually consider the preparation of a new proposal for inscription for a transboundary extension of the property to reinforce its values and integrity;
  10. Also urges the States Parties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda to firmly commit not to authorize any petroleum exploration or exploitation at Lake Edward;
  11. Notes with satisfaction the progress accomplished by the State Party regarding the combat against encroachment, as well as the encouraging results of the ecological monitoring showing an increase in the mountain gorilla population accustomed to humans, a beginning of restoration of the hippopotamus population and a stabilisation of elephant poaching;
  12. Notes with concern the invader coalitions and the launching of simultaneous actions of village extensions into the Park, also reiterates its request to the State Party to implement the commitments undertaken in the Kinshasa Declaration of January 2011, in particular the peaceful evacuation of illegal occupants in the properties;
  13. Congratulates the “Virunga Alliance” initiative for its work towards the sustainable economic development of the property through the enhancement of the ecosystemic services of the park, and welcomes the support provided to local populations and to the provincial and national authorities and thanks the financial donors and the private sector for their support in the implementation of this programme;
  14. Endorses the State Party’s initiative to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Advisory mission to ascertain the progress and efforts made in the management of the property;
  15. Further equests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the corrective measures and the above points, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  16. Decides to continue to apply the Reinforced Monitoring Mechanism;
  17. Also decides to retain Virunga National Park (Democratic Republic of the Congo) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6656 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.42 General Decision on the properties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/7A and WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.9, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015) and reiterating the need to implement the Kinshasa Declaration adopted in 2011,
  3. Addresses its most sincere condolences to the families of the guards and soldiers killed during operations to protect the properties, and expresses its deep concern about the persistent in secure situation in most of the properties in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC);
  4. Warmly welcomes the creation of the Corps established to strengthen security in the DRC National Parks (CorPPN) which demonstrates the commitment of the State Party to implement the Kinshasa Declaration, and requests the State Party to rapidly provide it with the human and financial resources to enable the deployment of troops in the sites;
  5. Commends the State Party for its efforts to secure sustainable funding, and warmly thanks the donors for their substantial support to the properties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  6. Notes with satisfaction United Nations Security Council Resolution 2277 of 30 March 2016 adopted during the renewal of the mandate of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO), which commits the DRC Government to continue its actions to preserve the protected natural areas and which allows MONUSCO to encourage the consolidation of an effective national civil structure that controls the main mining activities and manages in an equitable manner the extraction, transportation and trade of natural resources in the eastern DRC;
  7. Reiterates its utmost concern about the new Hydrocarbons Code which provides the possibility to declassify protected areas, including World Heritage properties, to conduct oil exploration and exploitation activities, and about the intention of the State Party to officially address the World Heritage Centre to request an Advisory Body mission to discuss the oil issue in the property;
  8. Reiterates with insistence its request to the State Party to ensure the maintenance of the protection status of World Heritage properties and to cancel any such concessions for oil exploration and mining exploration or exploitation encroaching on one of the five properties, and reiterates its position that oil and gas exploration or exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the commitments made by industry leaders such as Shell and Total not to undertake such activities within World Heritage properties ;
  9. Recalls that the modifications to the boundaries of World Heritage properties that are related to the extractive industries must follow the procedure for significant modifications of the boundaries in accordance with paragraph 165 of the Operational Guidelines, taking into account the potential impact of such projects on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
  10. Regrets that, despite several inter-ministerial meetings, no progress has been noted on the issue of mining concessions overlapping protected areas and urges the State Party to take the necessary steps to cancel all licenses granted for mining activities which encroach on the properties, in accordance with the law in force;
  11. Commends the progress made by the State Party to conduct complete inventories at several sites, also notes with significant concern the results of ecological inventories, notably of Kahuzi-Biega and Garamba National Parks, which show significant decline of flagship species of these properties, and also urges the State Party to continue these efforts to protect the properties, to implement corrective measures and combat heavy poaching of iconic species, which remains the major threat to the OUV of the properties of the Democratic Republic of the Congo;
  12. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a detailed report on the implementation of the Kinshasa Declaration, on the security situation in the properties, on the status of the mining exploration and exploitation concessions encroaching on the World Heritage properties, and on the Hydrocarbons Code, for examination by the Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6657 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.43 Simien National Park (Ethiopia) (N 9) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.10, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Takes note that the on-going voluntary relocation of the Gich community is nearing completion, and requests the State Party to ensure that the remaining compensations and housing contructions are fully completed, and the implementation of the strategies for alternative livelihoods are continued;
  4. Welcomes the funding provided by different donors to support the development of alternative livelihood opportunities for the people living in the immediate vicinity of the park, and calls on further donors to support these initiatives to ensure their sustainability in the long term;
  5. Notes with appreciation the completion of the grazing pressure reduction strategy through stakeholder engagement and the timely initiation of its implementation, and also requests the State Party to secure investments and keep the World Heritage Centre updated on progress with the strategy’s implementation;
  6. Notes that a recent study found an increase in Walia ibex and Ethiopian wolf populations, and encourages the State Party to apply for International Assistance to commission a more detailed independent study in line with Committee Decision 39 COM 7A.10;
  7. Also notes that a gate has been constructed at Sawrie to restrict and monitor road use and further requests the State Party to accelerate the delayed realignment of roads crossing the property to reduce the pressure on the existing road through the property and to submit a map with all existing and proposed roads;
  8. Requests furthermore the State Party to clarify the location of the proposed eco-lodge developments inside the park, and to ensure that the relevant Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) include a thorough assessment of the potential impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and to submit the report to the World Heritage Centre for review before any decisions are made, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  9. Reiterates its request to the State Party to submit a proposal for the modification of the property’s boundaries through the preparation of a new nomination, as per Decision 35 COM 7A.9, in order to harmonize the boundaries of the property with the new boundaries of the national park;
  10. Requests moreover the State Party to invite an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, in order to assess progress in the implementation of the corrective measures and towards meeting the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  11. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to retain Simien National Park (Ethiopia) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6658 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.44 Rainforests of the Atsinanana (Madagascar) (N 1257) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.11, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Commends the State Party for the evident political will to halt the illicit trafficing of precious wood with the Act N°2015-056 creating a special tribunal to injudicate the traffickers and reinforce the penalties;
  4. Welcomes the progress achieved by the State Party towards attaining the indicators of the Desired state of conservation for removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), but considers that all the indicators have not yet been achieved;
  5. Also welcomes the efforts made by the State Party to ensure the involvement of the local communities in the conservation activities of the property, as demonstrated by the surveillance of the property by the Local Park Committees;
  6. Notes with concern that even although the volume appears to be diminished, the exploitation of rosewood in the property continues and that the quantity of illegally exploited rosewood still remains to be clarified, and urges the State Party to fully implement the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) action plan;
  7. Requests the State Party to prepare and implement a plan to acquire sufficient resources to ensure the long-term implementation of the strategy to seize the illegal stocks of precious wood;
  8. Also requests the State Party to clarify the nature and destination of the products to be delivered by the proposed treatment factory to evaluate the impact on the future demand of precious wood and consequently the potential impact on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
  9. Also notes with concern the artisanal and illegal mining, notably in the Zahamena and Ranomafana National Parks, as well as poaching of lemurs in several components of the property, including the Marojejy, Zahamena and Andringitra National Parks, also constituting serious threats to the OUV and the integrity of the property;
  10. Further requests the State Party to implement all the other recommendations of the 2015 mission;
  11. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and on the implementation of the corrective measures, as well as the above points, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  12. Decides to retain Rainforests of the Atsinanana (Madagascar) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6659 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.45 Aïr and Ténéré Natural Reserves (Niger) (N 573) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.12 adopted during its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Warmly welcomes the confirmation of GEF funding enabling the implementation of the third phase of the project for Co-Management for the Natural Resources of the Air and Ténéré (COGERAT), expected to start in 2016;
  4. Also warmly welcomes the efforts undertaken by the State Party in the implementation of the corrective measures, but considers that important efforts are still necessary to implement them all;
  5. Reiterates its concern with regard to the lack of human and logistical means to ensure the sovereign function of the Management, Surveillance and Ecological Monitoring Unit of the property and requests the State Party to accelerate the recruitment of forestry agents, and ensure adequate funding of the Management Unit to better control the exploitation of the natural resources within the property;
  6. Notes with concern the continuing problem of gold panning in the region of Agadez, close to the property, as well as the illegal circulation of weapons of war leading to an increase in poaching threats and timber harvesting;
  7. Also requests the State Party to provide detailed information and data on poaching and timber harvesting in the perimeter of the property, as well as the actions carried out to combat these threats;
  8. Notes with satisfaction the encouraging results obtained during the ecological monitoring mission of December 2015, but also considers that the efforts undertaken are not sufficient to obtain a satisfactory level of information to evaluate the status of these species throughout the property and reiterates its request to the State Party to implement all the recommendations of the 2015 IUCN reactive monitoring mission, in particular those concerning the preparation and implementation of a five-year programme to monitor the state of conservation of the dorcas gazelle, the dama gazelle and their habitats, as well as an action plan on the corrective measures defined in consultation with the State Party during the mission;
  9. Again urgently requests the State Party to carry out the necessary studies with a view to preparing a Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), for examination by the Committee at its 42nd session in 2018;
  10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the corrective measures and the above points, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to retain Air and Ténéré Natural Reserves (Niger) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6660 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.46 Niokolo-Koba National Park (Senegal) (N 153) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add.2,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.13, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Warmly welcomes the efforts undertaken by the State Party in the implementation of the corrective measures, but considers that further efforts should be made to implement all the corrective measures updated at its 39th session;
  4. Also warmly welcomes the efforts undertaken with the realization of the environmental and social impact study (ESIS) of the gold prospection project at Mako, and takes note of the mitigation measures proposed for the identified negative impacts of the project;
  5. Notes with concern that the ESIS of the Mako project indicates that indirect impacts of moderate importance are expected, which may exacerbate existing issues such as poaching, illegal gold prospection and the fragmentation of habitat, and that the loss of the chimpanzee habitat outside the property will be permanent, for which no mitigation measures have yet been identified;
  6. Requests the State Party to provide information on the current status of the Mako gold prospection project;
  7. Also considers that the loss of chimpanzee habitat in the areas adjacent to the boundaries of the property represents a direct impact on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, particularly with regard to conditions of integrity and would therefore risk further degradation of the recovering but fragile OUV;
  8. Noting the conclusions of the ESIS regarding the impacts of the Mako gold prospection project on the OUV of the property, in particular the permanent loss of chimpanzee habitat in areas near the boundaries of the property, also requests the State Party not to grant approval to the project in its current conception, in conformity with its Decision 39 COM 7A.13, which requests the prohibition of any extractive activity outside of the property insofar as such an activity could have a negative impact on the OUV of the property, including its conditions of integrity;
  9. Strongly urges the State Party to ensure that the ESIS is revised to take into account the above concerns, in order to identify an alternative design and location for the Mako project that will not have an impact on the OUV of the property;
  10. Also urges the State Party to ensure the permanent closure of the Mansadala basalt quarry by 2018, in accordance with the request of the Committee in its Decision 39 COM 7A.13;
  11. Expresses its deep concern as regards the potential impacts of the Sambangalou dam project on the OUV of the property, in particular the reduction of the areas of forest galleries and Ronier Palm stands in the property, river fording by large wildlife and insufficient water supply to the flood basins and ponds in the property, especially with regard to the continuing drying up of the ponds, and reiterates its request to the State Party to submit a specific study of the impacts of the Sambangalou dam project on the OUV of the property, in accordance with the “IUCN Advisory Note on World Heritage: an environmental assessment” prior to any decision on its construction, in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  12. Further requests the State Party to urgently update and implement the management plan for the property, integrating the updated and detailed ecological monitoring programme, to enable monitoring of the indicators for the Desired state of conservation for removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), and requests furthermore the State Party to provide an electronic version and three printed copies of the revised management plan to the World Heritage Centre and IUCN;
  13. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  14. Decides to retain Niokolo-Koba National Park (Senegal) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6661 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.47 Selous Game Reserve (United Republic of Tanzania) (N 199bis) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decisions 36 COM 8B.43, 37 COM 7B.7, 38 COM 7B.95, and 39 COM 7A.14, adopted at its 36th (Saint Petersburg, 2012), 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Commends the State Party and its international partners for their efforts in addressing the poaching crisis and encourages all involved to consolidate and coordinate these efforts;
  4. Acknowledges the progress made by the State Party to establish the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), noting that further studies are ongoing to address gaps in elephant population data and to enable the establishment of a proposed timeframe for its implementation;
  5. Requests the State Party to undertake an analysis of the current situation of black rhinoceros to estimate the number of rhino left in the property, to inform the response required to secure this population, and to revise the DSOCR accordingly, and also requests the State Party to submit, by 1 December 2017 an updated proposal for the DSOCR, for adoption by the Committee at its 42nd session in 2018;
  6. Urges again the State Party to develop and implement a comprehensive Emergency Action Plan with the objective of halting poaching within the Larger Selous Ecosystem within 12 months, as originally recommended by the 2013 mission;
  7. Welcomes the establishment of the Tanzania Wildlife Authority (TAWA) and its inauguration in October 2015, and also urges the State Party to ensure its timely and effective operationalization, as well as adequate and reliable resourcing;
  8. Also commends the States Parties of Tanzania, Mozambique and China for the formalization of agreements on the transboundary Niassa-Selous Ecosystem and on wildlife crime prevention, respectively, and strongly encourages all involved States Parties to report to the World Heritage Centre on the activities carried out in the framework of these agreements;
  9. Reiterates its utmost concern about:
    1. the ongoing lack of clarity in terms of the extraction method, water monitoring and disaster preparedness as regards the Mkuju River Project (MRP),
    2. the ongoing Stiegler’s Gorge dam project despite a high likelihood of serious and irreversible damage to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property,
    3. the lack of submission of a complete Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) on the Kidunda dam project, which seems to have been extended in its scope and therefore could have a higher impact on the integrity of the property,
    4. the legal possibility of mineral exploration and exploitation in the property and the overlapping mining and prospecting licenses, despite the commitment made by the State Party to not engage in any mining activity within the property, in line with the established position of the Committee that mining and oil and gas exploration and exploitation are incompatible with World Heritage status,
    5. the lack of reported progress in creating opportunities for local communities to participate in decision-making and benefit-sharing, including in Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs);
  10. Reiterates its request to the State Party to undertake a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) to comprehensively identify the cumulative impacts of mining, the potential Stiegler’s Gorge and planned Kidunda dam projects, agriculture and associated infrastructure, such as road building, both within the property as well as in important wildlife corridors and dispersal areas that are critical for maintaining the OUV of the property, and further urges the State Party to abandon any plans for the different development projects which are incompatible with the World Heritage status of the property;
  11. Also requests the State Party to invite an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, in order to evaluate progress in combating poaching, and to assess the current status and likely impacts of the proposed In Situ Leaching at the Mkuju River Uranium Mine, the Stiegler’s Gorge and Kidunda dam projects, and prospecting licenses overlapping with and adjacent to the property, as well as any other development that might impact the OUV of the property;
  12. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property, on the implementation of the above and on the 2013 mission recommendations, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  13. Decides to retain Selous Game Reserve (United Republic of Tanzania) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6662 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.48 Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (Indonesia) (N 1167) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.15, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Commends the State Party for its commitment to secure the Leuser Ecosystem by putting in place a moratorium on palm oil and mining, as well as a temporary suspension of all land clearing operations by palm oil and mining companies in the Leuser Ecosystem while a review of their licenses is being conducted, which will consider key wildlife habitats among other aspects;
  4. Considers that the designation of buffer zones should include key areas for wildlife in the Leuser Ecosystem as well as ecological corridors connecting these areas with the property to ensure these are legally protected, and encourages the State Party to seek the advice of the World Heritage Centre and IUCN to identify the areas in the Leuser Ecosystem that are crucially important to ensure the integrity of the property;
  5. Welcomes the State Party’s commitment to avoid any new road developments in the property and the confirmation that no mining licenses overlap with the property, and that illegal traditional mining sites in Kerinci Seblat National Park have been closed and are in the process of being rehabilitated;
  6. Urges the State Party to ensure that the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the geothermal development license adjacent to Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park includes a specific assessment of impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, in accordance with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and to submit a copy of the EIA to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN, prior to making a decision to approve the development;
  7. Requests the State Party to provide detailed population data of Sumatran tiger, elephant and rhino, as well as occupancy data for all three species and Sumatran orangutan, including clarification of methodologies used for their statistical analyses, in order to enable an assessment of progress achieved towards the targets defined in the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
  8. Also requests the State Party to provide details on the data collected through the application of the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART) in order to enable an assessment of the significance of forest crimes, illegal agricultural activities, and poaching/wildlife trade, and their impacts on the OUV of the property;
  9. Noting that the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the road network in the Bukit Barisan Mountain Range is expected to be available for public consultation by end 2016, reiterates its request to the State Party to submit the SEA, by 1 February 2017, to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN;
  10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  11. Decides to retain the Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (Indonesia) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6663 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.49 East Rennell (Solomon Islands) (N 854) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A.Add.2,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.16, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Regrets that the State Party did not submit a report on the state of conservation of the property, as requested by the Committee;
  4. Takes note that a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Advisory mission visited the property to meet the customary owners and to assist the State Party in the preparation of the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), but also regrets that the State Party did not submit a proposal for the DSOCR and requests the State Party to submit it by 1 February 2017, for adoption by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  5. Encourages the State Party to develop an Action Plan which would prioritize local communities and alternative income generating mechanisms that derive benefits from the conservation of the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
  6. Urges the State Party to expedite the completion and implementation of the revised Management Plan for the property and also requests the State Party to submit an electronic and three printed copies of the draft revised Management Plan to the World Heritage Centre for review by IUCN;
  7. Further requests the State Party to provide detailed information on all proposed bauxite mining projects on Rennell Island, including the Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) of each project, as well as an assessment of their potential cumulative impacts on the OUV of the property, in conformity with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment;
  8. Reiterates its requests to the State Party to:
    1. Defer consideration of bauxite mining license applications until the new management plan for the property has been approved and is being implemented,
    2. Put in place interim measures to mitigate the impact of existing logging operations and halt new logging operations until the new management plan has been approved and is being implemented,
    3. Undertake urgent action to halt the further spread of rats on Rennell Island and prevent them from entering the property, to put in place the biosecurity controls necessary to prevent further introductions of invasive species to the island;
  9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  10. Decides to retain East Rennell (Solomon Islands) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6664 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7A.50 Everglades National Park (United States of America) (N 76) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7A,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7A.17, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Recalls its request to the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
  4. Decides to retain Everglades National Park (United States of America) on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6665 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.1 Qhapaq Ñan, Andean Road System (Argentina / Bolivia (Plurinational State of) / Chile / Colombia / Ecuador / Peru) (C 1459) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.43, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Notes the establishment of the international mechanism to ensure political, technical and administrative coordination for the management framework of the property, including the designation of its first Pro Tempore Secretariat in Peru;
  4. Notes with appreciation the elaboration of the project “Support to the reinforcement of the participative management structure of the Qhapaq Ñan, Andean Road System”, in coordination with the World Heritage Centre, and financed by the UNESCO/Japan Funds-in-Trust (JFIT) to reinforce management capacities at national and local level;
  5. Acknowledges the progress made in the elaboration of Management and Conservation Plans for the property and requests the six States Parties to finalize these plans for all the remaining segments and to submit them to the World Heritage Centre for evaluation by the Advisory Bodies as soon as they are available;
  6. Urges the six States Parties to develop Risk Preparedness and Disaster Management strategies in earthquake-prone regions;
  7. Commends the six States Parties for the development of a navigable plan which enables the understanding of the integral significance of the cultural route and also encourages them to finalize the first proposal and submit it to the World Heritage Centre for evaluation by the Advisory Bodies, as soon as it is available;
  8. Also acknowledges the important progress made by the six States Parties in the redefinition of the boundaries of the buffer zones, particularly regarding the landscape features of the property, as requested by Decision 38 COM 8B.43, and further encourages them to continue this process;
  9. Recognizes the efforts made by the six States Parties to strengthen capacities for the understanding of the Heritage Impact Assessment process to be applied in the event of any significant project development to preserve the important landscape features around all Qhapaq Ñan road segments;
  10. Takes note of the submission of the ethnographic and oral record sheets, along with the ethnographic thematic maps developed during the nomination process and encourages furthermore the States Parties to develop a monitoring system of intangible heritage elements and the implications in terms of management of the property within the framework of the Japanese Funds In Trust project;
  11. Also requests the six States Parties to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated joint report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6666 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.2 Tiwanaku: Spiritual and Political Centre of the Tiwanaku Culture (Bolivia, Plurinational State of) (C 567rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.39, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Notes with satisfaction the efforts made by the State Party to strengthen the management structure of the property by reinforcing the multidisciplinary technical team Archaeological, Anthropological and Administrative Research Centre of Tiwanaku (CIAAAT);
  4. Acknowledges the progress made by the CIAAAT in updating the Management Plan and the development of the Integral Conservation Plan for Tiwanaku and urges the State Party to finalize this process within the framework of the UNESCO/Japan Funds-in-Trust (JFIT) project “Preservation and conservation of Tiwanaku and the Akapana Pyramid”, with the participation of all stakeholders;
  5. Requests the State Party to provide an electronic and three printed copies of the draft revised Management Plan and of the draft Integral Conservation Plan, by 1 February 2017, for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Also urges the State Party to clarify the legal status of the inscribed property and its surrounding areas in order to establish an extended buffer zone for the property and take the corresponding required regulatory measures to ensure the protection of its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) and conditions of authenticity and integrity;
  7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6667 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.3 Precolumbian Chiefdom Settlements with Stone Spheres of the Diquís (Costa Rica) (C 1453) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.44, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Commends the State Party for the progress made in responding to the Committee's recommendations;
  4. Recognizes the engagement of the State Party and the efforts undertaken to develop Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs) for both the Airport and El Diquís Hydroelectric Dam projects and notes that the preliminary analysis of the impacts highlights potential threats to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, suggesting the need for the reconsideration of both projects;
  5. Strongly recommends that these HIAs be completed as soon as possible and submitted to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Also strongly recommends that the State Party complete the Regulatory Plan for the buffer zones and that it submits the final draft to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies, along with the mentioned Manual of archaeological sites;
  7. Requests the State Party to provide updated information on the progress made in the acquisition of the 5.6ha land at El Silencio site;
  8. Also requests the State Party to provide updated information with regard to the request for additional staff made to the Ministry of Finance and details with regard to the new administrative structure and management unit being put in place;
  9. Recommends that the State Party continue with the undertaken actions in response to the Committee's recommendations, namely:
    1. preparing and finalizing the Risk Preparedness and Management Disaster Plans,
    2. establishing cooperation mechanisms with local communities and indigenous groups and associations for management purposes,
    3. promoting educational activities and projects to involve local teams for monitoring and documentation tasks and development of monitoring indicators;
  10. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6668 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.4 Colonial City of Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) (C 526) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.42, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. While recognizing that the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)-financed Tourism Development Project constitutes a great opportunity for the preservation of the property under the condition that it is executed according to national legislation and regulations and internationally accepted norms and standards, notes with regret and very serious concern that no adequate mechanisms have been established for the coordination and cooperation among the institutions responsible for the protection of the property (the National Directorate for Monumental Heritage (DNPM) and the Municipality of Santo Domingo) on the one hand, and the Tourism Development Project implemented by the Ministry of Tourism on the other hand;
  4. Recommends the State Party to address this issue as a matter of urgency and take the necessary measures to ensure that the DNPM has the technical, financial and institutional capacity to fulfill its legal obligations and that other institutions act according to established legal and institutional frameworks;
  5. Deploring the collapse of part of the XVIth century Hotel Frances, urges the State Party to clearly establish its causes and do the necessary to prevent that infrastructural works affect the heritage values of buildings and structures, and requests the State Party to report on the final results of the investigations and measures taken to prevent similar events in the future;
  6. Strongly recommends that the State Party review the objectives and parameters of the proposed convention centre in the ruins and gardens of the Convent of San Francisco, to undertake a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) and establish the carrying capacity of the Colonial City and its components in order to determine the convenience of such a convention centre and other major facilities in the historical centre;
  7. Commends the State Party for the progress made in the definition of a buffer zone east of the property and also requests it to submit the buffer zone as a minor boundary modification in accordance with paragraphs 163-164 of the Operational Guidelines as soon as possible;
  8. Welcomes that in the buffer zone on the east side of the property no constructions of the Sansouci project are foreseen and further requests that urban and architectural designs be submitted to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies as soon as they become available;
  9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6669 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.5 City of Quito (Ecuador) (C 2) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.43, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Commends the State Party for its commitment to implement the recommendations of the World Heritage Committee, the 2013 ICOMOS Advisory mission and the recent technical reviews;
  4. Welcomes the adoption of the Metropolitan Plan for Development and Territorial Management 2015-2025 (PMDOT) that explicitly incorporates cultural heritage as one of its key elements, and its alignment with the Management Plan and encourages the State Party to finalize the updating process of the Management Plan as soon as possible, and to submit it to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  5. Noting that subway project now includes only one station within the historical centre, precisely at the emblematic San Francisco Square, and that the Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) did not evaluate the potential impact of alternative locations, requests the State Party, before a final decision is taken on the Metro station location, to apply the HIA methodology to all potential alternative locations, to allow a thorough examination of the proposed options, and to submit the outcomes of this evaluation to the World Heritage Centre for review by ICOMOS;
  6. Welcomes the initiative of the State Party to invite a second ICOMOS Advisory mission to advise further, with a view to supporting the conservation and management of the property and facilitating the successful implementation of the subway project in a manner that will not adversely impact upon the OUV of the property;
  7. Recommends that the Terms of Reference of this Advisory mission include the review of the follow-up given by the State Party to earlier recommendations of the Committee and ICOMOS, the assessment of the new management and planning mechanisms, the subway project including alternative station locations and other matters raised by ICOMOS in the technical review of the HIA, as well as projects such as the Compañia de Jesús project among others, also taking into consideration the 2011 UNESCO Recommendation on Historic Urban Landscapes (HUL);
  8. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6670 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.6 National History Park – Citadel, Sans Souci, Ramiers (Haïti) (C 180) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decisions 34 COM 7B.110, 35 COM 7B.125, 36 COM 99, 37 COM 98, 38 COM 7B.44, adopted at its 34th (Brasilia, 2010), 35th (UNESCO, 2011), 36th (Saint-Petersburg, 2012), 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
  3. Also recalling the numerous Reactive Monitoring and Advisory missions reports that all contain comprehensive sets of recommendations to the State Party on the conservation, management and sustainable development of the property,
  4. Appreciates the efforts made by the State Party to provide follow-up to the 2013 and the 2015 missions and particularly welcomes the appointment of a Director and technical staff of the Park, the progress in conservation actions and the advances made in the management of the property and the undertaking of technical studies;
  5. Expresses its concern however about the serious delays in matters that are essential for the management and conservation of the property, such as the definition of the buffer zone and the preparation of the Management and Conservation Plans and urges the State Party to complete these actions as a matter of urgency, and to submit these plans along with the study “Proposal for Tourism Development at the National Historic Park” by 1 February 2017 to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Specifically recalling its Decision 34 COM 7B.110 requesting the State Party to “halt the construction of Route RN003 within the limits of the property pending the development of other alternatives to be evaluated, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines”, expresses its utmost concern that, in spite of its recommendations to the State Party over the past five years, no progress has been made in the decision-making about the deviation of National Highway n°3 and the character and traffic load of the “Park Road”;
  7. Also urges the State Party not to initiate any works of rehabilitation of the section of National Highway n°3 within the limits of the Park and requests it to submit to the World Heritage Centre, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, the technical project for the improvement of the existing road within the Park, including its route, the engineering work for the canalization of the river, the type of asphalt and the width of the route, for review by the Advisory Bodies, before any works are undertaken;
  8. Reiterates that cultural heritage and landscape expertise should be included in the feasibility studies and that Environmental and Heritage Impact Assessments (EIAs/HIAs) are indispensable to evaluate the impact of major interventions to the Outstanding Universal Value of the property, and also requests the State Party to complete such assessments in relation to National Highway n°3 and the “Park Road” in accordance with ICOMOS Guidance on HIAs for World Cultural Heritage, and any other major interventions that may be planned, and to submit these assessments together with the above-mentioned technical project before any works are undertaken;
  9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6671 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.7 Historic Centre of Puebla (Mexico) (C 416) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.45, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014);
  3. Regrets that the State Party submitted most of the relevant information of its state of conservation report in Spanish, and not in one of the working languages of the World Heritage Convention (English and French);
  4. Congratulates the State Party for the establishment of the Historic Centre and Cultural Heritage Administration and for the process developed within this framework to ensure the interaction and coordination among different levels of government and management and planning tools;
  5. Noting that one of the tasks of the Historic Centre and Cultural Heritage Administration is to develop a management plan for the World Heritage property, recommends that this be considered as a priority action and requests the State Party to submit an electronic and three printed copies of the finalized management plan for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Strongly regrets that the cable car construction has been completed and that the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies were not given the opportunity to review the project prior to commencing the works, as should have been the case, in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  7. Notes however the information provided by the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) that the cable car does not pose a threat to the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), including its integrity and authenticity and, in spite of its completion, also requests the State Party to submit, as soon as possible and in any case no later than 1 September 2016, the complete assessment carried out by INAH, for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
  8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6672 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.8 Historic Centre of the City of Arequipa (Peru) (C 1016) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.46, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Takes note of the World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission that took place in 2014 and requests the State Party to implement its recommendations;
  4. Reiterates its recommendation to the State Party to submit, as a matter of urgency, according to Paragraphs 163-165 of the Operational Guidelines, the final proposal for the buffer zone as a minor boundary modification, to enhance the protection of the visually sensitive areas around the property;
  5. Also takes note of the information provided on the Chilina Bridge and the Via Troncal Interconectora Project and notes with regret that these infrastructural works have been completed in spite of its recommendations over the past years not to initiate the works as long as a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) had not been completed, and also requests the State Party to complete it as a matter of urgency, and submit it for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
  6. Also notes that the HIA for the Chilina Bridge concludes that as a consequence of the construction of the bridge, the surrounding landscape areas are in an accelerated process of transformation;
  7. Urges the State Party to develop a mitigation plan to control the undesirable urbanisation and constructions that are already taking place as a consequence of the works;
  8. Welcomes the completion of the Risk Prevention Management Plan;
  9. Reiterates its request to the State Party to complete the process of reviewing of the Metropolitan Development Plan in order to rationalize inconsistencies with the Master Plan of the property and to confirm whether or not this plan is to be regarded as the management plan for the property, requested by the World Heritage Committee to ensure the protection of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
  10. Invites the State Party to submit as soon as possible more detailed information on the proposal to construct a Monorail Transportation System in the city of Arequipa, for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, and also urges the State Party not to proceed with the further development of the project pending consultations, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  11. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6673 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.9 Historic Inner City of Paramaribo (Suriname) (C 940rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.47, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Commends the State Party for the adoption of the Paramaribo World Heritage Management Plan 2011-2015 and the Emergency Action Plan 2014;
  4. Urges the State Party to take the necessary measures for their implementation, also taking into account the recommendations of the 2013 ICOMOS Advisory mission, with particular attention to the strengthening of the Management Authority and the provision of funding for its operation as well as for urgently needed conservation and restoration works at government-owned monumental buildings;
  5. Expresses its very serious concern about the potential real-estate development at the Waterfront and strongly urges the State Party to withdraw the license granted to a private company and to take the necessary measures for the proper conservation of the Waterfront area and proceed with the proposed extension of the World Heritage property to include a strip of the river of at least 50 meters;
  6. Invites the State Party to submit the above mentioned extension as a minor boundary modification according to paragraphs 163-165 of the Operational Guidelines, for examination by the World Heritage Committee;
  7. Regrets that the technical review of the “Monument for Victims” at the Waterfront could not be completed by the Advisory Bodies due to the incomplete documentation provided by the State Party and requests the State Party to urgently provide information about the construction of this monument;
  8. Welcomes the initiative of the State Party to develop a major Urban Rehabilitation Programme with the support of the Inter-American Development Bank in which the Management Authority of the property should be intimately involved and also invites the State Party to seek the advice of the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies in its further design and implementation;
  9. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6674 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.10 Aksum (Ethiopia) (C 15) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.39, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Congratulates the State Party on the progress made in protecting, conserving and managing the property in accordance with the recommendations of the 2013 Reactive Monitoring mission;
  4. Acknowledges the achievements of the Ethiopian Sustainable Tourism Development Project (ESTDP), broadly in line with the World Heritage Sustainable Tourism Programme, but notes that the designs of the ESTDP interventions should not be applied to other areas of the property;
  5. Requests the State Party to submit details of the façade modification for the Church Museum to the World Heritage Centre for review; to expedite the completion of the Church Museum project, including the conservation of the collections, as soon as possible, and to investigate the archaeological features that were reported as being discovered during the Church Museum building works, and advise the World Heritage Centre accordingly;
  6. Also requests the State Party to finalize and submit the draft Management Plan for Aksum to the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies for review in conjunction with the Thematic Master Plan;
  7. Commends the State Party for gazetting the boundaries of the property and its buffer zone, and further requests the State Party to submit the detailed maps of the physical boundaries of the property and its buffer zone to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2016, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
  8. Requests furthermore the State Party to keep the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies updated on the consolidation project for the reinforcement of the foundation of Stela III and the investigation of the causes of the rising water level in the Tomb of the Brick Arches, to continue to seek expert specialist advice, to avoid any proposal that requires excavation in or around the Tomb of the Brick Arches, and to pursue more cautious options;
  9. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre details of all current and potential developments within the property and the buffer zone, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  10. Encourages the State Party to instigate training for relevant personnel on the requirements of the Convention, the Operational Guidelines and the Management Plan for Aksum, once finalized;
  11. Also encourages the State Party to continue to implement the recommendations of the 2013 Reactive Monitoring mission and to implement the additional recommendations of the 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission;
  12. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6675 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.11 Lower Valley of the Omo (Ethiopia) (C 17) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.48, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Acknowledges the details provided by the State Party in its report on the recently signed three-year European Union-funded project entitled “Promoting the Contribution of World Heritage for Sustainable Development and Reinforcing Capacities for Protection and Conservation of Paleontological Sites in Ethiopia”, which will consider boundaries, and conservation and management of the property;
  4. Notes that documentation submitted by the State Party did not provide clear and precise information on the exact location of the Ethiopian Sugar Development Corporation Project (Kuraz project), even though this was requested by the World Heritage Committee at its 38th session in 2014;
  5. Appreciates, however, that the State Party recently submitted a document to the World Heritage Centre with an official map showing the exact location of the Ethiopian Sugar Development Corporation Project (Kuraz project) vis-à-vis the Lower Valley of the Omo World Heritage property;
  6. Welcomes the revision of the initial plan of sugarcane area from 175,000 ha to 100,000 by the State Party in order to mitigate possible impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
  7. Notes with concern that work on infrastructure and agricultural projects associated with the Kuraz project, including sugar plantations, dams, roads and new villages, have already commenced without submitting adequate impact assessments, and without clarification of the property’s boundaries;
  8. Requests the State Party to ensure the following work has been undertaken and considered by the Committee:
    1. Provision of full details of the Kuraz project by 31 December 2016,
    2. Clarification of the boundaries and submission of proposals for a buffer zone,
    3. Finalization and submission of an improved Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) and a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) based on the clarified boundary and the precise attributes of the OUV,
    4. Provision of the details of the proposed relocation of pastoral communities;
  9. Takes note of the results of the April 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission and urges the State Party to implement its recommendations, particularly the following:
    1. Protect the scientific value and potential of the property, as envisaged at the time of inscription, by clearly defining areas of archaeological potential and defining strategies for its management as a visually coherent landscape with no development between visible outcrops,
    2. Consider adequate visitor and risk management components in the management plan for the intended paleo-tourism activities at the property,
    3. Promote local community involvement in both site management and tourism,
    4. Establish a soil erosion monitoring baseline to define control measures where erosion could pose a threat to fossil-bearing deposits,
    5. Define protocols for back-filling and rehabilitation of open research excavation areas and include an obligation for consolidation of new open areas for all new archaeological research projects,
    6. Establish a soil salinization monitoring baseline in areas of planned irrigation outside the property to monitor and address potential impacts on down gradient fossil-bearing deposits and outcrops;
  10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a report on the state of conservation of the property, and on the steps taken to implement the above-mentioned recommendations, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6676 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.12 Lamu Old Town (Kenya) (C 1055) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decisions 34 COM 7B.46, 35 COM 7B.39, 36 COM 7B.43, 37 COM 7B.40, 38 COM 7B.49, and 39 COM 7B.40, adopted at its 34th (Brasilia, 2010), 35th (UNESCO, 2011), 36th (Saint-Petersburg, 2012), 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014), and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  3. Welcomes the assurance of the State Party that the Lamu-Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport (LAPSSET) corridor project will exclude the Lamu archipelago; but notes that the project will cause strong related development pressures for the entire region including the archipelago;
  4. Expresses its concern that ongoing work on the LAPSSET project, including the completion of the first two buildings on the Lamu mainland, along with the construction of Manda airport, are progressing, without the development of a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), as requested by the Committee,
  5. Urges the State Party to undertake, as a matter of priority, the already requested SEA of the overall LAPSSET project, as a basis for identifying ways to strengthen the protection, development control and management of the property, including a reconsideration of the buffer zone, and to ensure that the Port project and its associated infrastructure and development do not have a major negative impact on the property and its setting; and requests the submission of the SEA to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, by 1 February 2017;
  6. Reiterates its request to the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, as soon as possible in advance of the SEA being undertaken, and by 1 October 2016, for review by the Advisory Bodies, full details of the overall scope of the LAPSSET project, including the Lamu resort city, and clarification of fishing plans, mangrove planting, and surveys of coastal morphology;
  7. Regrets that details of the project for Manda airport, including the construction of a new terminal building and the lengthening of the runway, was not submitted to the World Heritage Centre with a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA), as requested, before the project was approved, and also requests the State Party to provide details of this project to the World Heritage Centre;
  8. Also regrets that no progress has been reported on the revision of the management plan to include a new chapter covering the LAPSSET development project on how the impacts identified within the 2014 HIA on the first phase would be mitigated, how recommendations from the HIA will be implemented, and how the wider setting of the property will be protected, whether by an enlarged buffer zone or other means;
  9. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to take into account the recommendations of both the 2014 HIA and the 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission as it continues to develop the LAPSSET project and to strengthen the integration of the LAPSSET project with the Lamu City Council and the National Museums of Kenya (NMK), including, in particular, by appointing an NMK representative on the LAPSSET Board, and to widen and strengthen community engagement;
  10. Considers that in the absence of adequate detailed information and impact assessments on the overall major LAPSSET project, and any detailed understanding as to how the already identified negative impacts from the first phase will be mitigated, that the property is under potential danger from the acknowledged development pressures associated with the port project;
  11. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
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http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6677 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.13 Old Towns of Djenné (Mali) (C 116 rev) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.41, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Regrets that the State Party did not submit a state of conservation report, as requested by the Committee;
  4. Notes the results from the 2016 Reactive Monitoring mission to the property and encourages the State Party to improve the state of conservation of the historic town and of the archaeological sites, and the lack of substantial progress achieved in the implementation of the Priority Action Plan adopted in 2014;
  5. Considers that the optimal administrative, financial and security conditions are not present at this time to ensure the safeguarding of all component parts of the property and the protection of its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
  6. Also considers that the property is threatened by both ascertained and potential danger, in accordance with paragraphs 177 to 179 of the Operational Guidelines;
  7. Decides to inscribe Old Towns of Djenné (Mali) on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
  8. Adopts the following provisional list of corrective measures for implementation within the next three years:
For the archaeological sites:
a) Protection, boundaries and buffer zones:
(i) Redefine the buffer zone taking into account identifiable natural elements and installing visible and resistant markers,
(ii) Re-examine protection for the Kaniana and Tonomba ancient city sites to control construction,
(iii) Undertake the necessary formalities to provide land titles to all four sites,
(iv) Reinforce surveillance at the sites and adequately protect areas where surface artefacts are concentrated,
b) Mitigation of erosion:
(i) Carry out a precise condition survey of the gullies prior to the implementation of anti-erosion measures,
(ii) Reinforce existing systems based on the technical study of hydrological dynamics and in consultation with an expert on soil protection,
c) Enhancement of sites:
(i) Update existing cartography to include all component parts and to identify visitation and use routes,
(ii) Update existing signage and install complementary panels where needed,
(iii) Utilise research information to increase awareness and promote the significance of these sites,
For the historic town:
d) Protection, integrity and authenticity:
(i) Define an adequate buffer zone and clearly delimitate it to prevent further illegal and unplanned occupations,
(ii) Define conservation and maintenance regulations for the building stock at the historic town,
(iii) Develop a materials bank to facilitate access to materials to support earthen architecture maintenance actions by the local inhabitants,
(iv) Implement measures to address illegal occupations at the river banks,
e) Sanitation and waste management:
(i) Revitalise local sanitation services to improve controls at the neighbourhood level,
(ii) Install restriction and information panels at the river banks to assist in deterring illegal waste dumping,
Management system:
f) Develop, adopt and commence the implementation of a conservation and management plan for all the components at the property,
g) Finalise the adoption and commence the priority implementation of the developed urban regulatory measures,
h) Strengthen institutional frameworks and competences to enhance enforcement of regulatory measures and planning tools,
i) Secure resources to strengthen the activities of the Cultural Mission and provide logistic support for awareness-raising and promotion actions,
j) Allow for the definition and full operation of coherent and inclusive management arrangements, including an operational Management Committee and regular consultation with neighbourhood leaders, traditional, customary and religious authorities;
9. Calls upon the international community to support the State Party, in co-operation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, in any way possible for priority conservation, management measures and capacity building programmes;
10. Requests the State Party, as soon as it is feasible, and in close consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, to further develop the above-mentioned provisional list of corrective measures with an updated timeframe for their implementation, as well as a proposal for the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR);
11. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6678 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.14 Le Morne Cultural Landscape (Mauritius) (C 1259bis) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  2. Recalling Decision 39COM 7B.42, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
  3. Welcomes the positive benefits that the property’s inscription is seen to deliver in terms of the historical and cultural identity of the Creole community and its associations;
  4. Notes that the revised revised Management Plan (2014-2019), including a Critical Viewpoint Analysis and Planning Policy Guidelines is now in place and complemented by a Land Management Plan (2014 – 2019), a Lagoon Management Plan (2013) and a Local Economic Development Plan for Le Morne village; and also welcomes its effective implementation by the Le Morne Heritage Trust Fund;
  5. Encourages the State Party to explore ways to augment the Management Plan to allow for appropriate development by residents of Le Morne village, in terms of settlement space and basic infrastructure needs;
  6. Further welcomes the recent collaboration with the University of Mauritius on Maroon archaeology and acknowledges the desirability of the Makak site having public access for visitors;
  7. Also notes that there is still a lack of resolution over the legal challenges associated with the proposed development in the property by Le Morne Brabant IRS Co Ltd (LMB), a situation that has persisted since the time of inscription, and that the developer has withheld access to their leased property, and thus to the main route to the Le Morne mountain and the Makak archaeological site, with implications for conservation, property management, and the development of heritage activities;
  8. Also encourages the State Party to ensure that the Le Morne Heritage Trust Fund continues to manage and conserve the property to the fullest extent possible under these circumstances;
  9. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6679 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.15 Island of Mozambique (Mozambique) (C 599) The World Heritage Committee,

  1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.51, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  3. Takes note of the ongoing progress on the restoration and rehabilitation of buildings within the World Heritage property;
  4. Also notes that, to date, only the Terms of Reference have been finalized for the revision of the Management and Conservation Plan for Mozambique Island (2010 – 2014), and reiterates its request that the revised Plan be duly evaluated and updated with the close participation of all stakeholders, including local communities, and that it include issues related to disaster preparedness, population increase on the island, continued strengthening of the Conservation Office of Mozambique Island (GACIM), coordination between various institutional stakeholders, and the need to promote more interaction with partners for technical assistance and fundraising;
  5. Further notes that the State Party demarcated a revised buffer zone in 2011 but has not yet submitted it to the World Heritage Centre pending a study of the existing underwater archaeology, and urges the State Party to finalize and adopt a revised buffer zone, in conformity with Paragraph 107 of the Operational Guidelines, at the earliest opportunity;
  6. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to approve the updated legislation for the protection and conservation of heritage;
  7. Requests the State Party to forward details of the project for the rehabilitation of the Mozambique Island Hospital and the São Lourenco Fortress, along with a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) for the project in conformity with Paragraph 110 of the Operational Guidelines, to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies, and also to inform the Committee, through the World Heritage Centre, about any future projects that may potentially affect the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, including its authenticity or integrity, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, before making any decisions that would be difficult to reverse;
  8. Also requests the State Party to invite a joint UNESCO/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess the state of conservation of the overall building stock of the property;
  9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a progress report and, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
]]>
http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6680 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
40 COM 7B.16 Historic Centre of Agadez (Niger) (C 1268)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.52, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Notes the progress made by the State Party in addressing the recommendations made by the Committee at the time of inscription, and encourages the State Party to continue to address and resolve the matters raised at that time;
  • Reiterates its encouragement to the State Party to develop a Sustainable Tourism Development and Management Plan, and furthermore, to integrate it with the property’s overall Conservation and Management Plan that is intended to be updated in 2016;
  • Reiterates its request to the State Party to consult with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to more fully develop key monitoring indicators;
  • Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6681 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.17 Sukur Cultural Landscape (Nigeria) (C 938) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Notes with deep concern the security situation in North-Eastern Nigeria, in particular the attacks on 12 December 2014 at the Sukur Cultural Landscape;
    3. Welcoming the joint efforts of the State Party and local hunters/vigilante groups in weakening insurgents attack operations in the surrounds of the Sukur Cultural Landscape;
    4. Commends the Sukur Cultural Landscape community for its resilience to remain steadfast to its traditional life and to restore normalcy in its settlements;
    5. Takes note of the urgency to rehabilitate the Hidi Palace, the Palace Square, the Black Smith Homestead, the paved walkways and ritual structures, as well as social, educational and information centres, and to revive intangible cultural heritage practices;
    6. Invites the State Party to submit an International Assistance request to support the provision of local building materials for the restoration of the traditional buildings and the desecrated ritual sites and festival grounds, the repair of social and education buildings, and the replacement of stolen or vandalized equipment for the conservation of the property;
    7. Requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, in order to assess the state of conservation of the property in relation to its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), in particular, the restored paved stone walkways, the rehabilitation of the Hidi Palace and the Palace Square and the revitalization of the living cultural heritage;
    8. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6682 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.18 Island of Saint-Louis (Senegal) (C 956bis) The World Heritage Committee, 

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decisions 34 COM 7B.51, 35 COM 7B.43, 37 COM 7B.42 and 38 COM 7B.54 adopted at its 34th (Brasilia, 2010), 35th (UNESCO, 2011), 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Commends the State Party for its efforts in developing a 2015-2020 Action Plan for the implementation of the Safeguarding and Enhancement Plan of Saint-Louis (PSMV), in a participatory and inclusive approach with local stakeholders;
    4. Takes note of the decree of the Governor of St. Louis issued on 19 January 2016 to suspend all demolition operations of buildings threatening ruin inside the property;
    5. Expresses nonetheless its grave concern about the significant state of disrepair and lack of restoration and maintenance of several historic buildings, illustrated by the collapse of an old building in an advanced state of disrepair in March 2016, injuring children;
    6. Also expresses its concern at the very low level of implementation of the recommendations of the reactive monitoring mission of 2014 and the recommendations made by the Committee since 2010, and urges the State Party to take urgent measures to accelerate the implementation of these recommendations, with particular attention to the following:
      1. Establish provisions specifying management and decision-making modalities as well as the means to strengthen collaboration between stakeholders, notably the municipal development agency, the town hall, and the management body of the property,
      2. Promote the integration of regulatory measures in force already contained in the PSMV, and recruit sworn-in agents to reinforce the application of these regulatory measures, including sanction measures,
      3. Define mechanisms to study, advise and vet projects proposing modifications of structures or new constructions, and to control and monitor these projects during their implementation by heritage architects,
      4. Conduct a diagnostic study on the most degraded public buildings, and seek funding to carry out emergency restoration work to increase occupant safety and improve heritage protection,
      5. Strengthen existing capacities in conservation and management at various local, district and national levels, and provide technical, material and financial resources for the implementation of sustainable conservation and management measures,
      6. Strengthen conservation and protection of the property through information and awareness raising actions targeting local communities and institutional and policy decision-makers;
    7. Requests the State Party to invite a joint UNESCO/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to assess the general state of conservation of the property and progress made in the implementation of these recommendations; 
    8. Considers that the lack of significant progress in the urgent implementation of these recommendations would put the property in specific and proven imminent danger, in accordance with Paragraph 179 of the Operational Guidelines;
    9. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the points mentioned above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the absence of significant progress in the implementation of these recommendations, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6683 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.19 Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape (South Africa) (C 1099bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 36 COM 7B.48, 37 COM 7B.43 and 38 COM 8B.48, adopted at its 36th (Saint-Petersburg, 2012), 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively;
    3. Commends the State Party for the development of the Environmental Management Framework and measures adopted to control the processing of existing mining rights and to prohibit further prospecting licenses in the new buffer zone;
    4. Notes that the proposed extension of the Venetia Diamond mine from open pit to underground operation will require additional infrastructure within the footprint of the existing mine, that impact assessments have indicated that the change of process should reduce the environmental impacts of the mine, and that the water infrastructure arrangements within the property will be mitigated, and requests the State Party to continue regular monitoring of the mine activities;
    5. Acknowledges that key parts of the Integrated Management Plan (IMP) are being implemented, and also acknowledges that the State Party has clarified that there are no proposals for a projected power station and a coal/gas field north of the Soutpansberg as mentioned in the IMP;
    6. Also notes that some work has been undertaken on stabilizing the K2 archaeological site, and further notes that, on 11 July 2016, the State Party has submitted to the World Heritage Centre new material on progress with the development of the conservation plans for all the archaeological sites and a programme to address the serious deterioration reported by the 2012 mission, in line with Decision 36 COM 7B.48 and that this material will be reviewed by ICOMOS;
    7. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6684 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.20 Ruins of Kilwa Kisiwani and Ruins of Songo Mnara (United Republic of Tanzania) (C 144
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  • Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7A.22 and 38 COM 7A.27, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
  • Notes the progress made by the State Party in responding to the previous recommendations of the Committee and in meeting the Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR), following such removal in 2014;
  • Congratulates the State Party on the continuing programme of protective and physical conservation works at the property;
  • Requests the State Party to finalize the process for establishing the boundaries of the property, its buffer zones and their regulatory measures and submit, by 1 December 2017, a proposal for a minor boundary modification, in accordance to Paragraphs 163-165 of the Operational Guidelines, for examination by the World Heritage Committee;
  • Also requests the State Party to finalize and submit, by 1 December 2017, the updated Management Plan and completed Land Use Plan for Kilwa Kisiwani, for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies,
  • Further requests the State Party to implement the full set of recommendations of the December 2013 mission;
  • Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6685 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.21 Stone Town of Zanzibar (United Republic of Tanzania) (C 173rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.45, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Acknowledges the actions taken by the State Party to implement its recommendations and urges the State Party to secure the necessary resources for the full operation of the newly created management arrangements, including the Development Control Unit (DCU) and the strengthening of the Stone Town Conservation and Development Authority (STCDA);
    4. Notes the results from the condition survey of the property and requests the State Party to continue its efforts on addressing the state of the building stock by implementing conservation and restoration projects, by developing appropriate methodological guidance and an effective monitoring system, and by increasing technical capacities and skills;
    5. Expressing concern at the shortcomings in the documentation submitted and the methodologies to be used for the proposed restoration of Beit-el-Ajaib (House of Wonders), highlighted by an Advisory Bodies technical review, also urges the State Party to halt all work on this building apart from urgent shoring, and to develop detailed documentation as indicated in the technical review, including archival research, and submit this revised documentation to the World Heritage Centre for further review by the Advisory Bodies before any work on the proposed project commences;
    6. Also notes the results of the 2016 Reactive Monitoring mission to the property and further urges the State Party to implement the agreed upon measures, in accordance with the proposed timelines, regarding the Specific Recommendations for Procedures to Adequately Control Development and Promote Conservation;
    7. Also requests the State Party to finalize consultations with the current property management of the Mambo Msiige building to implement all feasible mitigation measures, as outlined in the 2014 and 2016 mission reports, to lessen negative impacts of the hotel on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, and to provide a proposal for this work, including a timeline for implementation, to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    8. Further requests the State Party to provide project proposals and details on the potential urban interventions for the Container Port, for any commercial space on the Darajani Corridor, for the proposed promenade along the Mizingani seawall, and for potential restoration interventions and use plans for the Tippu Tip House, and the Creek Road Chawl Building, to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies before any permits are granted for implementation;
    9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a progress report and, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6686 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.22 Memphis and its Necropolis – the Pyramid Fields from Giza to Dahshur (Egypt) (C 86) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 28 COM 15B.50, 29 COM 7B.45 and 31 COM 7B.61, adopted at its 28th (Suzhou, 2004), 29th (Durban, 2005) and 31st (Christchurch, 2007) sessions respectively,
    3. Notes the delays in the implementation of conservation projects at the property, and the State Party's intention to submit shortly a Management Plan for the property; and urges the State Party to submit a detailed, integrated Management Plan taking into account the July 2015 ICOMOS Advisory mission recommendations;
    4. Also urges the State Party to complete the Retrospective Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) for the property for examination by the World Heritage Committee;
    5. Further urges the State Party to define the buffer zone for the property and submit a Minor Boundary Modification proposal, in accordance to Paragraph 164 and Annex 11 of the Operational Guidelines, and define the immediate and wider setting to further protect the integrity of the property;
    6. Requests the State Party to remove the fill materials from the World Heritage property and refrain from further use of the property for solid waste purposes;
    7. Takes notes with great concern of the rapid and intense urban growth of the Cairo Megalopolis and its related urban encroachment and traffic pressure that affect the property;
    8. Also takes note that the alternative routes to the Ring Road to the North of the Giza Plateau and through the Maryoutiyah and Mansouriyah canals, developed by the State Party as recommended by the World Heritage Committee at its 19th session (Berlin, 1995), are no longer sufficient to address the traffic needs of the area surrounding the property, and that the State Party is seeking a viable traffic solution protecting the property while addressing the growing development pressures in the Cairo Megalopolis;
    9. Further takes note of the recommendations of the ICOMOS Advisory mission, that an underground tunnel is the only acceptable solution for a road crossing the property, and requests the State Party, in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, to submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, and before any irreversible decisions on road projects are made, the following documents:
      1. a detailed traffic management study and plan of the area,
      2. any projects for an underground tunnel inside the property or other road projects in its vicinity,
      3. a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) for all of the above, including remote sensing and physical investigations of potential archaeological remains;
    10. Notes the document on the proposed road cutting (referred to as an open tunnel) called the Mansouris Axis – Cairo Fayoum Ring road, and the related air quality report, submitted by the State Party, and acknowledges that proposals for an open road cutting across the property are not in line with the recommendations of the mission, as discussed with the State Party on site, and could have a major, irreversible adverse impact on the OUV of the property;
    11. Also requests the State Party to provide information of urban or architectural developments that could potentially affect the OUV of the property, in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
    12. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6687 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.23 Erbil Citadel (Iraq) (C 1437) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.20, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the State Party for the actions undertaken in response to the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations at the time of the property’s inscription;
    4. Encourages the State Party to continue with the implementation of the measures and activities already undertaken, so as to prevent and to limit the threats to the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
    5. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6688 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.24 Archaeological Site of Cyrene (Libya) (C 190) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.56, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Expresses its concern that the State Party is not in a position to submit a report on the state of conservation of the property, as requested by the Committee at its 39th session in 2015;
    4. Expresses its high concern regarding the information provided by the Libyan heritage professionals during the International Meeting on the Safeguarding of Libyan Cultural Heritage, on the state of conservation of the property and the threats it incurs in the prevailing situation;
    5. Requests the State Party to submit further information on the state of conservation of the property as soon as the security situation permits, and notably concerning the measures undertaken to physically protect the property from the urban encroachment and vandalism;
    6. Urges the State Party to implement the requested short term measures for monitoring, protecting the site from potential vandalism and fire prevention;
    7. Also requests the State Party to extend the implementation of these short term measures to the Archaeological Site of Leptis Magna and the Archaeological Site of Sabratha;
    8. Calls on the international community to provide financial and technical support to Libya to implement the short and medium term measures identified during the International Meeting on the Safeguarding of Libyan Cultural Heritage;
    9. Decides, in conformity with Article 11.4 of the Convention and Paragraphs 177 and 179 of the Operational Guidelines, to inscribe the Archaeological Site of Cyrene (Libya) on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6689 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.25 Rock-Art Sites of Tadrart Acacus (Libya) (C 287) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.57, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Regrets that the State Party did not submit a report on the state of conservation of the property, as requested by the Committee at its 39th session in 2015;
    4. Expresses its high concern regarding the information provided by the Libyan heritage professionals during the International Expert Meeting on the Safeguarding of Libyan Cultural Heritage, on the state of conservation of the property in the prevailing situation;
    5. Requests the State Party to submit further information on the state of conservation of the property as soon as the security situation permits;
    6. Decides, in conformity with Article 11.4 of the Convention and Paragraphs 177 and 179 of the Operational Guidelines, to inscribe the Rock-Art Sites of Tadrart Acacus (Libya) on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6690 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.26 Bahla Fort (Oman) (C 433) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.4, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the State Party for the important actions undertaken to ensure the sustainable management and conservation of the property;
    4. Regrets that neither the finalized version of the Management Plan nor a request for a minor boundary modification to enlarge the buffer zone have been submitted;
    5. Urges the State Party to submit the finalized version of the Management Plan, including the legal framework that will support its implementation, to the World Heritage Centre as soon as possible;
    6. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, as soon as possible and based on Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, a document summarizing the conservation and management actions already undertaken and planned at the property, and showing the articulation between them and with the finalized version of the Management Plan;
    7. Also requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to visit the property as soon as possible;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit, by 1 February 2017, a request for a minor boundary modification in view of enlarging the buffer zone, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
    9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6691 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.27 Historic Jeddah, the Gate to Makkah (Saudi Arabia) (C 1361) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.21, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the significant achievements in many key areas for the effective protection, conservation and management of the property in response to the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations of 2014;
    4. Encourages the State Party to set out a detailed database of the attributes relating to the Outstanding Universal Value of the property, such as the tower houses, other urban houses, the wikalas, mosques and Zawiyas (and not just the protected historic buildings) as well as the spatial patterns of urban forms and defined urban quarters;
    5. Recommends that the State Party continue its efforts through the elaboration of a comprehensive conservation strategy based on legal, financial, planning and technical measures that aims to achieve a position where the downward conservation trend has been reversed; and also encourages the involvement of owners, residents and the private sector in its implementation; and to submit this document to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    6. Also recommends that the urban and spatial dimension of the property be fully reflected in the policies, measures and tools adopted to ensure the conservation of the latter; using if necessary the approach carried by the Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (2011);
    7. Further recommends that the State Party incorporate a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) approach into the regulatory and management framework and to carry out specific HIAs for all projects that may impact on the Outstanding Universal Value of the property, in accordance with the ICOMOS Guidance on HIAs for Cultural World Heritage properties;
    8. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017 an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6692 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.28 Gebel Barkal and the Sites of the Napatan Region (Sudan) (C 1073) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.5, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Deeply regrets that the State Party did not submit a report on the state of conservation of the property, as requested by the Committee at its 38th session in 2014;
    4. Expresses its concern about the absence of information about the state of conservation of the property despite the ongoing Sudan-Qatar Archaeological Project;
    5. Requests the State Party to submit detailed information on the state of conservation of the property and reiterates the need to address, as a matter of urgency, the previous recommendations, namely to:
      1. Provide a report for each of the five component parts,
      2. Fully develop the management plan and to elaborate a comprehensive monitoring system,
      3. Complete the mapping of the property according to the requirements set forth in the Operational Guidelines;
    6. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6693 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.29 Archaeological Site of Carthage (Tunisia) (C 37) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.6, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Congratulates the State Party for the efforts undertaken in the protection and conservation of the property, including the acquisition of archaeological land and the evacuation of the Punic port of abusive craft, despite a difficult political, security and financial situation, and encourages the pursuit of its efforts regarding this issue;
    4. Requests the State Party to provide the World Heritage Centre with a summary report on the results of the archaeological excavations and the possible plans concerning their conservation and enhancement;
    5. Strongly urges the State Party to resolve the land issues relating to the declassification/reclassification of certain archaeological zones within the property that prevent the conservation and the sustainable management of the property, considering the environmental and social impact of the adopted solutions;
    6. Also reiterates its invitation to the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre a proposal for the modification of the boundaries according to the procedure indicated in Paragraphs 163-165 of the Operational Guidelines and recommends that the said proposal concerns the establishment of a buffer zone, as well as a modification to the boundaries of the property inscribed aiming to align them with the national boundaries, as requested by the joint 2012 World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission;
    7. Invites the State Party to provide information on the criteria employed to define the buffer zone, and the governing regulations and measures for the protection and integrity of the property and the provisions taken for its management;
    8. Further reiterates its request to the State Party to :
      1. Adopt and implement the Protection and Presentation Plan (PPMV) for the property,
      2. Prepare an Enhancement Plan and a Tourism Management Plan preventing the uncontrolled proliferation of commercial concerns within the property, in particular at the UNESCO Square and in the vicinity of the Anthonin Baths,
      3. Conceive and implement an Archaeological and Conservation Strategy for the property,
      4. Coordinate management and conservation tools for the property as well as the roles of the different actors concerned;
    9. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6694 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.30 Ancient Building Complex in the Wudang Mountains (China) (C 705) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.9, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Takes note of the ongoing work and remaining design issues for the Yuzhen Palace uplift project, as well as the ongoing work on the mangement plan and other management issues;
    4. Requests the State Party to adopt the second proposal for the final shape of the platform, infilling the small channels to form a more natrual shoreline;
    5. Endorses the proposal to reinstall the archaeological remains at the new grade level as outlined in the State Party report, but also requests the State Party to ensure that interpretation and presentation of these remains and the entire Yezhen Palace complex should occur in a way that allows visitors to understand the changes that the propety has undergone as part of the uplift project;
    6. Notes that the State Party has submitted a draft of the Protection and Management Plan for the Ancient Building Complex in the Wudang Mountains, and further requests the State Party to finalize this plan, with a focus on promotion of living heritage, and a strengthened cultural landscape approach, and submit it to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    7. Requests furthermore the State Party to institute a strong, long-term programme of monitoring of visitor management, including not only the number of visitors, but also any impacts that visitors may be having, particularly on the more sensitive areas of the property;
    8. Regretting that the State Party has not yet responded to the December 2013 letter of the World Heritage Centre seeking clarification on the components of the property and its buffer zone, urges the State Party to address this matter with representatives of the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, in order to reach a final agreement which, if necessary, should be presented for examination by the World Heritage Committee;
    9. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6695 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.31 Historic Ensemble of the Potala Palace, Lhasa (China) (C 707ter) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 33 COM 8B.47, 35 COM 7B.65 and 38 COM 7B.10, adopted at its 33rd (Seville, 2009), 35th (UNESCO, 2011) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Notes with satisfaction the measures taken to mitigate the impact of the Shenli Mall on the visual qualities of the corridor between Jokhang Temple and the Potala Palace, including the dismantling of whole glasshouse on top of the mall and the renovation of the façade in traditional Tibetan architectural style;
    4. Noting the conservation actions currently being implemented at the property, commends the State Party for the efforts made to integrate traditional knowledge systems and craftsmanship in conservation works and encourages the formal integration of this approach in conservation and management arrangements for the property;
    5. Also notes that Cultural Heritage Conservation Plans (CHCP) for the three component parts of the property and the Urban Master Plan for Lhasa are being developed and reiterates its request that copies of these documents, with a synthesis in English, be submitted to the World Heritage Centre prior to their finalization and approval, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    6. Takes note of the outcomes of the April 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission to the property and urges the State Party to take into account and implement the following recommendations:
      1. Include provisions in the CHCP for the Potala Palace to continue the monitoring of soil erosion and bedrock conditions and to identify any measures required to anticipate potential structural stability issues,
      2. Include provisions in the Urban Master Plan to maintain the spatial linkages and visual corridors between the component parts of the property, their historical context and wider setting, and to promote and maintain the traditional urban structure and layout of the buffer zones. This should include, but should not be limited to, regulations regarding acceptable heights, visual qualities, façades and roofs,
      3. Include mechanisms in the Urban Master Plan for the approval of development projects, including requirements for Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs), archaeological excavations (where relevant) and the creation of a coordinated permit system,
      4. Ensure that the sacred character and pilgrimage use of Lhasa is fully articulated with the management arrangements for the property,
      5. If necessary, develop a Cultural Environment Management Plan to provide complementary measures for the Urban Master Plan,
      6. Explore alternative locations for the telegraph tower that currently impacts the visual qualities and predominance of the Potala Palace in the landscape;
    7. Requests the State Party to provide, following the procedure for boundary clarifications outlined in the Operational Guidelines, scaled maps of the buffer zones for the three component parts of the property, in line with the boundaries approved at the time of inscription, along with details of height restrictions within the buffer zones, as requested by Decision 33 COM 8B.47;
    8. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6696 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.32 Temple and Cemetery of Confucius and the Kong Family Mansion in Qufu (China) (C 704)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.11, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Takes note of the full scope of information provided by the State Party regarding the comprehensive redevelopment of the Ancient Panchi Pond area that is underway within the buffer zone of the property;
  • Also takes note with satisfaction of the submission by the State Party of the Detailed Planning and Building Scheme for Construction Project of the Ancient Panchi Pond in the Buffer Zone of the World Heritage in Qufu (July 2015), the Conservation Planning for Temple and Cemetery of Confucius and the Kong Family Mansion in Qufu document, and a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) (August 2015), as requested;
  • Urges the State Party to carry out HIAs, with a specific section focusing on the potential impact of the project on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), as a part of all future plans for major restorations or new construction projects, and to continue to inform the Committee, through the World Heritage Centre, about any future projects that may potentially affect the OUV of the property, including its authenticity or integrity, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, before making any decisions that would be difficult to reverse;
  • Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6697 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.33 The Grand Canal (China) (C 1443) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.23 adopted by the Committee at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Notes the efforts made by the State Party in the implementation of the recommendations of the Committee, and requests the State Party to:
      1. Continue its reflection and work for the protection of the surroundings of the Grand Canal to guarantee the sustainable maintenance of the attributes of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), and specifically:
        1. study whether an adjustment will be required to the buffer zones in the sectors of the property which are not affected by the request for a minor boundary modification under examination at the present session,
        2. confirm that the regulatory standards in force for constructions apply to all the buffer zones and are effectively taken into consideration by the municipal development plans,
        3. further develop the concept of a “visual corridor”, for example by defining priority cones of vision and protecting them, if necessary, from the negative impact of new buildings,
      2. Continue the identification work concerning the historical and archaeological signification of constitutive elements of the property,
      3. Inform the Committee of the effective functioning and results of the different components of the property, in particular:
        1. the monitoring system for the Grand Canal that has recently been established,
        2. the maintenance and improvement policy for water quality in the different sectors of the property,
        3. conservation and policy programmes for the traditional villages and urban zones of a historic character alongside the Grand Canal,
        4. tourism development and coordination programmes,
        5. training programmes and activities aimed at strengthening the capacities of staff concerned with the conservation, valorisation and promotion of the property;
    4. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6698 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.34 Silk Roads: the Routes Network of Chang’an – Tian-shan Corridor (China / Kazakhstan / Kyrgyzstan) (C 1442)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.24, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Welcomes the detailed reports submitted by the three State Parties of China, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan addressing the requests made by the Committee at the time of inscription of the property;
  • Notes the on-going and essential work on interpretation to allow a better understanding of how the 22 component sites in China relate to the overall Changa’an-Tianshan corridor and to the wider Silk roads network, and urges the relevant States Parties to complete their ongoing interpretation projects;
  • Commends the initiative of the State Party of China to use interpretive material to enhance heritage outreach efforts and encourage local communities to participate in site management and conservation work, and suggests that ways should be found to promote this work in other components of the property;
  • Also notes that research on important smaller sites in Kyrgyzstan along the corridor is ongoing, and that minor boundary modifications might be brought forward, in due course, by the State Party of Kyrgyzstan for one or more caravanserais and from the State Party of China for selected beacon watch towers;
  • Further notes the detailed work undertaken on the remains of elaborate water management systems, and that a minor boundary modification might be brought forward by the State Party of Kazakhstan for the irrigation system that supported Karamergen;
  • Also commends the initiative of the State Party of China to explore new technologies for daily monitoring work in 22 component sites in China to improve data collection, as well as its collaboration with the ICOMOS International Conservation Centre in Xian (IICC-Xi’an) on an ongoing programme to explore new methods;
  • Supports the proposed collaboration between the States Parties of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan and the International Centre on Space Technologies for Natural and Cultural Heritage (HIST, China) in relation to monitoring of remote sites;
  • Regrets that no substantial progress has been made yet to create management plans for the eight component sites in Kazakhstan, and also urges the State Party to make progress with this work and submit the completed plans to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies by 1 December 2017, and requests the State Party of Kyrgyzstan to update its management plans and confirm that this has been achieved, by 1 December 2017;
  • Expresses its extreme concern that proposals for a major road directly across the Talgar component site in Kazakhstan were planned and started being implemented without any details being provided either to the Silk Roads Coordinating Committee or to the World Heritage Centre, and in contravention with the national legislation;
  • Taking into account a moratorium imposed by the State Party of Kazakhstan on the road and bridge construction, further urges the State Party of Kazakhstan to explore other routes outside the boundaries of the Talgar site and its buffer zone, and to dismantle the parts of the bridge that have already been constructed;
  • Also expresses its concern that reconstruction work is ongoing at the Talgar site without any details having been submitted for review and seemingly without adequate evidence to justify the work, and that residential development has been built in the buffer zone, which has a highly adverse impact on the setting of the Talgar Citadel;
  • Urges furthermore the State Party of Kazakhstan to halt the residential development in the buffer zone and to provide full details of the project to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
  • Recommends the State Party of Kazakhstan to address the governance issue at the local level in order to ensure adequate planning, efficient management and decision-making;
  • Urges moreover the State Party of Kazakhstan to address the recommendations of the ICOMOS Advisory mission, initiated by the State Party and carried out in March 2016, with regard to protection, management and awareness-raising and to take all necessary actions to ensure the safeguarding of the authenticity and integrity of the Talgar component site of the serial property;
  • Also requests the State Party of Kazakhstan to invite, as soon as possible, a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the Talgar component site and other sites of the serial property in Kazakhstan, to consider the implementation of the recommendations of the Advisory mission and the progress accomplished with the development of management plans for all components sites in Kazakhstan;
  • Further requests the States Parties to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, a joint updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6699 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.35 Hill Forts of Rajasthan (India) (C 247rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.65, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Noting with concern that, despite reassurances provided by the State Party, the Management Plan for Jaisalmer Fort is still in a drafting phase, requests the State Party to expedite the completion of the Management Plan for Jaisalmer Fort and to submit the final draft, along with sub-plans for visitor management, risk preparedness and livelihood generation for the local population, to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, prior to its adoption;
    4. Also requests the State Party to provide all available studies on the mining in the setting of Chittorgargh Fort to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, for review by the Advisory Bodies, in order to ensure that there are no negative impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
    5. Further requests the State Party to provide detailed information on the consolidation measures undertaken and foreseen for the Kumbhalgarh Fort, to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    6. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6700 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.36 Sangiran Early Man Site (Indonesia) (C 593) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.13, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Noting the progress made with the implementation of the previous Committee decisions and the Reactive Monitoring mission recommendations, encourages the State Party to establish, as soon as possible, the Integrated Management Bureau to ensure coordinated management, conservation and monitoring of the property;
    4. Also notes the improvements made with the establishment of an integrated management system and requests the State Party to complete the integrated management plan, together with the comprehensive conservation and tourism management plans and submit these plans to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    5. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6701 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.37 Masjed-e Jame of Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of) (C 1397) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.15, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the progress made by the State Party with the revision of the Meydan-e Atiq project, taking into account the Committee’s previous requests, and notes with satisfaction that no structural connection is foreseen between the new galleries and the historic walls of the mosque or the structures connected to the mosque walls;
    4. Strongly encourages the State Party to take into account the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property when evaluating the suitability of new projects in the vicinity of the Masjed-e Jame, especially with regard to their correlation to the property’s historic environment;
    5. Reiterates its recommendation that Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs), with a specific section focusing on the potential impact of the project on the OUV, be carried out for any future development in the buffer zone, in particular if these are intended to be directly attached to the mosque complex or would be located in its immediate vicinity; and requests that before making any decisions that would be difficult to reverse, the State Party inform the Committee, through the World Heritage Centre, of any project which may affect the OUV of the property, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
    6. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre detailed information on potential atmosphere and noise pollution generated by the urban revitalization projects around the property, as well as on the potential impacts of vibrations from the underground road on the static behaviour of the Mashed-e Jame structures, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    7. Reiterates its request to the State Party to finalize, as a matter of urgency, an Integrated Conservation and Management Plan, and submit it to the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies for review, before proceeding with its adoption;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for review by the Advisory Bodies.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6702 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.38 Shahr-i Sokhta (Iran, Islamic Republic of) (C 1456) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.26, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the State Party for the actions it has undertaken in response to the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations;
    4. Recommends that the State Party continue with the implementation of the activities that have been undertaken to fulfil the Committee's recommendations;
    5. Requests the State Party to complete, as soon as possible, the comprehensive Management Plan by integrating it with regional policies, updating the action plan and preparing an implementation timeframe and an improved monitoring system, and to submit the final draft of the Management Plan to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    6. Also requests the State Party to finalize as soon as possible the digital cartography for the property and its adjacent sites as well as the GIS-based database for the archaeological site and its related findings.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6703 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.39 Fujisan, sacred place and source of artistic inspiration (Japan) (C 1418) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 37 COM 8B.29, adopted at its 37th session (Phnom Penh, 2013),
    3. Acknowledges the well-detailed and informative progress report from the State Party on work undertaken to address the requests of the Committee at the time of inscription;
    4. Welcomes the considerable efforts and progress made by the State Party in putting in place an inter-disciplinary and sustainable management system that draws in local communities and considers both the property and its buffer zone as an overall cultural landscape unit;
    5. Also welcomes the focus on bringing together experts and communities, cultural and natural dimensions, spiritual and recreational needs, conservation and development;
    6. Also acknowledges the significant coordination between the many authorities involved in the property in taking this work forward and considers that if the momentum is to be maintained, there will be a need for strong coordination from the Fujisan World Cultural Heritage Council and effective sharing of information;
    7. Also considers that the approach being promoted provides an excellent example of how the management of a property can deal not only with conservation, but can add value through enhancing cultural identities and social responsibilities;
    8. Encourages the State Party, the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to find opportunities to share Fujisan’s practices with other extensive cultural landscapes that face similar conservation and management challenges;
    9. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2018, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 43rd session in 2019.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6704 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.40 Pyu Ancient Cities (Myanmar) (C 1444) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.28, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the State Party for the actions it has undertaken in response to the Committee's recommendations at the time of inscription to develop and implement, as soon as possible, a conservation plan for the burial sites, allied to capacity-building in the conservation of these particularly fragile and vulnerable sites;
    4. Requests the State Party in order to complement the Management Plan, to develop a risk preparedness strategy, a tourism management strategy/plan to prepare for an increase in visitors, and to add key priorities and an action plan that addresses ways to improve the living standards of local villages, and to manage an increased numbers of pilgrims;
    5. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6705 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.41 Kathmandu Valley (Nepal) (C121bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.69, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Acknowledges the efforts of the Department of Archaeology, with the support of UNESCO and various donors and agencies, to respond to the effects of the April/May 2015 earthquakes;
    4. Notes that all seven monument zones have suffered extensive damage from the earthquakes of April-May 2015, which resulted in adverse impacts on attributes, authenticity, integrity and management of the property and put its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) at risk;
    5. Also notes that earthquakes are a regular feature of the Kathmandu Valley, and that the “cyclical renewal” carried out by craftspeople, using traditional processes and materials, has sustained the heritage values of the property over time;
    6. Considers that a renewal process could help restore some of the attributes affected by the earthquake, thereby reducing the impact on the OUV, but emphasizes that this work must be based on a review and analysis of precisely what has been damaged and could be recovered, of what has been lost and will need to be replaced by new structures, as well as on a clear understanding of the attributes of OUV for each monument zone and how each has been impacted;
    7. Urges the State Party to develop, in full engagement with local community groups, including traditional Guthis and others, a carefully-designed Recovery Master Plan (RMP) supported by guidelines to identify what attributes of OUV can be recovered, how choices are justified, and how the recovery work will be phased and undertaken. The RMP should facilitate the appropriate use, management and maintenance of the sites, in accordance with the OUV of the property and with other local and national values;
    8. Also urges the State Party to integrate the RMP within an overall socio-economic revitalisation programme for urban communities, to encourage residents and local businesses to engage in the recovery process and to ensure that it delivers wide-ranging social and economic benefits;
    9. Requests the State Party to review the Integrated Management Plan (IMP) for the property, taking into consideration the damage caused by the earthquakes, its impact on the OUV of the property and the provisions of the RMP, and to prepare a plan of action to build capacity through coordination of local and international expertise, training programmes for both heritage principles and master crafts and a scheme to foster long-term sustainability through the provision of reasonable remuneration and long-term employment;
    10. Takes note of the report provided by the 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission and also requests the State Party to implement all its detailed recommendations as appropriate;
    11. Notes with concern the need for a coherent, consistent and coordinated approach by national institutions for adequate response from the State Party in pursuing recovery and reconstruction of the heritage property;
    12. Further notes the dimensions of the recovery task and the potential for the property to be subject to considerable pressure to rebuild within the monument and buffer zones using new approaches and technologies, and to use contractors with inadequate experience and familiarity with traditional materials and local processes, all of which could have considerable adverse impacts on the OUV of the property;
    13. Taking into account all of the above-mentioned potential threats and the ascertained threats to the property’s OUV caused by the immediate impacts of the 2015 earthquakes, further requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/ICCROM Reactive Monitoring mission to further define corrective measures and to ascertain the progress accomplished by the State Party;
    14. Calls on the international community to continue providing support for both the short-term protection and emergency safeguarding measures and the long-term conservation of the property, which are both necessary to maintain the OUV of the Kathmandu Valley;
    15. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, before any irreversible decision is made, detailed information about any major restoration, rehabilitation or reconstruction works foreseen within and in the vicinity of the property, for review by the Advisory Bodies in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
    16. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the absence of significant progress, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6706 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.42 Lumbini, the Birthplace of the Lord Buddha (Nepal) (C 666rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.18, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Notes the progress made in finalizing the Integrated Management framework document, but regrets the delay in its adoption;
    4. Also notes that development activities have been undertaken before the adoption of the management plan and without conducting Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs);
    5. Urges the State Party to adopt and implement the Integrated Management framework document as a matter of priority, and to carry out HIAs, with a specific section focusing on the potential impact of the project on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), in conformity with the 2011 ICOMOS Guidelines on HIAs for World Heritage Cultural Properties, for the proposed projects, before undertaking any new work within the property or in the adjacent areas identified as having potential archaeological significance;
    6. Takes note of the State Party’ strategy with the international community to utilize the property to develop a Lumbini World Peace City, but expresses its concern with the project’s potential impact on the property and its current use and therefore, requests the State Party to provide details on the proposed project and to carry out a HIA, with a specific section focusing on its potential impact on the OUV of the property, in conformity with the ICOMOS Guidelines on HIAs for World Heritage Cultural Properties, before the project proposal is approved;
    7. Encourages the State Party to develop a strategy for the protection of the larger Greater Lumbini Area and its wider setting, including but not limited to Tilaurakot and Ramagrama, and to further reduce industrial activity in the vicinity of the property;
    8. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6707 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.43 Fort and Shalamar Gardens in Lahore (Pakistan) (C 171) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM7B.19, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Notes the efforts made by the State Party to address the conservation of the property and the steps taken to revise the conservation plan, including the revitalisation of the training institute, although no further details as to the organigram and timeline for its establishment have been provided;
    4. Also notes that, to date, the State Party has not formally submitted a proposal for a minor boundary modification, which would include an enlarged buffer zone for the property as well as the adopted regulatory measures;
    5. Expresses its serious concern about the development of the Orange Line Metro and requests the State Party to prepare a visual impact study of the project to be presented to the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies before pursuing the works of the Orange Line Metro associated with the Shalamar Gardens;
    6. Reminds the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, technical details, including Heritage Impact Assessments (HIA), for all proposed projects that may have an impact on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property prior to their approval, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    7. Requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property at its earliest convenience, to examine the Orange Line Metro project and to discuss the same with the relevant Government authorities and to review the management and protection arrangements of the property;
    8. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017 an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering whether there is an ascertained or potential danger to the Outstanding Universal Value of the property.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6708 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.44 Historical Monuments at Makli, Thatta (Pakistan) (C 143) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.70, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Regrets that the State Party has not submitted a state of conservation report, as requested by the World Heritage Committee;
    4. Expresses its concern that only few of the recommendations made by the Reactive Monitoring missions of 2006 and 2012 have been implemented so far, including structural monitoring and soil investigation for the Jam Nizzamuddin Mausoleum and its emergency stabilisation work;
    5. Also expresses its deep concern at the severely deteriorated state of conservation of the property, noting that encroachment, vandalism, and deteriorated monuments are affecting its integrity and pose significant threats to its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
    6. Endorses the recommendations made by the 2016 Reactive Monitoring mission in order to address the pressing issues of site management and monument conservation at the property, and requests the State Party to fully implement, as a matter of urgency, these recommendations, and particularly:
      1. to establish a regular trash removal system and remove the graffiti,
      2. to establish regular inspections of the property, including overnight, in order to prevent inappropriate uses and unsanctioned vehicular access, and to record and report on all activities on site,
      3. to complete the remaining stretch of the barrier wall marking the boundaries of the World Heritage property;
    7. Also requests the State Party to:
      1. Install, as a matter of urgency, at least 3 weather stations within the property (one of each monument group of the Samma, Akhund/Tarkhan, and Mughal periods),
      2. Install crack monitors on cracks that cause structural concerns in the principal monuments. All locations should be photographed before and after the installation of the monitor and a regimen of monitoring should be implemented, beginning aggressively (every three months) and slowing down (to annual monitoring) if no change is recorded. If change is noted, more frequent (monthly) monitoring should be undertaken,
      3. Undertake a soil investigation/geo-physical survey on the surroundings of the Mausolem of Jam Nizzamuddin, on the basis of which an intervention plan should be elaborated, also using data from crack monitors,
      4. Stabilize all the elements that are about to fall, including Jamia Majid, Jam Nizzamuddin and a number of other monument groups. Prior to commencing work on each monument, the State Party should develop:
        1. detailed condition mapping and documentation,
        2. a characterization of original building fabric (e.g. stone and brick masonry, mortar, plaster, tile and glaze),
        3. a history of interventions to understand the series of subsequent work on each building and how these may affect the development of successful interventions,
        4. a list of compatible intervention materials, which must be informed by analysis of original fabric mentioned above,
        5. specifications for interventions that include instructions for fabrication of intervention materials and their application and implementation,
        6. a monitoring and maintenance plan to be implemented once the interventions are complete,
      5. Establish a procedure to document fallen original fabric and store it carefully in appropriate storehouses. This procedure should include the following steps:
        1. photograph materials as found in situ,
        2. label and photograph individual elements,
        3. store materials in a dedicated storehouse/magazine,
        4. create and maintain an inventory of all collected items,
      6. Document, as a matter of emergency, the existing architectural surface decoration—such as the remaining glazed tiles—which constitute an important part of the attributes of OUV, yet are for the most part already lost, and establish a condition report to be accompanied of damage assessment,
      7. Resume the conservation work at the Sultan Ibrahim mausoleum, taking into account its critical state both at the structural and surface level, especially with regard to the domes and architectural surface decoration,
      8. Immediately establish a Management Plan, including a systematic monitoring system and a plan for capacity building of the staff of the Government of Sindh’s Department of Archaeology, without waiting for the finalization of the Master Plan;
    8. Further requests the State Party to finalize the Master Plan for the property and to submit it to the World Heritage Centre by 1 February 2017, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    9. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the case of confirmation of the ascertained or potential danger to the Outstanding Universal Value, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6709 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.45 Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras (Philippines) (C 722) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.20, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the considerable efforts and progress made by the State Party to finalize the Rice Terraces Master Plan 2015-2024, which ensures an overall consistency between the main planning tool and the different provisions that are being adopted through legal processes at the national and provincial levels, such as bills and ordinances;
    4. Encourages the State Party to continue implementing the Rice Terraces Master Plan 2015-2024, including not only the tangible conservation of the property, but also the Ifugao practices and intangible cultural heritage associated with it;
    5. Requests the State Party to ensure the necessary human and financial resources to support the implementation of the Master Plan of the property through operational arrangements;
    6. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6710 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.46 Golden Temple of Dambulla (Sri Lanka) (C 561) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.22, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Takes note of the results of the March 2015 ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, and requests the State Party to implement the recommendations of the mission as appropriate;
    4. Expresses its serious concern about the lack of clear management structures and clear lines of responsibilities, and in particular the lack of implementation of the Management Plan which increases the problematic of conservation and pilgrim/visitor management of the property, and therefore strongly urges the State Party to:
      1. Establish a site management committee as a matter of priority, including representatives of the government, Temple authorities and the local community, as well as experts,
      2. Revise and update the Management Plan based on clearly defined governance and communication structures while incorporating traditional management systems, that sets out the interface between the State and Temple authorities, setting short-, mid- and long-term strategies for both conservation and pilgrim/visitor management, as well as budget planning, and to provide the draft to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies,
      3. Develop a Conservation Strategy, as part of the revised Management Plan, to address the conservation needs, develop a pilgrim/visitor Management Strategy to control the number of pilgrims/visitors allowed into each cave, as well as a policy prohibiting flash photography within the caves;
    5. Encourages the State Party, in collaboration with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, to request technical assistance, if necessary, to support the conservation of stone and wall paintings;
    6. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6711 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.47 Old Town of Galle and its Fortifications (Sri Lanka) (C 451) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM7B.21, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Acknowledges the information provided by the State Party concerning the Galle Harbour project and welcomes the significant scaling back of the project;
    4. Taking note of the findings of the Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA), supports its recommendations and requests the State Party to:
      1. Provide assurances that the recommendations will be considered, in order to limit the potential impact of the development on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property,
      2. Make available detailed plans for the port development as soon as possible,
      3. Appoint a marine archaeologist at an early stage during the development, who shall closely observe the impacts of the project and initiate mitigating measures if necessary;
    5. Notes the information provided on the Integrated Management System and recommends that the State Party:
      1. Consider the need to make further legislative changes to ensure its functioning,
      2. Provide a clear timetable for the implementation of the Management Plan,
      3. Strengthen the management capacity of the Galle Heritage Foundation,
      4. Establish a clear, long-term funding strategy which includes sufficient funds for the maintenance of the property,
      5. Develop a tourism strategy to promote and protect the cultural values of the property and ensure sustainable benefits for the local community, especially from the Port project;
    6. Acknowledges that the State Party has invited an ICOMOS Advisory mission concurrent to the 40th session of the World Heritage Committee in order to consider the plans for the Port project prior to its adoption, and to examine the overall state of conservation of the property, and also requests the State Party, to provide large-scale plans and high-resolution, photo montages of the port project for examination by the Advisory mission;
    7. Takes note of the expiry of the funding timeline for the project in May 2017 and also strongly urges the State Party not to start the Port Project until the findings of the ICOMOS Advisory mission have been considered by the World Heritage Centre;
    8. Further requests the Director of the World Heritage Centre, in consultation with the Chairperson of the World Heritage Committee, to officially determine whether it is appropriate for the Port Project to proceed having regard to the findings of the mission and in compliance with all Committee Decisions related to the Port Project;
    9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6712 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.48 Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz (Uzbekistan) (C 885) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.74, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Regrets that the State Party has not responded to the concerns, recommendations and requests formulated in previous Committee Decisions; that it has not provided detailed plans and documentation or Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs) of the “State Programme for complex measures for building and reconstruction of Shakhrisyabz city”; and that it has failed to halt works until the necessary assessments and reviews have been carried out;
    4. Takes note with deep concern of the report provided by the 2016 joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission, which observed that major interventions had been carried out to date in the framework of the State Programme, including the demolition and re-building activities that have brought about irreversible changes to the original appearance of large area within the historic centre of Shakhrisyabz, the setting of the architectural monuments and the overall historical town planning structure and layers;
    5. Also expresses its deep concern that the State Party has not complied with the requests expressed by the Committee in Decision 39 COM 7B.74, and that the aforementioned interventions already represent a threat to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, notably its integrity and authenticity, in accordance with Paragraph 179 (b) of the Operational Guidelines;
    6. Decides to inscribe the Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz (Uzbekistan) on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    7. Urges the State Party to immediately suspend all tourism development and reconstruction projects within the property and in the adjacent areas, and requests, as a matter of priority, the State Party to:
      1. Immediately halt all demolition of traditional housing areas, pending the development of Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs), the elaboration and finalisation of appropriate conservation policies/guidelines and of the Management Plan, and the detailed review of large-scale urban planning schemes for Shakhrisyabz,
      2. Provide detailed documentation of the demolition and other works undertaken under the “Tourism Development and Reconstruction” projects,
      3. Reinforce national laws and regulations on the protection of cultural heritage, with a specific focus on World Heritage properties in Uzbekistan, and adopt bylaws/regulations to support the implementation of the Convention at national level,
      4. Reinforce the heritage protection and management system by establishing a special agency responsible for the protection and management of World Heritage property, and providing it with adequate human and financial resources;
    8. Also requests the State Party to invite, as a matter of urgency, a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property in order to identify the precise threats to the OUV of the property, in collaboration with key national and international stakeholders, and to determine whether corrective measures and a Desired state of conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger (DSOCR) can be defined, or whether the works undertaken so far have so irreversibly damaged the attributes that sustain the OUV of the property, notably its authenticity and integrity, that the property can no longer convey the OUV for which it was inscribed and should therefore be considered for possible deletion from the World Heritage List at a later session;
    9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6713 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.49 Historic Centre of Vienna (Austria) (C 1033) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.94, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Also recalling the concerns expressed by the 2012 mission regarding the critical level of urban development reached since inscription and its cumulative impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, and the need for new tools to orient the development process towards sustainable development that protects the attributes of the OUV,
    4. Noting the information provided by the State Party about the stage of implementation of the proposed Vienna Ice-Skating Club – Intercontinental Hotel – Vienna Konzerthaus project,
    5. Expresses its concern that the High-Rise Concept abolishes exclusion zones for high-rises in the Vienna urban areas, without having applied appropriate instruments of control for height, volume and urban density, which respect the OUV of the property; and that the Glacis Master Plan permits the construction of buildings of a scale that would have an adverse impact on the urban form and character of the Glacis area;
    6. Notes the recommendations of the 2015 mission to the property and requests the State Party to implement its recommendations and in particular aligning the use of the existing tools with the protection of the property’s OUV, including authenticity and integrity, as laid out in the Management Plan and associated legal instruments such as local Decrees on protected urban areas (ensembles, buffer zone etc.) and guidelines on urban development;
    7. Also requests the State Party to facilitate the preparation of revised planning rules and guidelines which:
      1. Establish parameters for the urban density as well as specific standards for building height and volume for the property and buffer zone,
      2. Safeguard the urban morphology that is an essential attribute of the property,
      3. Encourage sustainable development in the property and its buffer zone in harmony with its OUV,
      4. Require that all high-rise projects are evaluated through a comprehensive Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA), prepared in accordance with the ICOMOS 2011 Guidance on HIAs for Cultural World Heritage properties, including reference to 3D visual simulations, so that the effects of the proposed development on the OUV of the property can be properly considered;
    8. Urges the State Party to halt any further approvals for high-rise projects, pending the preparation of the revised planning rules, and submit the proposed designs and related HIAs for any future high-rise projects to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
    9. While noting the State Party’s decision not to pursue the land use planning procedures for the proposed Vienna Ice-Skating Club – Intercontinental Hotel – Vienna Konzerthaus project, nevertheless expresses its concern that the proposed project remains inconsistent with the recommendations of the 2012 mission and would adversely affect the OUV of the property, if implemented in its current form, and also urges the State Party to facilitate a major revision of this project design to:
      1. Reduce the height of the proposed building to comply with the recommendations of the 2012 mission report,
      2. Take into account scale and massing in relation to the characteristics of the location and the OUV of the property,
      3. Harmonize the project design with the attributes of the specific location, which is an integral part of the property,
      4. Reduce the visual impact of the proposed building on both the close urban context and views of the Historic Centre of Vienna;
    10. Further requests the State Party to submit the revised design to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies before any decisions are made regarding its implementation, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
    11. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the case of confirmation of the ascertained or potential danger to Outstanding Universal Value, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6714 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.50 Old City of Dubrovnik (Croatia) (C 95bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 22 COM VII.17 and 38 COM 7B.25, adopted at its 22nd (Kyoto, 1998) and 38th (Doha 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Expresses its concern regarding inappropriate conservation works of all parts of the City Walls and requests the State Party to implement all relevant measures, including repairs of damage and development of guidelines on best conservation practices, to prevent any threat to the structural stability of the City Walls, and to ensure strict and regular monitoring;
    4. Endorses the recommendations of the 2015 joint UNESCO/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property and also requests the State Party to give the highest priority to the implementation of its recommendations, notably to:
      1. Develop and submit to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies the Management Plan of the property, including a tourism strategy, legal regulations for cruise ship tourism, identification of the sustainable carrying capacity of the city, a risk-preparedness action plan and an interpretation strategy,
      2. Not to proceed with the Bosanka 2 project, nor to construct the Lazeretto; Quay/Landing Stage with connection to the Old Port,
      3. Submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a minor boundary modification proposal with a view to expanding the buffer zone as recommended by the mission,
      4. Finalize and submit the retrospective Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (SOUV) for the property to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
    5. Taking note of the current status of the Sports and Recreation Centre with a Golf Course and the Bosanka North and Bosanka South Tourist Resorts project planned for the plateau of Mount Srđ and Bosanka in the vicinity of the property, considers that the Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) demonstrates that, subject to design refinement, the proposed Sports and Recreation Centre with a Golf Course and the Bosanka North and Bosanka South Tourist Resorts would have an acceptable effect on the OUV of the property, and further requests the State Party to:
      1. Facilitate revisions to the plans and drawings for the project to ensure that no construction is to take place within a minimum distance of 50m from the edges of the plateau,
      2. Continue the dialogue with the Advisory Bodies as the Resorts project progresses,
      3. Submit amended plans for the project to the World Heritage Centre in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, for review by the Advisory Bodies before construction works begin,
      4. Submit relevant documentation, including HIAs, to the World Heritage Centre, in line with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, before any final decisions are made or any works start, for major developments projects within the property, its buffer zone and setting;
    6. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6715 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.51 Carolingian Westwork and Civitas Corvey (Germany) (C 1447) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.33, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the State Party for the actions undertaken in response to the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations at the time of inscription to complete the additional planned measures of the Management Plan and the additional archaeological investigations measures;
    4. Encourages the State Party to set up the Steering Committee envisaged by the Management Plan, involving the offices and stakeholders that worked to develop the management and Master Plans;
    5. Regretting that the wind farm project in Beverungen has been authorized despite concerns from the authorities regarding the visual impact on the property, requests the State Party to undertake Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs) in conformity with the ICOMOS Guidelines on Heritage Impact Assessments for Cultural World Heritage Properties, with a specific section focusing on the potential impact of the project on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), for the wind farm projects in both Fürstenau and Beverungen, in order to prevent any irreversible transformations and potential threats to the property’s OUV;
    6. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6716 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.52 Venice and its lagoon (Italy) (C 394) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.27, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Expresses its extreme concern that the combination of previous developments, ongoing transformations and proposed projects within the property which are threatening serious deterioration of the eco and cultural systems of the Lagoon and irreversible changes to the overall relationship between the City and its Lagoon, as well as the loss of architectural and town-planning coherence of the historic city, all of which would lead to substantive and irreversible loss of authenticity and integrity;
    4. Considers that the property requires an immediate improvement to the planning tools available through the creation of:
      1. an integrated strategy for all on-going and planned developments within the property,
      2. a three-dimensional morphological model and
      3. a sustainable tourism strategy,
        all of which should be reflected in an updated Management Plan for the property; this revised planning approach should also be founded on a shared vision of authorities and stakeholders which affords priority to sustaining the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property and its landscape and seascape setting;
    5. Reiterates its request to the State Party to enforce speed limits and regulate the number and type of boats in the Lagoon and in the canals;
    6. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to adopt, as a matter of urgency, a legal document introducing prohibition of the largest ships and tankers to enter the Lagoon and requests the State Party to put in place all necessary strategic, planning and management frameworks to this end;
    7. Also requests the State Party to halt all new projects within the property, prior to the mid-term assessment of the Management Plan, and the submission of details of proposed developments, together with Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs) and Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), to the World Heritage Centre, in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    8. Endorses the recommendations of the 2015 mission and further requests the State Party to fully implement these recommendations;
    9. Requests furthermore the State Party to revise the proposed buffer zone for the property in line with the ICOMOS technical review and submit it to the World Heritage Centre as a minor boundary modification, by 1 December 2016, for examination by the Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
    10. Finally requests that the State Party implement all urgent measures highlighted in the mission report and submit to the World Heritage Committee a detailed report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, by 1 February 2017 for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view, if no substantial progress is accomplished by the State Party until then, to consider inscribing the property on the List of the World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6717 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.53 Curonian Spit (Lithuania / Russian Federation) (C 994) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions36 COM 7B.78 and 38 COM 7B.28, adopted at its 36th (Saint-Petersburg, 2012), and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Welcomes the continuing collaboration between the two States Parties and the management of the two national parks and the commitment to produce a trans-boundary Management Plan for the property, as well as the strengthened forest governance, protection and management within the Lithuanian National Park;
    4. Taking note of the Reactive Monitoring mission, which took place to the property in January 2015, notes that the Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal (LNGT) project outside Klaipėda does not cause an adverse impact to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property and requests the State Party of Lithuania to ensure that in the future relevant documentation for all major projects that may affect the property are submitted to the World Heritage Centre in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
    5. Also notes that there is currently no proposal for the construction of a suspension bridge from Klaipėda across the lagoon to the Spit;
    6. Further notes that the development of a deep sea port and/or a deep sea outer port at Klaipėda could cause an adverse impact to the OUV of the property, arising from both visual impacts and possible changes to sea currents and the stability of the dunes on the Spit and therefore also requests the State Party of Lithuania to ensure that no final decision is made and no work proceeds on the development of a deep sea port and/or a deep sea outer port at Klaipėda until all relevant documentation, including the results of forthcoming Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs), have been be submitted to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, in order to allow an evaluation of potential impact on the property;
    7. Further requests that both States Parties expedite the completion of the Management Plan for the entire property, inclusive of the Lithuanian and the Russian domains including:
      1. a system of inter-institutional and international (trans-boundary) cooperation,
      2. a capacity development strategy for national park administrations and municipality staff,
      3. guidelines and prescriptive conditions concerning future port development,
      4. provision for preparation of HIAs which accord with the 2011 ICOMOS Guidance on Heritage Impact Assessments for Cultural World Heritage Properties, with a specific section focusing on their potential impact on the OUV, for all major projects within the property, and
      5. coverage of other relevant matters raised in reports from the 2010 Reactive Monitoring mission, 2013 Advisory mission and 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission, including (but not limited to):
        1. a policy to prohibit or severely limit construction on the shores or fore-dunes to preserve the unique landscape of the dunes bordering the Baltic Sea and the shore of the Curonian lagoon,
        2. programmes to address conflicting perceptions between the national parks and the municipalities so that there is common commitment to conservation of the OUV of the property,
        3. identification of buffer zones,
        4. continued attention to housing problems and illegal development in the Lithuanian domain of the property, and
        5. an education and information strategy oriented to the local community and other stakeholders;
    8. Finally requests the States Parties of Lithuania and the Russian Federation to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated joint report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6718 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.54 Natural and Culturo-Historical Region of Kotor (Montenegro) (C 125ter) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.29, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the progress made by the State Party in strengthening the legal, planning and management framework of the property;
    4. Strongly requests the State Party to proceed with promptly finalizing the appointment and enforcement of the Management Council with a clear mandate to ensure effective coordination in management;
    5. Also strongly requests the State Party to finalize the actions undertaken to respond to the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations, in particular to:
      1. Review and harmonize all planning instruments through a comprehensive Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA), based on the ICOMOS Guidance on HIAs for Cultural World Heritage Properties, so as to establish a clear planning / policy framework that is consistent with the need for protecting the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property and its attributes and promoting sustainable, equitable and compatible forms of development,
      2. Finalize the Study of protection of cultural properties for the Special Purpose Spatial Plan for the Coastal Area (SPSPCA), as a basis for defining land-use zoning and its related system of measures and detailed provisions, which should be founded on the OUV of the property and the characteristics of its landscape, and incorporate them into all other plans,
      3. Finalize the HIAs for the Verige Bridge and for any alternative options to it as a basis for developing the Regional Transport Strategy,
      4. Conclude and adopt the Spatial Urban Plan for the Municipality of Kotor, in coherence with the objectives, zoning and provisions that will be elaborated for the SPSPCA;
    6. Requests the State Party to undertake an independent HIA, in line with the ICOMOS Guidance on HIAs for Cultural World Heritage Properties, for the tourist facility at Glavati - Prčanj for which a Local Study of Location has been adopted, as well as for all planned, approved and begun development projects, in order to assess their impacts on the OUV of the property and its attributes;
    7. Reiterates its request to the State Party to submit the results of the above HIAs to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, prior to undertaking any further commitment;
    8. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6719 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.55 Auschwitz Birkenau German Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp (1940-1945) (Poland) (C 31) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 33 COM 7B.115, adopted at its 33rd session (Seville, 2009),
    3. Acknowledges the details provided by the State Party on the ongoing projects including progress made in the management of visitors including with advanced booking systems, the express route and the start of a restoration initiative of the barracks in Auschwitz;
    4. Welcomes the development of the detailed Conservation Strategy and urges the State Party to ensure that its Guidelines are followed;
    5. Whilst understanding that the proposed expressway and south ring road of Oświęcim have been approved in principle, subject to environmental decisions, reiterates its request to the State Party to undertake as soon as possible a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) of the overall project, and to submit this, together with details as to how this project relates to other proposed road schemes in Brzezinka and elsewhere, to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, before irreversible commitments are made;
    6. Also welcomes the start of the restoration project of the two brick prisoner barracks and requests the State Party to submit further details on the restoration principles at use with documentation in order that good practice be established for further application in other parts of the property;
    7. In light of the various transformations that are taking place to accommodate the nearly two million visitors arriving at the property each year, also requests the State Party to provide more information on how the various projects and necessary infrastructure will be provided in symbiosis with the surroundings of the property, in line with the Conservation Guidelines, while respecting the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
    8. Also reiterates it request that HIAs are undertaken for all projects before any decisions are taken, in order to define clearly potential impacts on the attributes of OUV;
    9. Notes with satisfaction that the Retrospective Statement of OUV of the property has been finalized and submitted to the World Heritage Committee for adoption (Document WHC/16/40.COM/8E);
    10. Considers that there is a need for a governance system that brings together all the stakeholders at the property and for a clearer multi-disciplinary management approach that is based on OUV, and further welcomes the suggestion of a programme to facilitate more positive relationships with the local community;
    11. In order to undertake a dialogue with the State Party on how best these issues might be addressed, further requests the State Party to invite an ICOMOS Advisory mission to the property;
    12. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6720 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.56 Cultural and Historic Ensemble of the Solovetsky Islands (Russian Federation) (C 632) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.32, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Notes the recommendations of the July 2015 ICOMOS Advisory mission to the property and requests the State Party to give high priority to the implementation of its recommendations;
    4. Acknowledges the positive steps taken by the State Party to address the decisions of the Committee, notably the revisions undertaken so far to the legislative and regulatory measures;
    5. Considers that the draft retrospective Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property should fully reflect the complexity of this property, its attributes and resources, namely the pilgrimage routes and monastic roads, and the complex irrigation systems with its lakes and visual axis, and its overall cultural landscape;
    6. Recalls its previous concerns regarding the inappropriate location of the Museum Complex and urges the State Party to immediately halt its construction, remove the parts already constructed, and consider a more appropriate design and location for the Museum, and to report progress to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2016, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    7. Also requests that the construction of the airport building be halted and the project reconsidered;
    8. Expresses its concern about the poor state of conservation of the monastic irrigation system, with its lakes and canals, pilgrimage routes and vernacular timber buildings, and the degree of rebuilding of monuments, and further requests the State Party to elaborate a Conservation plan for the overall property, to adequately plan and implement conservation measures, and meanwhile to refrain from reconstruction or conjectural rebuilding which threatens the authenticity of the property;
    9. Also urges the State Party to revise the Master Pan of the Solovetsky Archipelago, and the Development Plan so that they define the limits of development, and set parameters to ensure that land use and development reinforce the OUV of the property;
    10. Requests furthermore the State Party to revise the Management Plan so that it is based on the OUV and its attributes, and takes a cultural landscape approach, and to submit the revised plan to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    11. Invites the State Party to inform it, through the World Heritage Centre and in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, of any intention to undertake or authorize major restoration, conservation, and/or development projects which may affect the OUV of the property, as soon as possible and before making any decisions;
    12. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6721 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.57 Historic Centre of the City of Yaroslavl (Russian Federation) (C 1170) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.31, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Acknowledges the steps taken by the State Party to improve the protection of the property through strengthened legislation and regulations;
    4. Expresses its concern about the continuing inappropriate construction and infrastructure development projects within the property and its buffer zone, which threaten the authenticity and integrity of the property, and urges the State Party to:
      1. Further elaborate, as a matter of urgency, regulations and rules that take into consideration the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property and its buffer zone,
      2. Restrict land use and developments within the property, with particular emphasis on the establishment of no-construction zones and strict limits to development rights,
      3. Review and revise the Urban Master Plan, with attention to developments in the buffer zone and the zone of the Kotorosl river, in order to ensure visual integrity of the property;
    5. Recommends that the urban dimension of the property be fully reflected in the policies, measures and tools adopted to ensure the conservation of the latter; using if necessary the approach carried by the Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (2011);
    6. Encourages the State Party to commence a participatory process for the development of the management structure and to submit a Management Plan for the property to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    7. Also encourages the State Party to revise the current regulations allowing reconstruction of ruinous monuments and to develop a Conservation Strategy, in parallel with the Management Plan, to guide conservation measures and ensure an approach and methodology that is appropriate to the World Heritage values;
    8. Strongly reiterates its request to the State Party to submit, in conformity with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, details of any proposed developments, including those reported as still awaiting implementation, such as the new bypass road, bridges and traffic interchanges around the property, that may have an adverse impact on the OUV of the property, accompanied by Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs);
    9. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6722 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.58 Kizhi Pogost (Russian Federation) (C 544) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.30, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the State Party for the continuing excellent conservation and restoration works at the Church of the Transfiguration and requests the State Party to secure all necessary funding to complete these works ;
    4. Notes with concern that developments, such as the Museum entrance project, are being planned despite its previous request to the State Party to halt any developments within the property, its setting and the protected areas of the Kizhi Museum-Reserve, and reiterates its request to the State Party to explore possibilities to reuse existing buildings for Museum staff accommodation in order to significantly reduce new constructions;
    5. Reiterates that the control of development and fluvial regulation, as well as land-use, remain a substantial challenge and necessitate strict application of legal regulations and sensitive tourism development;
    6. Recommends that the Management Plan “Kizhi Pogost 2016-2026” be further developed and should focus on the establishment of sufficient protection measures both within and outside the buffer zone area;
    7. Notes that the restoration of the Church of the Transfiguration has entered a challenging period and also requests the State Party to:
      1. Ensure that the introduction of new strengthening systems be kept to a minimum and that traditional methods should be preferred,
      2. Re-establish every part of the Church, notably the beams of the heaven ceiling, to a state close to original in order to ensure the authenticity and integrity of the Church,
      3. Consider inviting a follow-up Advisory mission to assess progress made on the conservation measures and the finalization of the management plan;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6723 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.59 Pergamon and its Multi-Layered Cultural Landscape (Turkey) (C 1457) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.38, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the State Party for the actions it has undertaken in response to the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations at the time of inscription to complete the Management Plan for the property, to improve the monitoring system by specifying which organization is responsible for monitoring each indicator, including seismic monitoring, and on its implementation of new height limits to conserve the visual integrity of the property;
    4. Requests the State Party to finalize, as soon as possible, the study on the restriction of vehicles to the Acropolis and submit it to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    5. Notes the proposed Selinos Brook Amelioration Project and also requests the State Party to provide the World Heritage Centre with the survey and Heritage Impact Assessment for the project, with a specific section focusing on its potential impact on the Outstanding Universal Value, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    6. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6724 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.60 Diyarbakır Fortress and Hevsel Gardens Cultural Landscape (Turkey) (C 1488) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add.2,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 8B.32, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Expresses its concern over the situation prevailing in Diyarbakir;
    4. Acknowledges the steps taken by the State Party to protect the property and its buffer zone and underlines the importance of preventing any further damage to the property;
    5. Requests the State Party, as soon as the security situation allows, to carry out an assessment of the state of conservation of the property and submit the results to the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies for review;
    6. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6725 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.61 Kiev: Saint-Sophia Cathedral and Related Monastic Buildings, Kiev-Pechersk Lavra (Ukraine) (C 527 bis)

    The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.85, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Also recalling its concerns expressed every year since 2008 regarding the critical level of urban development reached since inscription and its cumulative impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, and the need for new tools to orient the development process towards sustainable development that protects the attributes of OUV;
    4. Also takes note of the efforts undertaken by the State Party which resulted in the demolition of two floors of the new building at Desyatynnyi lane 3-5 in the buffer zone of one of the components of the property, namely Saint-Sophia Cathedral and reiterates its request to the State Party to reduce the adverse effect of the high-rise building on Klovsky Descent by demolishing the already constructed levels to an appropriate scale;
    5. Notes with concern the Rehabilitation Activities Plan for the Monastery economic courtyard on the Far Caves of Kyiv-Pechersk Preserve and requests the State Party to immediately halt any ongoing or planned construction/reconstruction works and also reiterates its request to the State Party to submit relevant documentation, including Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs), to the World Heritage Centre, in line with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, before any final decisions are made or any works start on major development projects within the property, its buffer zone and setting;
    6. Reiterates its serious concern about the longstanding threats to the property, such as the lack of appropriate legal protection and planning mechanisms, as well as the unresolved issue of unauthorized constructions in the buffer zone and visual vicinity of the property and planned reconstruction works within the boundaries of the property, which have deleterious effects on its inherent characteristics and could impact adversely on the property’s OUV;
    7. Further takes note of the State Party’s efforts with the development of the Management Plan and also requests it to finalize the Management Plan, with the assistance of the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies if needed, and to submit the final version by 1 December 2016;
    8. Further requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess its current conditions, to discuss all sensitive issues regarding the protection of the historic urban landscape of the city of Kyiv, including reinforcement of the management system, and to assist with the finalization of the Management Plan, in line with the decisions of the World Heritage Committee and in accordance with the World Heritage Convention;
    9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the case of confirmation of the ascertained or potential danger to Outstanding Universal Value, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6726 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.62 Ancient City of Tauric Chersonese and its Chora (Ukraine) (C 1411) The World Heritage Committee,
    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 37 COM 8B.40, adopted at its 37th session (Phnom Penh, 2013),
    3. Also recalling the UNESCO Executive Board Decisions 197 EX/5(II) and 199 EX/5(I.E),
    4. Urges all parties currently associated with the state of conservation of the property to refrain from any action that would cause irreversible damages to the property and to fulfil their obligations under international law by taking all possible measures to protect the property;
    5. Reiterates its recommendations at the time of inscription, and more specifically its previous request to survey the wider chora landscape with the help of non-destructive remote sensing techniques and satellite images;
    6. Invites the World Heritage Centre to use remote sensing techniques to gather information on the state of conservation of the property;
    7. Requests the State Party to invite, as soon as the situation allows, a joint World Heritage Centre / Advisory Bodies Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess its state of conservation;
    8. Also reiterates its previous request to all States Parties to the World Heritage Convention to provide international cooperation to assist the World Heritage Centre in financing monitoring and survey activities.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6727 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.63 Ancient Maya City and Protected Tropical Forests of Calakmul, Campeche (Mexico) (C/N 1061bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.16, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the progress made by the State Party in responding to the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations;
    4. Also welcomes the ongoing establishment of a Development Wide Vision Programme for the Municipality of Calakmul 2013-2040 and encourages the State Party to refer to the Policy for the Integration of a Sustainable Development Perspective into the Processes of the World Heritage Convention, adopted at the 20th session of the General Assembly (UNESCO, 2015), to inform the further development of this strategic document, and requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre further information about the plans and actions envisaged therein;
    5. Strongly encourages the State Party to:
      1. Complete the updating and reinforcement of legal protection for the extended property as a mixed site, including through the ongoing revision of the zoning of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, in order to ensure that both the natural values and the cultural heritage and sites contained in the entire property are adequately protected,
      2. Submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, the draft proposal for the revision of the zoning of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, including maps,
      3. Finalize the revision of the General principles for collaboration between the National Institute for Anthropology and History (INAH) and the National Commission for Natural Protected Areas (CONANP), and the establishment of the World Heritage Technical Sub-Council within the Advisory Council of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve as a coordination instrument,
      4. Complete and approve the integrated Management Plan for the extended mixed property, which also includes a monitoring program for both cultural and natural attributes of the property, as well as risk management measures specifically addressing threats to these attributes, and submit its final draft to the World Heritage Centre for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    6. Reiterates its request to the State Party to consider in the future the revision of the boundaries of the property so as to include additional identified cultural sites that relate to Calakmul and improve the configuration of the buffer zone so as it provides an effective layer of additional protection to the property;
    7. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6728 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.64 Cliff of Bandiagara (Land of the Dogons) (Mali) (C/N 516) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.60, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the efforts and committment of the State Party in the conservation and preservation of the property, at a time of great instability;
    4. Welcomes the measures taken by the State Party to prevent illegal excavation and illicit trafficking of local cultural artefacts, particularly in the site of Bidi, and urges the State Party to take all necessary measures to enhance the protection and monitoring of vulnerable sites;
    5. Also urges the State Party to continue the collaboration with the local communities to raise awareness of the value of local cultural artefacts to the property and to ensure that the different stakeholders participate in the maintenance and monitoring of this heritage;
    6. Appeals to all States Parties to ratify and implement the 1970 Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property to support Mali in the fight against illicit trafficking;
    7. Requests the State Party to commence the process for the updating of the management and conservation plan with the active participation of all stakeholder to include measures to support sustainable livelihoods, and to identify financial support for its implementation, and to submit the draft revised plan to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies;
    8. Also requests the State Party to invite, when circumstances allow, a joint UNESCO/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to review the overall management of the property, and particularly ways to reinforce traditional practices and diversify sustainable development opportunities for local communities;
    9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an interim report on the state of conservation and by 1 December 2017 an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6729 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.65 Wadi Rum Protected Area (Jordan) (C/N 1377)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.56, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Notes with appreciation the progress made by the State Party in addressing the recommendations made by the 2014 Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, particularly in the context of the region’s sensitive political and security conditions;
  • Welcomes the State Party’s intention to keep the World Heritage Centre informed about progress with the development of a waste water treatment plant for the Rum village, in order to ensure maximum compliance with applicable guidelines and standards;
  • Urges the State Party to complete, as a matter of priority, the full and permanent resolution of the issue of illegal tourist camps and other camp-like installations within the property, and to rehabilitate any areas that may have been degraded;
  • Reiterates its request to integrate the cultural heritage database currently under development with any existing natural heritage data into one compatible GIS (Geographic Information System) database, which includes both cultural and natural data, in order to support and facilitate the integrated monitoring and management of the cultural and natural attributes of the property;
  • Also reiterates its request to the State Party to ensure that the revised Management Plan provides legal measures and policies, backed by the necessary staff and financial resources, to enable effective management of the property and its buffer zone, including the regulation of development activities, visitor management, and tourism infrastructure and facilities, including vehicle route control within the property;
  • Strongly encourages the State Party to harness the work achieved by national and international research institutions in the management system for the property;
  • Requests the State Party to pursue the full implemention of all recommendations of the 2014 mission;
  • Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6730 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.66 Tasmanian Wilderness (Australia) (C/N 181quinquies)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
  • Recalling Decisions 38 COM 847 and 39 COM 7B.35, adopted at its 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
  • Commends the State Party for its commitment to explicitly rule out all forms of commercial logging and mining in the whole of the property, as well as its other commitments made in response to the recommendations of the 2015 joint IUCN/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission, and requests the State Party to implement all of the mission’s recommendations;
  • Welcomes the State Party’s commitment to include additional and strict assessment criteria to ensure that commercial tourism proposals do not impact negatively on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), and notes that a separate Tourism Master Plan will be elaborated in order to refine the balance between legitimate tourism development and conservation of cultural and natural attributes, based on consultation and negotiation with relevant stakeholders, including the Tasmanian Aboriginal Community;
  • Notes the information provided by the State Party with regard to the recent fires which affected the property, and also requests the State Party to ensure that fire research and management are fully reflected in the revision of the draft Management Plan for the property, including through the evaluation of recent experiences with fire response and taking into account the conclusions and recommendations made by the independent review of the management of the Tasmanian fires of January 2016;
  • Encourages the State Party to explore the possibility of dual naming for the property, to reflect its wilderness character, its Aboriginal heritage and the relationship of the Tasmanian Aboriginal Community with the property;
  • Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by mid-2017, a synthesis report of all available information on cultural sites of the property and a detailed plan for the comprehensive cultural survey, as recommended by the mission, and, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6731 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.67 Trang An Landscape Complex (Viet Nam) (C/N 1438)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.14 adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Warmly welcomes the progress made by the State Party in addressing the concerns raised by the Committee regarding the boundaries of the property, as well as the State Party’s initiative to host an international workshop on the revised management plan of the property, which was attended by representatives from ICOMOS and IUCN;
  • Acknowledges the cooperative agreement signed with two United Kingdom-based universities for a comprehensive 5-year programme (2015 to 2020) of archaeological and palaeo-environmental research;
  • Notes with significant concern that the State Party has not included adequate measures in the revised management plan concerning the management of tourism and cultural heritage, and requests the State Party to:
    1. Ensure measures are in place to limit overcrowding, including the establishment of a clearly justified maximum daily quota for peak and normal visitation days,
    2. Include sections concerning the archaeological heritage, which clearly detail the actions to be undertaken, in terms of staff training, conservation/restoration methods, and long-term planning,
    3. Develop the skills of the management body to successfully plan the management of the archaeological heritage at the property,
    4. Establish a system for the cataloguing, condition-surveying, monitoring and protection of archaeological heritage through conservation measures, in order to adequately conserve archaeological artefacts;
  • Also requests the State Party to undertake an assessment of the facilities and services required to adequately service the anticipated increase in visitation from one to two million visitors, including the extrapolated festival-day peaks of up to 50,000;
  • Further requests the State Party to clarify whether or not any additional recreational activities are to be encouraged, where they will be permitted, what facilities will be provided and identify the potential impacts on OUV and how they will be addressed;
  • Also notes with concern that the revised Management Plan refers to a new urban university area in Bai Dinh, which would result in a population growth of 20,000 people within the buffer zone by 2030, and requests furthermore the State Party to:
    1. Submit, in accordance with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines, detailed information on any proposed development projects within the property, its buffer zone and setting for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies prior to any decisions being taken that could be difficult to reverse,
    2. Undertake a Strategic Environmental Assessment for development of the buffer zone, taking into account potential impacts on the OUV of the property in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment and a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) in conformity with the ICOMOS Guidelines on HIAs for Cultural World Heritage properties for the proposed projects, prior to allowing any such development to take place;
  • Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6732 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.68 Natural and Cultural Heritage of the Ohrid region (the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) (C/N 99ter)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.58, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Welcomes the actions undertaken by the State Party concerning the revision of the project for the Instauration of St. Clement’s University at Plaoshnik to reduce its negative impacts on the property;
  • Notes with concern that a number of large-scale infrastructure projects have been proposed within the property and that the conclusions of the impact assessments of the proposed Galičica Ski Centre, the A3 road, the Railway corridor VIII and Highway A2 demonstrate that these projects would be likely to cause significant potential impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, and considers that these projects appear to represent a potential danger to the property, in line with paragraphs 179 and 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
  • Requests the State Party, as a matter of urgency, to prepare an overall Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) that assess comprehensively the potential cumulative impacts of all proposed infrastructure plans and other major projects on the property’s OUV, with a view to identifying alternative routes and locations for these major projects that do not impact on the OUV, and to submit them to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, before any further work is undertaken;
  • Also requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property in 2016 to assess its state of conservation and to provide technical advice to the State Party with regards to the development of the above-mentioned SEA and HIA;
  • Also welcomes the participatory approach to the revisions of the Management Plan for the property but strongly encourages the State Party to:
    1. Finalize the Management Plan for the property, and the Integrated Protection Plan for the Old Town Nucleus of Ohrid, and submit an electronic and three printed copies of the revised Management Plan to the World Heritage Centre, for review by the Advisory Bodies, prior to the above-mentioned Reactive Monitoring Mission,
    2. Finalize the detailed urban plans for each of the 19 complexes which are part of the monumental ensemble, in line with the existing regulatory framework, to ensure the enforcement of provisions and the control of activities that might impact the OUV of the property,
    3. Strictly enforce legal and regulatory provisions, and establish, as a matter of urgency, the foreseen Commission to coordinate natural and cultural heritage activities, as a management structure to control development pressures and interventions at the property,
    4. Develop a comprehensive action plan for the lakeshore to provide adequate guidance on the type and extent of potential developments in relation to the attributes of OUV of the property and its setting;
  • Also encourages the States Parties of Albania and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, with the support of the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, to continue to cooperate in the framework of the Upstream Process towards the preparation of a transboundary extension of the property to possibly include the Albanian part of Lake Ohrid, in order to strengthen the values and integrity of the property;
  • Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a report on the state of conservation of the property and on the steps taken to implement the above recommendations, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the case of confirmation of the ascertained or potential danger to OUV, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6733 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.69 Iguazu National Park (Argentina) (N 303) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.31, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the information regarding the ongoing cooperation on the ground between Iguazú National Park (Argentina) and the contiguous Iguaçu National Park (Brazil);
    4. Also welcomes the signature of the letter of intent between Administración de Parques Nacionales de Argentina, ICMBio, the Iguaçu National Park in Brazil and the Iguazú National Park in Argentina, on 7 June 2016, that confirmed the resolve of the parties to strengthen their collaborative efforts and to examine modalities of improving cooperation between the two National Parks;
    5. Noting that within the legal and institutional systems in each country, options for a formal high-level agreement might be limited, requests the States Parties of Argentina and Brazil to develop a roadmap for formalizing transboundary cooperation, including options for formal agreements at different levels and other mechanisms, and to submit it, by 1 December 2017, to the World Heritage Centre;
    6. Encourages the State Party to continue its efforts to monitor key species and to increase its cooperation in this regard with the State Party of Brazil;
    7. Notes with concern the information provided by the State Party regarding the extension of the National Route 101 and also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN, detailed information on this project, and to ensure that activities associated with the road extension are not permitted to proceed until an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been undertaken, including an assessment of the impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property and the OUV of the contiguous property of Iguaçu National Park in Brazil, in accordance with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and has been reviewed by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6734 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.70 Iguaçu National Park (Brazil) (N 355) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.82, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the information provided by the State Party that cooperation on the ground between Iguaçu National Park and the contiguous Iguazú National Park in Argentina has been ongoing;
    4. Also welcomes the signature of the letter of intent between Administración de Parques Nacionales de Argentina, ICMBio, the Iguaçu National Park in Brazil and the Iguazú National Park in Argentina, on 7 June 2016, that confirmed the resolve of the parties to strengthen their collaborative efforts and to examine modalities of improving cooperation between the two National Parks;
    5. Further welcomes the confirmation that the management plan for the property is currently being revised and requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN, an electronic and three printed copies of the revised management plan;
    6. Notes with appreciation that the Colono Road remains closed, that the approval in the Senate of Bill 61/2013, which would provide a legal basis for the reopening of the road, is considered unlikely and that, in case any Bill regarding the reopening of the road is positively voted on by the Senate, it can be still vetoed by the President of the Republic;
    7. Recalling that the illegal opening of the road in 1997 led the Committee to inscribe the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger, notes the conclusions of the 2015 IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission that the reopening of the Colono Road would represent a clear ascertained danger to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) and the integrity of the property, and considers that the situation where Bill 61/2013 remains pending continues to represent a potential threat to the property;
    8. Urges the State Party to ensure that the proposed Bill 61/2013 is not approved, and also considers that failure to resolve this issue could create conditions to re-inscribe the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger, in line with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    9. Noting that progress has been made by the State Party on the implementation of some of the 2015 mission recommendations, also requests the State Party to ensure that the construction of the Baixo Iguaçu hydropower dam complies with all recommendations of the 2015 mission with regards to this project, in particular:
      1. In addition to the existing Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), develop a specific assessment of any potential impacts of the construction and operation of the Baixo Iguaçu hydropower plant specifically on the OUV and integrity of the property,
      2. Ensure that ICMBio has the opportunity to review this assessment and undertake appropriate coordination with the relevant Argentinian authorities, in order to confirm whether ICMBio would still give its authorization for the construction of the dam and/or whether the conditions it has already elaborated should be further amended or completed based on the results of the assessment,
      3. Ensure that further development of the project does not proceed prior to a copy of the specific assessment and the conclusions of ICMBio having been submitted to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN,
      4. In case authorization is given by ICMBio, ensure that the conditions it sets are duly fulfilled before the construction of the dam proceeds, and submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN, the conclusions of ICMBio on the degree to which the conditions have been fulfilled;
    10. Calls upon and encourages the State Party to continue its efforts in the field of key species monitoring and to increase its cooperation in this regard with the State Party of Argentina;
    11. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6735 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.71 Cerrado Protected areas: Chapada dos Veadeiros and Emas National Parks (Brazil) (N 1035) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.29 and 39 COM 7B.27, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
    3. Reiterates its concern that the majority of the Chapada dos Veadeiros component of the property continues to no longer benefit from National Park status, and that its integrity is therefore no longer guaranteed;
    4. Acknowledges the progress achieved by the State Party to restore the protection status of the Chapada dos Veadeiros component, including the undertaking of the public consultation process on the expansion of the park, but notes that a number of issues remain to be urgently resolved;
    5. Regretting that the State Party did not submit any proposal for a significant boundary modification of the property, in line with Paragraph 165 of the Operational Guidelines and as requested by the Committee at its 37th and 39th sessions, urges the State Party to ensure that the Decree on the expansion of the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park is approved as a matter of priority and to submit, by 1 February 2017, a proposal for a significant boundary modification of the property to reflect the new boundaries of the National Park;
    6. Requests the State Party to continue its efforts in the implementation of the management plan of the Pouso Alto Environmental Protection Area (EPA), which surrounds the property and in the undertaking of the land tenure regularization process;
    7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the case that significant progress to address the lack of protection of parts of the property has not been achieved, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6736 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.72 Talamanca Range-La Amistad Reserves / La Amistad National Park (Costa Rica/Panama) (N 205bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.28, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Commends the States Parties of Costa Rica and Panama for the progress achieved in strengthening transboundary cooperation and stabilizing the threats to the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) originating from agricultural encroachment and cattle grazing, as well as potential road construction and mining development;
    4. Notes with concern the cultivation of illegal crops in the Costa Rican part of the property and its implications for the security situation and requests the State Party of Costa Rica to continue its efforts in addressing this issue;
    5. Deeply regrets that, despite the Committee’s previous decisions, a new hydropower project on the Changuinola river (Changuinola II or CHAN 140) has been approved and preparatory measures have already been undertaken, without prior finalization of the requested Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for the entire property;
    6. Reiterates its position that any development of new hydropower projects prior to the finalization and adequate review of the SEA for the entire property would lead to its inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    7. Noting the commencement of the SEA process for the property by the State Party of Panama and the commitment by the State Party of Costa Rica to potentially extend it to the entire transboundary property in line with national procedural standards and international best practice, including the IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment,  also requests both States Parties to submit the final joint version of the SEA to the World Heritage Centre for evaluation by IUCN;
    8. Taking into consideration the commitment expressed by the State Party of Panama to implement the recommendations made by the 2016 Reactive Monitoring mission and in particular to use the results of the SEA as guidelines for the planning and operation of any new large-scale infrastructure development projects in and around the property, including the recently approved CHAN 140 hydropower project, notes that a number of further additional steps will be required, as outlined in the SEA document, including preparation by 2018 of a comprehensive assessment of cumulative impacts;
    9. Further requests the two States Parties to develop appropriate mechanisms in order to fulfil their commitments and to avoid and mitigate any impact on the property OUV and to submit to the World Heritage Centre additional information on concrete actions that will be proposed in this regard;
    10. Also takes note of the commitment expressed by the State Party of Panama to renegotiate the concession contract with Hydroelectric Hidroecológica del Teribe S.A. (Bonyic) in order to comply with the results of the SEA, including by implementing the agreements achieved with the indigenous communities in the framework of the development of the SEA;
    11. Requests furthermore the State Party of Panama, in consultation with the State Party of Costa Rica, to develop a long-term biological monitoring program to implement mitigation measures that minimize the negative impacts caused by both hydroelectric projects on the freshwater biodiversity of the Changuinola and Bonyic rivers;
    12. Requests moreover the States Parties to implement all other recommendations made by the 2016 Reactive Monitoring mission;
    13. Finally requests the States Parties to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a joint updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the absence of significant progress in the implementation of these recommendations, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6737 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.73 Morne - Trois Pitons National Park (Dominica) (N 814) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.30, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Regrets that the State Party did not submit a report on the state of conservation of the property, as requested by the Committee;
    4. Takes note of the Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) for exploration and production phases of the geothermal project in the Roseau Valley submitted by the State Party to the World Heritage Centre;
    5. Noting that the abovementioned EIAs do not include an assessment of potential impacts of the project on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, reiterates its request to the State Party to prepare such an EIA, in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and urges again the State Party to suspend the geothermal project until the above mentioned EIA has been submitted to the World Heritage Centre, and reviewed by IUCN;
    6. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property, to assess the impacts of existing geothermal infrastructure, and the current status of the geothermal project in the Roseau Valley and its potential impacts on the OUV of the property;
    7. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6738 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.74 Galápagos Islands (Ecuador) (N 1bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decisions 34 COM 7A.15, 35 COM 7B.30, 36 COM 7B.32, and 38 COM 7B.83, adopted at its 34th (Brasilia, 2010), 35th (UNESCO, 2011), 36th (Saint Petersburg, 2012) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Welcomes the progress achieved by the State Party in implementing the recommendations of the 2010 Reactive Monitoring mission;
    4. Notes the progress achieved by the State Party in addressing solid waste management and requests the State Party to continue its efforts to establish an effective system of solid waste management and to also improve the management of sewage on land and sea;
    5. Also requests the State Party to provide further information regarding the recent rezoning of the marine part of the property announced in March 2016, in view of evaluating the impacts on threats from illegal fishing raised in previous Committee decisions;
    6. Expresses its concern that comprehensive and effective management responses, in particular as regards the fundamental and related challenges of biosecurity and tourism, continue to require further strengthening of current efforts and urges the State Party to fully implement the requests made by the Committee when it decided to remove the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger at its 34th session, including:
      1. Development and implementation of a clear tourism strategy for Galápagos, with a focus on establishing mechanisms to discourage rapid and uncontrolled growth in visitation,
      2. Completion of the biosecurity chain of inspection and control by establishing the dedicated cargo facilities at a single Guayaquil cargo loading dock and by considering Baltra as the only authorized point of entry to the islands to receive cargo from the continent;
    7. Further requests the State Party to invite, before its 42nd session in 2018, an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess the progress achieved in addressing these pending issues;
    8. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6739 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.75 Islands and Protected Areas of the Gulf of California (Mexico) (N 1182ter) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Highly commends the State Party for its efforts aimed at the preservation of the critically endangered vaquita and totoaba, but notes with utmost concern that the status of the vaquita population has become extremely critical and that the species is threatened with extinction, possibly as early as 2018;
    3. Considers that the critical status of the vaquita population represents an ascertained danger to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    4. Requests the State Party to continue its efforts and take urgent additional measures to address the threats to vaquita and totoaba, including further promotion of a switch to alternative fishing gear for shrimp fishing, and the introduction of an extension of the suspension of gillnet-based fishing activities in the Northern Gulf of California beyond two years and an eventual introduction of a permanent ban on gillnet fishing in the entire range of vaquita;
    5. Notes the conclusion of the State Party that the key threat to both totoaba, as the target, and vaquita, as bycatch, is posed by illegal fishing of totoaba, including by criminal organizations involved in illegal international trafficking of totoaba swim bladders, and welcomes the dialogue established by the State Party with the Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and urges the State Party to pursue this dialogue and to continue to take actions at national level against criminal networks involved in totoaba trafficking;
    6. Calls upon the States Parties, which are transit and destination countries for totoaba swim bladder, to support the State Party to halt the illegal trade in totoaba swim bladder and other illegal wildlife products, in particular through the implementation of the CITES Convention;
    7. Also requests the State Party to invite, as a matter of urgency, a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess its current state of conservation and to evaluate whether the property meets the conditions for inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in the case of confirmation of the ascertained or potential danger to the Outstanding Universal Value, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6740 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.76 Coiba National Park and its Special Zone of Marine Protection (Panama) (N 1138rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.84, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the adoption of a resolution authorizing the removal of the livestock from the property, which should allow to address the significant delay in this issue, and requests the State Party to proceed with the livestock removal as a matter of utmost priority;
    4. Notes with concern that no significant progress has been achieved in the implementation of a number of key Committee requests, in particular those related to regulations to ensure that no coastal development is permitted within the boundaries of the property and the management of fisheries, and considers that a continued absence of effective regulations and management programmes in that regard would constitute a potential danger to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    5. Reiterates its requests to the State Party to:
      1. Ensure that the Coiba Fund becomes fully operational as a matter of priority and the decision-making power of the Executive Council is strengthened, by including representatives from the tourism sector and the local communities from the coastal areas opposite the property,
      2. Rigorously ensure that no development will be permitted within the boundaries of the property, and that cumulative impacts on the property’s OUV caused by developments on the mainland are effectively addressed,
      3. Complete, implement and enforce the management plan for the Special Zone of Marine Protection (SZMP) as a matter of priority, which should include clear regulations related to fisheries management, including no-take zones and seasonal closures of critical areas, such as Hannibal Bank, Montuosa Island and Uva Island, and to provide an electronic copy and three printed copies of the draft management plan for the SZMP, for review by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN;
    6. Also requests the State Party to invite an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to evaluate impacts of unregulated fishing, assess progress with the implementation of the 2014 mission recommendations and provide technical advice regarding the urgent implementation of the outstanding recommendations in the context of the new institutional framework;
    7. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6741 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.77 Pitons Management Area (Saint Lucia) (N 1161 The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.85, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcoming the efforts of the State Party and external supporters to address threats to the property stemming from alien invasive plants, including by investing in communication and public awareness-raising, encourages the State Party to continue and increase these efforts;
    4. Also welcoming the endorsement of the Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) study by the Cabinet of Ministers, notes that the process of integrating the recommendations of the LAC study into the Physical Planning and Development Act has commenced, and requests the State Party to complete the integration of these recommendations into the national legislative and institutional framework as a matter of priority, to ensure compliance with the recommendations can be enforced;
    5. Also notes the confirmation by the State Party that a dialogue with the developers of the Freedom Bay and Sugar Beach development projects is currently taking place which is aimed at ensuring that the developments conform with the recommendations of the LAC study;
    6. Reiterates its consideration that, should any development exceeding the limits of acceptable change, or otherwise having a negative impact on Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, be allowed to proceed, the integrity of the property would clearly be compromised, leading to consideration of the inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger, in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    7. Also encourages the State Party to fully reflect the conclusions of the LAC study in the planned revision of the Management Plan, and also requests the State Party to provide an electronic and three printed copies of the revised Management Plan for review by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN;
    8. Further notes the State Party’ stated intention to undertake boundary demarcation of policy areas within the property (zones with different levels of restrictions on development) and to seek the assistance of the World Heritage Centre in identifying funds for this exercise, and further requests the State Party to provide to the World Heritage Centre more details on the planned activities and their objectives, as well as the challenges to demarcation noted by the State Party, which are due to private land tenure within the property;
    9. Notes furthermore the preliminary conclusions that the geothermal potential of Saint Lucia appears to have no significant overlap with the property, and requests furthermore the State Party to inform the Committee of any geothermal developments which may directly or indirectly impact on the OUV of the property;
    10. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6742 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.78 Okavango Delta (Botswana) (N 1432) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.5, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Commends the progress made by the State Party in terminating mineral prospecting licenses in the property, and requests the State Party to conclude negotiations with remaining licensees to terminate all prospecting activities within the property’s buffer zone, and to continue monitoring and managing prospecting licenses and mining operations outside the buffer zone so as to avoid any adverse impacts on the property;
    4. Reiterates its position that mineral exploration or exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the International Council of Mining and Metals’ (ICMM) Position Statement of not undertaking such activities within World Heritage properties;
    5. Welcoming the progress made in developing wildlife monitoring protocols, also requests the State Party to integrate these protocols in the systematic wildlife monitoring programme, which should include replicable aerial surveys across the entire property to establish population baselines for key species and to track long-term trends;
    6. Notes the measures taken to address management effectiveness, governance as well as access, rights and benefits, and reiterates its requests to the State Party to:
      1. Continue efforts to rationalize veterinary cordon fencing, including through the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA),
      2. Expand and strengthen programmes, which accommodate traditional resource use for livelihoods, user access rights, cultural rights and access to opportunities to participate in the tourism sector, in keeping with the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV),
      3. Continue efforts to address a range of other protection and management issues including governance, stakeholder empowerment, management planning, management capacity and control of alien invasive species;
    7. Further requests the State Party to submit the revised management plan for review by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, prior to its approval, and calls on the international community to provide technical and financial support in its development and implementation;
    8. Notes with concern the potential impacts of water resource management in Angola and Namibia on the property, and requests furthermore the States Parties of Botswana, Angola and Namibia to liaise closely to ensure that any proposed major developments within the Okavango watershed which may adversely impact the OUV of the property are subject to EIAs in conformity with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment; these EIAs should be submitted to the World Heritage Centre and IUCN for review prior to taking any decisions that would be difficult to reverse;
    9. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6743 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.79 Dja Wildlife Reserve (Cameroon) (N 407)

    The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 36 COM 7B.1, 37 COM 7B.1, 38 COM 7B.86 and 39 COM 7B.1, adopted at its 36th (Saint-Petersburg, 2012), 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013), 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
    3. Warmly welcomes the efforts undertaken by the State Party, notably the creation of an Interministerial Committee on Dja to strengthen the sustainable conservation of the property, the increase of the operational and investment budgets, improved knowledge of the state of conservation of large mammals, regular control of forestry development units (FDU) and the approval of the terms of reference and the funding strategy of the Strategic and Social Environmental Evaluation (SSEE), for the major projects around the property, and thanks all the partners assisting the State Party in contributing to the protection and the sustainable conservation of the property;
    4. Notes with satisfaction that no mining activity has been developed inside the property since end-2014, and that the mining exploration permits inside and around the property have not been renewed, and reiterates its position regarding the incompatibility of mining exploration or exploitation with the status of World Heritage, policy supported by the declaration of the International Council for Mining and Metal (ICMM) not to undertake such activities in World Heritage properties;
    5. Also notes with satisfaction the measures taken by the State Party to address poaching;
    6. Expresses, however, its concern regarding the findings of the 2015 joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission regarding the serious threats to the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, in case the Mékin Damn is completed without any mitigating measures being taken to diminish the negative impacts, as well as the increase in poaching resulting in a worrying decrease in the numbers of large mammals, in particular the elephant;
    7. Adopts the following corrective measures and strongly urges the State Party to implement them by the 42nd session of the World Heritage Committee in 2018:
      1. Ensure the recruitment of an environmental expert within the Hydro Mékin Society and urgently implement the Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP) ensuring that the measures mitigating the negative impacts of the dam to the property have been implemented,
      2. Prepare a precise map of the flood zone that will result from the Mékin dam,
      3. Prepare and implement a safeguarding plan for the wildlife living in the flood zone of the Mékin dam,
      4. Continue to strengthen the staff of the eco-guards and their operational capacities in the different bases for an effective surveillance of all human pressure, including improved consultation and coordination of the actions of the technical and financial partners of the property involved in the anti-poaching combat,
      5. Continue to strengthen the prosecution system concerning poachers and improve collaboration with the decentralised services of the State in information sharing concerning the anti-poaching combat (sub-prefecture, national police force, etc.) to ensure the completion of the legal process and discourage the poachers and avoid demotivation of the eco-guards,
      6. Continue to reinforce control of traditional hunting and poaching inside the property and at its periphery, in liaison with the vigilance committees,
      7. Develop alternatives to bush meat for indigenous and local populations through, among others, the enhancement of non-ligneous forest products and the promotion of a sustainable family agricultural system in the periphery of the property;
    8. Notes with concern the other conservation problems noted by the 2015 mission, namely deforestation at the periphery of the property, the perspectives of an extension of activities by the Sud Cameroon Hévéa Society with the demographic increase which might result, and the insufficient human and material means of the conservation service of the property;
    9. Requests the State Party to implement all the other recommendations of the 2015 mission;
    10. Launches an appeal to the international community to support the efforts of the State Party in the implementation of these corrective measures and also requests all the concerned partners around the property to continue and strengthen their support for its sustainable conservation;
    11. Encourages the State Party to reinforce dialogue and communication with all the stakeholders in particular the World Heritage Centre and IUCN regarding the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations;
    12. Further requests the State Party to submit, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the corrective measures and the above points, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018, with a view to considering, in case significant progress is not recorded in respect of the conditions enumerated above, the possibility of inscribing the property on the World Heritage List in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6744 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.80 Lake Turkana National Parks (Kenya) (N 801bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.4, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Regrets that no response was provided by the States Parties of Kenya and Ethiopia to the recommendations from the 2015 mission and notes with utmost concern that no update is provided on the status of the Kuraz Sugar Scheme, as well as the impounding of the Gibe III reservoir and the measures taken to mitigate the impacts thereof on the property;
    4. Regretting that progress with preparing the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) has been limited to the development of draft Terms of Reference (ToR), notes with concern that these do not appear to foresee the inclusion of development projects that may have an indirect or cumulative impact on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, and urges the States Parties of Kenya and Ethiopia to revise the ToR, in consultation with the World Heritage Centre, IUCN and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and to ensure that the SEA will be undertaken to accepted international standards and in accordance with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, to enable identification of mitigation measures and the least damaging and most sustainable alternatives for all developments impacting on the Lake Turkana basin;
    5. Requests the States Parties of Kenya and Ethiopia to ensure that an international bidding process is undertaken on the basis of the revised ToR to recruit an independent firm to undertake the SEA, and to submit the report of the Scoping Study for the SEA to the World Heritage Centre for review by IUCN, as soon as it is available, and no later than 1 February 2017;
    6. Also requests the World Heritage Centre and UNEP to work effectively with the States Parties of Kenya and Ethiopia and IUCN on the joint UNEP-supported Ethiopia-Kenya project for the sustainable development in Lake Turkana and its basins, in order to support the two States Parties in the implementation of the requests made by the Committee, including in relation to the SEA, and to ensure an active consideration of the Committee’s concerns in UNEP’s work;
    7. Further requests the States Parties of Kenya and Ethiopia to provide more details on the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for a “Cross-border Integrated Programme for Sustainable Peace and Socio-economic Transformation” and to ensure adequate water flow from the Omo River to maintain the OUV of the property, and to integrate the findings from the SEA into the cross-border programme;
    8. Notes the establishment of a joint expert panel for monitoring basin-wide natural resource management under the existing Ethiopia-Kenya Joint Ministerial Commission, and requests furthermore the States Parties to provide further details on the terms of reference of this commission and the joint expert panel;
    9. Also regrets that no wildlife census has been conducted or planned to establish baseline data of key wildlife species in the property, and reiterates its request to the State Party of Kenya to urgently implement all of the outstanding recommendations of the 2012 mission;
    10. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a report on progress achieved with the implementation of the 2015 mission recommendations and with the SEA, and on the status of impounding of the Gibe III hydroelectric dam, the proposed expansion of the Kuraz Sugar Scheme and any other developments that may have the potential to impact the OUV of the property, including oil exploration and the Lake Turkana Wind Farm project in Kenya, and to submit by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6745 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.81 Lake Malawi National Park (Malawi) (N 289) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.92, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Regrets that the information submitted by the State Party did not address the requests made by the Committee in its Decision 38 COM 7B.92;
    4. Reiterates its concern over oil exploration activities throughout the lake, noting that an accidental spill would pose a potentially severe risk to the entire lake ecosystem, including the aquatic zone and shoreline of the property, and urges the State Party to cancel the oil exploitation permit which overlaps with the property;
    5. Reiterates its position that oil, gas and mineral exploration and exploitation are incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the commitments made by industry leaders such as Shell and Total not to undertake such activities within World Heritage properties, and reiterates its call on Surestream and RAKGAS, that have been granted oil exploration concessions on the lake, to make a commitment to not exploit nor explore for oil or gas in World Heritage properties;
    6. Requests the State Party to ensure that any oil exploration activities outside of the property, as well as any other development that may impact on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, including tourism developments, are subject to Environmental Impact Assessments in conformity with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment;
    7. Reiterates its request to the State Party to implement all the recommendations of the 2014 Reactive Monitoring mission;
    8. Also requests the State Party to complete the revision of the 2007-2011 management plan for the property and provide it for review by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, together with the approved sustainable tourism management strategy, in order to ensure that the revised management plan is aligned with the tourism plan and includes provisions for the implementation of the above-mentioned mission recommendations;
    9. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a progress report and, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6746 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.82 Rwenzori Mountains National Park (Uganda) (N 684) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 36 COM 7B.4 and 38 COM 7B.93, adopted at its 36th (Saint-Petersburg, 2012) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Welcomes further progress made in engaging local communities in the management and protection of the property;
    4. Also welcomes the progress made in implementing the ecological monitoring plan for the property, encourages the State Party to develop additional monitoring protocols to assess population trends for key large mammal species, and reiterates its recommendation to the State Party to work with the Mountains Specialist Group of the World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) to safeguard the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property in the long-term;
    5. Appreciates the decision not to allow the development of a mini-hydropower scheme partially inside the property on the grounds that it would adversely impact the OUV of the property;
    6. Notes the difficulty of organizing coordinated patrols along the international border with the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) due to insurgent activity on the Congolese side of the border, and reiterates its encouragement to the States Parties of Uganda and DRC to continue their efforts towards developing a formal protocol to strengthen their collaboration;
    7. Reiterates its utmost concern about the award of a 25-year concession to re-open the Kilembe copper mine adjacent to the property;
    8. Reiterates its position that mineral exploration or exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the International Council of Mining and Metals’ (ICMM) Position Statement of not undertaking such activities within World Heritage properties, and urges the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre details of the concession awarded to Tibet Hima Ltd and an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) on the potential impacts of any activity on both the property and the Virunga National Park downstream, in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and in consultation with the State Party of the DRC;
    9. Also appreciates the funding provided by different donors to develop tourism and management frameworks for the property, calls on further donors to support the site, and reiterates its request to the State Party to provide the revised management plan, including the sustainable financing strategy and the business plan for review by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN, prior to approval;
    10. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6747 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.83 Serengeti National Park (United Republic of Tanzania) (N 156) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 35 COM 7B.7 and 38 COM 7B.94, adopted at its 35th (UNESCO, 2011) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Welcomes the continued efforts of the State Party to strengthen its anti-poaching operations, which have reduced the number of elephants and rhinos lost to poachers, and requests the State Party to further strengthen these efforts across the wider Serengeti ecosystem;
    4. Notes the completion of an aerial wildlife survey of the property, and encourages the State Party to assess, in cooperation with the State Party of Kenya, the potential cause for the migration of elephants from Mara into Serengeti, as suggested in the 2014 census report in order to inform future management strategies;
    5. Also welcomes the completion of a first draft of the Strategic Environmental Assessment on the Comprehensive Transport and Trade System Development Master Plan, and the State Party’s intention to share the second draft with the World Heritage Centre for review, prior to its approval;
    6. Further welcomes the reported progress towards extension of the National Park to include critical access to water and shoreline habitats on Lake Victoria’s Speke Gulf, and also requests the State Party to ensure consent of and compensations for any affected communities and submit the draft proposed extension to the World Heritage Centre, for review before it is finalized;
    7. Appreciating the support provided by the Government of Germany for a major project focusing on livelihoods and a preliminary feasibility study of road transport routes to the south of the property, calls upon the international donor community to provide the necessary technical and financial assistance to enable the next stages;
    8. Noting the limited progress made in evaluating road surfacing options for the Naabi Hill - Seronera road through the property, reiterates its request to the State Party to carry out a full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the entire road from Lodwar to Seronera to assess the impacts of the different options on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of both Serengeti National Park and Ngorongoro Conservation Area, and to submit it to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN, prior to a decision on surfacing any section of this road;
    9. Acknowledges the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the States Parties of Tanzania and Kenya on the Mara River Basin, and also reiterates its request to both States Parties to develop and implement a joint management plan for the basin;
    10. Further notes that the EIA for the extension of the Mugumu Airport is being revised following review by the National Environmental Management Council prior to its submission to the World Heritage Centre for review before a final decision is taken;
    11. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above and of the 2010 mission recommendations, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6748 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.84 Mana Pools National Park, Sapi and Chewore Safari Areas (Zimbabwe) (N 302) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.97, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the implementation of the environmental safeguards in the development of the new Mana Pools Lodge at Vine Camp, and the State Party’s assurance that any further developments will be located in more peripheral areas, away from the Zambezi riverfront, and requests the State Party to ensure regular monitoring of the effectiveness of the environmental management and monitoring plans at Vine Camp, and to adopt an adaptive approach to its management;
    4. Notes with significant concern that the 2014 national aerial survey of key wildlife species has revealed a decline in the Zambezi Valley populations of elephants and other mammals which are key attributes of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property, and that the threat of poaching is currently too high to consider a feasibility study for a possible reintroduction programme of black rhinoceros;
    5. Notes the development of an anti-poaching strategy for the property and a broader elephant management plan for the Zambezi Valley, and also requests the State Party to ensure that they are fully resourced and effectively implemented so as to restore and maintain the property’s OUV;
    6. Regrets that the State Party has not been able to complete the new management plan for the property due to lack of funds and encourages it to apply for International Assistance to support this work;
    7. Also notes with appreciation the information provided by the State Party of Zambia that the approved open cast copper mine in Lower Zambezi National Park has not been developed due to an injunction by the High Court, and reminds the State Party of Zambia of its obligations under Article 6.3 of the Convention;
    8. Further requests the State Party of Zambia to ensure, in any case, that the potential impacts of copper mining in Lower Zambezi National Park on the OUV of the property are carefully assessed, in accordance with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, before taking any decisions that may be difficult to reverse;
    9. Also welcomes progress made by the States Parties of Zimbabwe and Zambia to establish a trans-frontier conservation area linking the property with Zambia’s adjacent Lower Zambezi National Park, and also encourages them to finalize the Memorandum of Understanding and further enhance joint operations to protect and manage the area;
    10. Reiterates its recommendation to the States Parties to consider nominating the Lower Zambezi National Park, in order to eventually constitute a joint trans-boundary inscription on the World Heritage List, in line with the World Heritage Committee's recommendation at the time of inscription of the property;
    11. Requests furthermore the State Party of Zambia to keep the World Heritage Centre informed on the status of the decision regarding the Kangaluwi and Chisawa opencast mine in Lower Zambezi National Park and its potential impacts on the property’s OUV;
    12. Requests moreover the State Party of Zimbabwe to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, a detailed report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6749 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.85 Banc d’Arguin National Park (Mauritania) (N 506) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.62, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the progress made on implementing the recommendations of the 2014 joint Reactive Monitoring mission, as well as towards the application for the Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) designation of the property and its surrounding areas and encourages the State Party to pursue its efforts to submit a completed application to the International Maritime Organization in February 2017;
    4. Encourages the State Party to continue involving the local communities in the management and conservation of the property;
    5. Notes that no oil or mining exploration permits are attributed within the property and that the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) plan is in process, but expresses its concern about potential impacts if any of the ongoing exploration projects lead to exploitation, in particular, in oil blocks close to the property;
    6. Requests the State Party to ensure that all future projects that could impact on the property are subject to an assessment of their impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and to submit to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN:
      1. A Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of developments at Chami, in order to identify measures to avoid and where necessary mitigate impacts on the OUV of the property,
      2. EIAs for any future developments at the Tasiast gold mine and for off-shore oil exploitation;
    7. Also requests the State Party to provide data on local and non-local use of the Nouamghar road collected by the new control points to ascertain that the road is not impacting on the OUV, in particular marine resources, of the property;
    8. Further requests the State Party to fully implement all recommendations made by the 2014 mission, in particular:
      1. Ensure the sustainability of the current suveillance system, and maintain the ban on fishing by the non-Imraguen communities, and on fishing by motorized boats,
      2. In consultation with scientific organisations and the Imraguen local communitiy, address the problem of fishing of endangered species (sharks and rays) in order to guarantee their conservation; additional studies to identify any pressures on populations of turtles (reproductive and migratory) within the park also desirable,
      3. Put in place a permit system in order to prevent fishing pressure related to the immigration of non-resident communities which have come to fish,
      4. Undertake research to determine the effects of overfishing outside the property on the biodiversity located within the property, and reinforce measures to ensure the sustainability of fisheries located outside the property but in Mauritanian waters, in particular through regional and international cooperation;
    9. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6750 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.86 Socotra Archipelago (Yemen) (N 1263) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.6, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Expresses its sincere condolences to the State Party and the inhabitants of Socotra for the damages and loss of life caused by the passage of cyclones Chapala and Megh, which ravaged the island in November 2015;
    4. Commends the State Party for the progress achieved with the implementation of the 2012 mission recommendations, despite the challenges resulting from the current security situation in mainland Yemen, and welcomes in particular the appointment of a Deputy Governor for Environment and Development, the initiatives taken to strengthen the Environmental Protection Agency’s role in the management of the property, and the ongoing consideration of a policy to cancel all previous decisions to expand main access roads within the property;
    5. Also welcomes the support provided by international donors and partners for the conservation of the archipelago’s biodiversity and the sustainable development of its communities;
    6. Reiterates its significant concern over the increased vulnerability of the property due to the security situation in mainland Yemen, considers that the impacts of the recent cyclones are likely to have further increased the property’s vulnerability to pressures from unsustainable resource use, soil erosion and habitat degradation, notes that these impacts require further and urgent assessment, and calls on the international community to support Yemen in implementing the actions identified in the Needs Assessment for Socotra Archipelago World Heritage site, developed in February 2016, at the workshop hosted by the Arab Regional Centre for World Heritage (ARC-WH);
    7. Requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess its state of conservation, in particular in view of the impacts from wood cutting, overgrazing, unsustainable use of marine and terrestrial resources, and the impacts from the cyclones, and to support the State Party in identifying priorities for rehabilitation and management activities;
    8. Encourages the State Party to hire, as soon as it is feasible to do so, a professional specialized company to assess the possibilities of and risks involved in salvaging the two ships grounded inside the property near Haulafe and take appropriate measures to restore any damages caused by their grounding;
    9. Urges the State Party to promote the revival of traditional land management practices including seasonal transhumance in an effort to reduce threats from soil erosion and habitat degradation as a result of overgrazing, and to ensure the enforcement of the archipelago’s protected area regulations and its zoning plan, in order to address threats from unsustainable resource use both in the terrestrial and marine environments;
    10. Further requests the State Party to continue its efforts to implement all recommendations of the 2012 mission;
    11. Requests moreover the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6751 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.87 Keoladeo National Park (India) (N 340) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.66, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the issuance of a draft notification declaring a 500 metre strip of eco-senstivie zone around the property boundary in order to regulate developments in the immediate vicinity of the property, and requests the State Party to ensure that a full stakeholder consultation process is held prior to finalizing the notification, and during the development of the Zonal Master Plan that is expected to follow the publication in the Official Gazette of the final notification;
    4. Notes with utmost concern that the provision of water to the property remains insufficient to guarantee adequate water flows, recalling that at least 550 million cubic feet (mcft) was recommended by the 2008 mission to sustain the property’s wetland values, and strongly urges the State Party to increase the water flow through the Govardhan Drain and to ensure annual releases of water from Panchana Dam in order to augment the water supply to the property;
    5. Reiterates its request to the State Party to provide clear and accurate data and analyses of bird counts, including detailed information on methodologies used, in order to demonstrate the sustained recovery of bird populations;
    6. Appreciates the operation undertaken to remove invasive African sharptooth catfish from selected areas of the property, and also requests the State Party to develop an adaptive invasive species control and eradication strategy, including for Water Hyacinth and Prosopis juliflora to be integrated into the revised management plan;
    7. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to submit an electronic and three printed copies of the draft revised management plan to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6752 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.88 Great Himalayan National Park Conservation Area (India) (N 1406rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 8B.11 and 38 COM 8B.7, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions, respectively,
    3. Welcomes the further progress made by the State Party as regards the intended expansion of the property, in particular the decision to incorporate Khirganga National Park within the property in the future, and encourages the State Party to continue the plan for progressive expansion, with the technical support of the World Heritage Centre and IUCN as required, and taking into account the findings of the regional comparative study; and to submit its proposals to the World Heritage Centre, in the format of a new Nomination for examination by the Committee;
    4. Also welcomes the progress achieved by the State Party in working with local communities and indigenous peoples, and also encourages further local consultation and involvement in decision-making to find mutually acceptable ways to resolve any ongoing resource use conflicts, while respecting any rights of use, and on the basis of an accurate assessment of impacts from resource use (in particular grazing and collection of medicinal plants) on the Outstanding Universal Value of the property;
    5. Requests the State Party to re-consider the possibility of notification of Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary as a national park;
    6. Also requests the State Party to fully consider and address the management deficiencies identified in the recently published national level Management Effectiveness Assessment exercise, which took place from 2006 to 2014, in particular:
      1. Regulate the transit of livestock through the property,
      2. Conclude the process to recognise the rights of local communities in Jiwanal Valley,
      3. Consolidate the management of the Parwati Valley,
      4. Address human-wildlife conflicts,
      5. Ensure adequate levels of staffing, equipment and training for patrolling in high-altitude terrain;
    7. Further welcomes the State Party’s commitment to contribute to a regional comparative study to assess the scope of ecosystems within the Himalayas and adjacent mountain regions with a view to identifying potential World Heritage candidate areas and boundary configurations in this region, including potential serial nominations / extensions, as recommended by the Committee, and recommends that the State Party consult with other relevant States Parties from the region, as well as with IUCN and other partners as required;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2018, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 43rd session in 2019.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6753 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.89 Sagarmatha National Park (Nepal) (N 120) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.68, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the initiation of the UNDP funded “Community Based Flood and Glacial Lake Outburst Risk Reduction project”, especially considering the potential threat arising from climate change, and urges the State Party to ensure that the implementation of this project is closely monitored to ensure compliance with environmental measures and in cooperation with local communities to ensure respect of their cultural and spiritual values and practices;
    4. Also welcomes the progress made by the State Party with the development of the draft 2016-2020 Management Plan for Sagarmatha National Park and its buffer zone, which was reviewed by the IUCN Advisory mission, and encourages the State Party to reflect the findings of the Advisory mission in the Management Plan and submit the completed plan (in English) to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017, for review by IUCN;
    5. Reiterates its concern that no verdict of the Supreme Court of Nepal has yet been made with respect to the Kongde View Resort to determine whether or not it is located inside the property, notes with concern that the resort is permitted to continue to operate until the verdict is issued, and also urges the State Party to take urgent measures to ensure that any impacts from the continued operation of the Kongde View Resort on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property are adequately mitigated;
    6. Also notes with concern the reported increase in illegal wood collection from the property and its buffer zone, the continued challenge of solid waste management and other reported impacts from increasing visitation, including noise and visual impacts from uncontrolled and unregulated helicopter use, and also requests the State Party to include in the Management Plan adequate measures to address these issues, based on the recommendations of the Advisory mission and, where necessary, additional assessments of impacts on the OUV of the property;
    7. Appreciates the State Party’s intention to submit a park zonation map to the World Heritage Centre once completed, and reiterates its encouragement to the State Party to submit a minor boundary modification to formally recognize the buffer zone of Sagarmatha National Park as a buffer zone to the property, consistent with the Operational Guidelines;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6754 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.90 Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex (Thailand) (N 590rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.17, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Commends the State Party for the significant efforts taken to address the threat from illegal logging of Siamese Rosewood, and welcomes the international collaboration, including coordinated patrols with the State Party of Cambodia, to prevent and suppress illegal trade in Siamese Rosewood;
    4. Notes that illegal logging is still a serious concern as a result of the increasing market value of Siamese Rosewood and therefore, requests the State Party to provide updated statistics on illegal logging of Siamese Rosewood for fiscal years 2014-2016 as well as outcomes from the implementation of the Action Plan to Prevent and Suppress Illegal Logging of Siamese Rosewood in the Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex (DPKYFC);
    5. Urges the States Parties of Thailand, Cambodia, China, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Viet Nam to further strengthen their collaboration to combat illegal logging at the source, reduce demand at its destination, and intercept shipments of illegally logged Rosewood during transit;
    6. Also requests the State Party to undertake further investigations to determine the extent to which poaching, associated or not with illegal logging, is a threat to the property’s OUV;
    7. Notes with appreciation the efforts undertaken by the State Party to address encroachment and the construction of illegal resorts, and further requests the State Party to ensure that the process of clarifying land rights in forest areas is undertaken in a fully transparent manner and with full participation of the concerned local communities;
    8. Also notes that Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) for the Huay Satone Dam and the expansion of Highway 348, both within the property, have not been allowed, and requests furthermore the State Party to confirm unambiguously and in writing that these projects will not be permitted to proceed;
    9. Requests moreover the State Party to invite an IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to monitor and evaluate effective implementation of the Action Plan on Curbing Illegal Logging and Trade of Siamese Rosewood in Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex 2014-2019;
    10. Requests in addition the State Party to provide an electronic and three printed copies of the draft Strategic Plan on Tourism in World Natural Heritage for review by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN;
    11. Finally requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in light of assessment of the Reactive Monitoring mission, possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6815 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.91 Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park (Viet Nam) (N 951bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 8B.6, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Regrets that the State Party did not submit a report on the state of conservation of the property, as requested by the Committee;
    4. Reiterates its concern about proposals to construct a cable car to provide access to the Son Doong cave within the strictly protected zone of the property and the potential impacts this may have on the property’s Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), and urges again the State Party to complete Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs), in line with IUCN’s Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, prior to a decision on the implementation of any tourism development projects and to ensure that development proposals are not permitted if they would negatively impact the OUV of the property;
    5. Reiterates its requests to the State Party to:
      1. Revise the property’s Sustainable Tourism Development Plan to include the property extension and ensure an integrated and environmentally sensitive approach to tourism that ensures visitor use remains compatible with the OUV of the property,
      2. Submit to the World Heritage Centre updated data on the population status of key large mammal species, including tiger, Asiatic black bear, Asian elephant, giant muntjac, Asian wild dog, gaur and saola;
    6. Requests the State Party to provide data on the results of its law enforcement activities to address illegal logging and poaching;
    7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6755 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.92 Bialowieza Forest (Belarus / Poland) (N 33ter) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.12, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Notes with concern the recent amendments to the Forest Management Plan for the Białowieża Forest District in Poland which would provide for a threefold increase in fellings, including in mature stands, and the recently adopted "Programme for the Białowieża Forest as a UNESCO Natural Heritage and a Natura 2000 site", which would allow active habitat restoration interventions in two thirds of the area of each of the three Forest districts in Poland within the property which could result in disturbance of natural ecological processes;
    4. Welcomes the State Party’s invitation of an IUCN Advisory mission in June 2016, to provide recommendations regarding how the recent amendments to the Forest Management Plan relate to the requirements for protection of the property’s Outstanding Universal Value;
    5. Recalls that the Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property emphasizes its undisturbed natural processes and the consequent richness in dead wood, standing and on the ground, which leads to a high diversity of fungi and saproxylic invertebrates;
    6. Requests the State Party of Poland to submit to the Committee an evaluation of potential impacts on the amendments to the Forest Management Plan on the OUV of the property, taking into account all forms of conservation applicable to the site and the positions and options of local communities and stakeholders, in the context of the sustainable development of the Białowieża Forest region;
    7. Takes note of the conclusions of the IUCN Advisory Mission and underlines the need for the State Party to consider the conclusions with all relevant stakeholders;
    8. Also requests the State Party of Poland to take any necessary measures to maintain the continuity and integrity of protected old-growth forest in Białowieża Forest and to ensure that no commercial timber extraction is permitted within the entirety of the Polish part of the property and considers that such commercial timber extraction would represent a potential danger to the property in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    9. Notes that a transboundary Steering Committee for the property has been established which will be tasked with the preparation of a transboundary Management Plan for the property, and reiterates its request to the States Parties of Belarus and Poland to prepare such a plan as a matter of priority in order to ensure a coordinated approach to the management of the property and to guarantee that no actions can be allowed within the entire property that could negatively impact on its OUV;
    10. Further requests the States Parties to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6756 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.93 Pirin National Park (Bulgaria) (N 225bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.73, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
    3. Welcomes the progress achieved by the State Party with the implementation of the recommendations of the 2011 mission and requests the State Party to fully implement all pending recommendations;
    4. Also welcomes the confirmation that the draft Management Plan for Pirin National Park will be subject to the procedures for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Appropriate Assessment (AA), as requested in its Decision 38 COM 7B.73, but notes with concern the conclusion of the Ministry of Environment and Water that the first draft of the Management Plan did not comply with the requirements set out by the Ministry and was therefore sent back for revision;
    5. Notes the information provided by the State Party that all projects within the buffer zone of the property are subject to Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and that the projects approved in 2014 and 2015 were mainly related to the maintenance of existing infrastructure and the enhancement of visitors’ safety and of the quality of tourist services;
    6. Considers that any future developments within the buffer zone of the property need to be guided through strategic planning, which can be achieved by strengthening the Management Plan through the procedures for SEA and also requests the State Party:
      1. to ensure that the draft Management Plan is revised to comply with the requirements set out by the Ministry of Environment and Water and is evaluated through the procedures for SEAs,
      2. to submit the Management Plan and the results of its evaluation through the procedures for SEA and AAs to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN,
      3. tto provide the World Heritage Centre information on other ongoing processes, that might affect the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property,
      4. not to approve any further developments within the property or its buffer zone until the draft Management Plan has been subject to the procedures for SEA and AA;
    7. Calls on the State Party to invite in 2017 an IUCN Advisory mission to review the implementation of the Management Plan and the preservation of the OUV of the property;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6757 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.94 Gros Morne National Park (Canada) (N 419) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.18 and 38 COM 7B.74, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions respectively,
    3. Requests the State Party to ensure that substantive measures are introduced before the existing moratorium on onshore and onshore-based petroleum exploration using hydraulic fracturing expires, in order to prevent any future oil or gas licences from being issued inside the property, or issued outside the property where they could adversely impact its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV);
    4. Notes that the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for the western portion of the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Area, which is adjacent to the property, was nearing completion when the IUCN World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment was published and that therefore, an assessment of impacts on OUV was not included in the SEA;
    5. Nevertheless, also requests the State Party to incorporate into the SEA, through an addendum or other appropriate means, an assessment of the impacts on the OUV of the property, including its conditions of integrity, and to identify appropriate measures to ensure that any such impacts are avoided or adequately mitigated;
    6. Also notes that the State Party, in consultation with the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, concluded that the existing legislation and regulation provides a sufficient and effective framework to ensure the long term protection of the property without defining a buffer zone, but considers that the property may no longer be adequately protected against oil and gas exploration if the aforementioned moratorium expires before other appropriate protection measures are in place, and therefore further requests the State Party to consider establishing an appropriate buffer zone as part of wider protection measures;
    7. Reiterates its request to the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to assess the risks to the property’s OUV of petroleum exploration in its vicinity, in case the moratorium on acceptance of such applications is discontinued without putting in place other appropriate measures for maintaining the OUV of the property;
    8. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6779 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.95 Plitvice Lakes National Park (Croatia) (N 98bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Notes with concern the significant expansion of tourism facilities within the property and the fact that the concerns of the management authority of the property with regards to the procedures for issuing construction permits have not been addressed by the relevant planning authorities;
    3. Considers that the scale of development of tourism facilities that has taken place in the property since 2014 represents a potential danger to its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    4. Notes the information that an administrative supervision will be carried out in order to evaluate the issuing of construction permits for facilities within the property by the regional planning authority, and urges the State Party to undertake such an evaluation of procedures and competences as a matter of priority and to ensure that no new permits are issued until this process has been completed and proposed developments are confirmed to not have a negative impact on the OUV of the property;
    5. Requests the State Party to ensure, through the development of appropriate mechanisms, that the management authority of the property is included in the future decision-making processes regarding permissions for any development within the property;
    6. Also requests the State Party to develop a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the Spatial Plan for the Plitvice Lakes National Park, including a specific assessment of potential impacts on the OUV and integrity of the property, in line with IUCN’s Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, in order to inform the measures required to ensure the adequate protection of the OUV of the property;
    7. Further requests the State Party to invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property to evaluate the threat posed to the property’s OUV by the recent expansion of tourism facilities within the property, provide recommendations to the State Party with regards to the SEA, and to confirm whether the property meets the conditions for inscription on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    8. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6758 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.96 Golden Mountains of Altaï (Russian Federation) (N 768rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.21, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Welcomes the State Party’s ongoing commitment to the recommendations of the 2012 mission and the progress made in this regard, and requests the State Party to continue its efforts in the implementation of the mission recommendations;
    4. While noting the information provided by the State Party that no construction works on the Altai gas pipeline have been ongoing, reiterates its utmost concern that no firm decision has been made to abandon the Altai gas pipeline route, which would cross the property and reiterates its request to the State Party to take an unequivocal decision to abandon the construction of the Altai gas pipeline through the property and urges the States Parties of the Russian Federation and China to consider alternative routes for gas supply projects;
    5. Reiterates its position that any decision to go forward with the Altai gas pipeline through the property would represent an ascertained danger to its Outstanding Universal Value (OUV), in line with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines, and would represent a clear case for inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    6. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to ensure that Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs), including assessments of impacts on the OUV of the property, in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, be submitted to the World Heritage Centre for any infrastructure development in or around the property, which could affect its OUV, in line with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines;
    7. Also reiterates its concern about Decree 212 N 202 dated 2 August 2012 of the Republic of Altai, which allows the “construction and exploitation of linear objects as well as structures that are an integral part of the process” and therefore weakens the legal provisions protecting the property; emphasizes that, in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines, the modification of legal protection status of an area included in a property is considered as a potential danger to its OUV and a reason for inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger, and urges the State Party to revoke this decree;
    8. Commends the States Parties of the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan on further progress in transboundary conservation efforts and strongly encourages all States Parties of the Altai region to consolidate existing transboundary conservation efforts, including under the World Heritage Convention, and to seek advice from the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies, as required;
    9. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property, in particular the status of the Altai gas pipeline project, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to considering, in case of the confirmation of ascertained or potential danger to Outstanding Universal Value, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6759 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.97 Lake Baikal (Russian Federation) (N 754) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decisions 38 COM 7B.76 and 39 COM 7B.22, adopted at its 38th (Doha, 2014) and 39th (Bonn, 2015) sessions respectively,
    3. Welcomes the information that according to the recent amendments to the Federal Law on Environmental Impact Reviews a federal level EIA will be required for any construction and reconstruction project within the natural region around Lake Baikal and that the Water protection zone and the Fisheries protection zone of the lake were extended;
    4. Also welcomes the confirmation that the license of the LLC “Invest-Euro-Company” for the Kholodninskoye deposit was suspended, that the application was officially withdrawn by the company, and that exploration or development of any new deposits within the Central Ecological Zone of Baikal’s natural territory is prohibited, in line with the Committee’s established position that mining and mineral exploration are incompatible with World Heritage status;
    5. Commends the State Party for its efforts to combat the wildfires that occurred in the Baikal region in 2015, but notes with concern that although the natural values of the lake were not significantly damaged, a number of protected areas around the lake appear to have been significantly affected, which could have negatively impacted the integrity of the property, and urges the State Party to assess the impacts from the fires on the Lake ecosystem, taking into account the interrelationship between the lake waters and the forests around the lake, which are included in the property;
    6. Further welcomes the information that new guidelines are being prepared for the future development of management plans for all protected areas around Lake Baikal, and encourages the State Party to build on this process in order to develop an integrated management plan for the property, which should include a fire management and prevention plan;
    7. Also notes with concern the large number of tourism infrastructure projects planned in the special economic zones “Gates of Baikal” and “Baikal Harbours”, requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre the results of the Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) for each zone for review by IUCN, and reiterates its request to the State Party to undertake a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of all special economic zones within the property, in order to guide all future developments in a coherent manner consistent with the conservation of the property’s OUV, and also urges the State Party to ensure that all EIAs and the SEA include a specific assessment of impacts on OUV in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and identify alternatives that will not have negative impacts on the OUV of the property, and that the SEA takes into account cumulative impacts of all existing and proposed developments;
    8. Regrets that the State Party did not report on the development of a detailed EIA on the future use of the Baikal Paper and Pulp Mill site and its impact on the OUV of the property, as was requested its Decision 38 COM 7B.76 and reiterated in its Decision 39 COM 7B.22, and further urges the State Party to develop such an assessment as a matter of priority and to submit a copy of it to the World Heritage Centre for review by IUCN as soon as it is completed;
    9. Further notes with concern the recent scientific information about alarming ecological changes in Lake Baikal, including algae and cyanobacteria blooms, and also requests the State Party to develop a property-wide ecological monitoring system in order to identify the causes of such changes and the responses required to preserve the ecological integrity of the Lake;
    10. Also regrets that the State Party did not provide any information on the existing provisions and regulations for water use and management in Lake Baikal, as was requested in its Decision 39 COM 7B.22 in line with the recommendation of the 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission, notes furthermore with concern that a draft Resolution of the Government of the Russian Federation “On maximum and minimum water level of Lake Baikal” has recently been prepared which, if adopted, could have implications for the management and protection of the property and could have potential direct impacts on its OUV, and urges furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre detailed information on the current status of the proposed legislation, as well as the assessment that was used to define the proposed water levels, including an assessment of potential impacts on the OUV of the property, including on its freshwater ecosystem and biodiversity, in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment, and not to approve the legislation until these assessments have been reviewed by IUCN;
    11. Further regrets that the State Party of Mongolia did not provide updated information on the implementation of other recommendations of the 2015 Reactive Monitoring mission, and also reiterates its requests to the State Party of Mongolia to:
      1. Ensure that the EIA developed for the Egiin Gol Project includes assessment of potential impacts not only on the hydrology, but also on the ecological processes and biodiversity of the property, and specifically on its OUV, and to provide the full EIA report to the World Heritage Centre,
      2. Ensure that the Terms of Reference developed for the preparation of EIAs for the Shuren Hydropower Plant and the Orkhon River projects include a specific assessment of any potential impacts of the projects on the OUV and integrity of the property,
      3. Provide to the World Heritage Centre the EIAs for the Shuren Hydropower Plant and Orkhon river reservoir complex,
      4. Develop an assessment of cumulative impacts of any planned dams and reservoirs in the Selenge river basin that may have an impact on the OUV and integrity of the property and to provide this assessment to the World Heritage Centre,
      5. Not approve any of the projects until the above-mentioned EIAs and assessment of cumulative impacts have been reviewed by the World Heritage Centre and IUCN;
    12. Further reiterates its request to the States Parties of the Russian Federation and Mongolia to jointly develop a SEA for any future hydropower and water management projects which could potentially affect the property, taking into account any existing and planned projects on the territory of both countries;
    13. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6760 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.98 Natural System of Wrangel Island Reserve (Russian Federation) (N 1023rev) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.25, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Regrets that the State Party did not invite a joint World Heritage Centre/IUCN Reactive Monitoring mission to the property and reiterates its request to the State Party to invite this mission, as a matter of urgency;
    4. Welcomes the information that activities aimed at the removal of garbage from past human presence have been undertaken and that further activities are planned in that regard for 2016-2017;
    5. Expresses its utmost concern over the ongoing construction of facilities within the property and the associated increased human presence on the island and the potential impacts thereof on the sensitive arctic environment of Wrangel Island, and considers that this poses a potential danger to the property, in accordance with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    6. Urges the State Party to halt the construction of facilities and any associated activities until their impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property have been assessed through rigorous Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs), and requests the State Party to submit these EIAs to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN;
    7. Notes confirmation that oil exploration and exploitation are prohibited within the property and that in the past, seismic exploration vessels incidentally entered the waters of the property only in order to seek shelter from storms, but also regrets that no information was provided on the current status of the oil exploration projects that are planned or ongoing in the vicinity of the property, nor any EIAs were submitted to the World Hersitage Centre;
    8. Also reiterates its request to the State Party to provide detailed information on the current status of any ongoing and planned oil exploration projects in the vicinity of the property and to submit EIAs for such projects, including specific assessment of their potential impacts on the OUV of the property, in line with IUCN’s Advice Note of Environmental Assessment;
    9. Notes with concern that additional tourism infrastructure is planned within the property and also requests the State Party to provide detailed information on any planned tourism infrastructure, including EIAs of any such projects;
    10. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017, with a view to consider, in the case of a lack of significant progress in addressing the above-mentioned issues, the possible inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6761 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.99 Virgin Komi Forests (Russian Federation) (N 719) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.23, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Reiterates its established position that mining exploration and exploitation are incompatible with World Heritage status, and requests the State Party to ensure that no mining exploration or exploitation will be permitted within the boundaries of the property as established at the time of inscription;
    4. Reiterates its requests to the State Party to revoke the mining exploration and exploitation licenses granted for the Chudnoe gold mine and urges the State Party to restore the areas damaged by the mining-related activities, which were undertaken in 2011 and 2012;
    5. Notes the information provided by the State Party regarding the management plan for the property, but considers that the submitted individual business plans prepared for Yugyd Va National Park and Pechoro-Ilychsky State Nature Reserve do not constitute an integrated management plan for the property and also requests the State Party to develop such a plan for the property as a whole and submit it to the World Heritage Centre, for review by IUCN;
    6. Also notes the information on activities undertaken by the State Party in the field of tourism management and monitoring, expresses its concern over the high number of registered violations of the protection regime within the property and also urges the State Party to develop a comprehensive sustainable tourism management strategy for the entire property;
    7. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6762 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.100 Volcanoes of Kamchatka (Russian Federation) (N 765) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 7B.20, adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Welcomes the confirmation that no hydropower projects are planned within the property or in adjacent areas and that the Government of Kamchatka has been requested to consider alternative power sources;
    4. Acknowledges the measures undertaken by the State Party in the field of species monitoring and requests the State Party to continue its efforts;
    5. Also welcomes the information provided by the State Party that there have been no changes to the boundaries of the four components of the property which are regional nature parks, as well as the provided cartographic material, but notes however that there continues to be some discrepancy between the total area of the four nature parks reported by the State Party in its state of conservation report and in its 2014 Periodic Report, and also requests the State Party to clarify the total area of each component of the property and explain any discrepancies;
    6. Notes with concern the conclusion of the State Party that the property might be threatened in the future by increasing illegal hunting and fishing, and urges the State Party to increase anti-poaching activities in the entire property and to provide the necessary resources for these activities;
    7. Notes with utmost concern that the areas of the four nature parks are also threatened by hunting and fishing within their boundaries, and further requests the State Party to consider strengthening the protection regime of the four regional nature parks of the property, as recommended by the 2007 mission, and to submit to the World Heritage Centre, as a matter of urgency, detailed information on the current zoning regime of each nature park and on the allowed activities in each zone;
    8. Also urges the State Party to ensure that no activities, that could negatively affect its Outstanding Universal Value and integrity, are permitted within the boundaries of the property;
    9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6763 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.101 Western Caucasus (Russian Federation) (N 900 The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decisions 37 COM 7B.23 and 38 COM 7B.77, adopted at its 37th (Phnom Penh, 2013) and 38th (Doha, 2014) sessions, respectively,
    3. Welcomes the information provided by the State Party concerning the reintroduction of the Persian leopard, and encourages the State Party to continue its efforts in that regard, in consultation with the IUCN Species Survival Commission Reintroduction Specialist Group;
    4. Notes the information provided by the State Party that amendments to a number of federal legal provisions concerning protected areas have been proposed and are currently being considered by the Russian parliament, and requests the State Party to provide further details on the proposed amendments, including on how they are related to past legislative changes over which concerns were raised in previous Committee Decisions, namely the Federal Law N°406-FZ and the Order of the Government of the Russian Federation No 603-r;
    5. Notes with concern further legislative changes, specifically the amendments adopted by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Ecology in 2015 to the Decrees on the Sochi National Park and the Sochi Federal Wildlife Refuge, providing for expansion of recreational zones and construction of large scale tourism infrastructure in these protected areas, which adjoin the property, and considers that such amendments could have negative impacts on the property, including on the efforts to reintroduce the Persian leopard in the property by disrupting the connectivity of its natural habitat;
    6. Also notes the information provided by the State Party that no new capital infrastructure projects are planned on the Lagonaki Plateau or on the slopes of Mount Fisht or Mount Oshten and that the recovery of the Lagonaki Plateau from past excessive grazing continues to show a positive dynamic, and also reiterates its position that the installation of capital construction on the Lagonaki Plateau, including Mount Fisht and Oshten, would constitute a case for inscription of the property on the List of World Heritage in Danger, in line with Paragraph 180 of the Operational Guidelines;
    7. Regrets that the State Party did not provide any updated information on progress achieved to prevent logging in the entire property, including sanitary cuttings within the nature monuments, and also reiterates its request to the State Party to implement the recommendation of the 2012 mission in that regard, namely to “adapt the “certificates” of the “Nature Monuments” included in the property to ensure all logging, including sanitary cutting, construction of roads, overpasses, power lines and other communication infrastructure are not allowed and the construction of capital construction projects for recreational use is prohibited”;
    8. Further reiterates its request to the State Party to implement all other recommendations of the 2012 mission;
    9. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6764 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.102 Giant’s Causeway and Causeway Coast (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) (N 369)
  • Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 7B.80, adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Notes the updated information regarding the planned golf resort development project that may affect the property, requests the State Party to ensure that the World Heritage Centre is informed if this development begins to be implemented, and welcomes the State Party’s intentions to notify the Committee if any new proposal is submitted;
  • Urges the State Party to ensure that any new proposal submitted by the new land owner is assessed in terms of their potential impact on the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property in accordance with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environment Assessment;
  • Also notes that Rathlin Energy Limited has terminated the petroleum exploration licence, which overlapped with the boundaries of the property, and acknowledges that the State Party will apply Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines when considering future licences;
  • Reiterates its position that oil and gas exploration or exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the commitments made by industry leaders such as Shell and Total to not undertake such activities within World Heritage properties, and also requests the State Party to ensure that such activities will not be permitted to take place within World Heritage properties, and that any such activities taking place outside a World Heritage property do not result in negative impacts on its OUV;
  • Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6765 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.103 Gough and Inaccessible Islands (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) (N 740bis) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 33 COM 7B.32, adopted at its 33rd session (Seville, 2009),
    3. Notes with significant concern the rate of decline of seabird populations on Gough Island, including Atlantic petrel and Tristan albatross due to predation on chicks by the invasive house mouse ;
    4. Requests the State Party to take urgent action to eradicate mice from the island and urges the State Party to make a firm commitment to allocate sufficient funds for the rapid implementation of the house mouse eradication project;
    5. Appreciates however that the procumbent pearlwort (Sagina procumbens) eradication programme has been almost continuously implemented since 2009, and also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre updated information on the current status of the species on the island and details of the further five-year eradication campaign;
    6. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6766 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.104 Grand Canyon National Park (United States of America) (N 75) The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B.Add,
    2. Welcomes the State Party’s decision to not authorize the Tusayan residential and commercial development, which had the potential to impact the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the property;
    3. Also welcomes the establishment in 2012 of a 20-year uranium mining withdrawal from 400,000 hectares of land around the Grand Canyon and the ongoing 15-year scientific study to better understand environmental impacts from uranium mining near the property;
    4. Notes with significant concern that there are 11 consented uranium mining proposals in the area surrounding the property that are exempt from the 20-year withdrawal due to valid existing rights, and considers that such mining activities, if they were to proceed, could have significant direct and cumulative impacts on the OUV of the property;
    5. Reiterates its position that mineral exploration or exploitation is incompatible with World Heritage status, which is supported by the International Council of Mining and Metals’ (ICMM) Position Statement;
    6. Requests the State Party to ensure that Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) are completed for the proposed uranium mining developments, particularly prior to resuming operations for the Canyon Mine project, temporarily closed in 2013, which should include a specific assessment of the impact on the OUV, in line with IUCN’s World Heritage Advice Note on Environmental Assessment;
    7. Also notes with concern that the Grand Canyon Escalade project may have negative impacts on the OUV of the property, and also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre updated information on the status of this project and its review process;
    8. Further requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, an updated report on the state of conservation of the property and the implementation of the above, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6767 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.105 Omnibus Decision The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/7B,
    2. Takes note with satisfaction of the measures taken by the States Parties concerned to address its previous requests to mitigate the threats on the Outstanding Universal Value of the following World Heritage properties:
      • Walled City of Baku with the Shirvanshah's Palace and Maiden Tower (Azerbaijan),
      • Bolgar Historical and Archaeological Complex (Russian Federation),
      • New Lanark (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland),
      • Monumental Earthworks of Poverty Point (United States of America);
    3. Encourages the States Parties concerned to pursue their efforts to ensure the conservation of World Heritage properties;
    4. Recalling the benefits to States Parties of systematically utilizing Heritage Impact Assessments (HIAs) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) in the review of development projects, also encourages States Parties to integrate the EIA/HIA processes into legislation, planning mechanisms and management plans, and reiterates its recommendation to States Parties to use these tools in assessing projects, including assessment of cumulative impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value of properties, as early as possible and before any final decision is taken;
    5. Reminds the States Parties concerned to inform the World Heritage Centre in due course about any major development project that may negatively impact the Outstanding Universal Value of a property, before any irreversible decisions are made, in line with Paragraph 172 of the Operational Guidelines.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6768 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 7B.106 World Heritage properties in Libya The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/7B and WHC/16/40.COM/7,
    2. Deplores the conflict situation prevailing in the country and the loss of human lives;
    3. Commends the State Party for making strong commitments for conservation of its properties but expresses its utmost concern with regard to the damage occurred and the threats to the five World Heritage properties of Libya;
    4. Considers that the optimal conditions required to ensure the conservation and protection of the Outstanding Universal Value of these properties are not present anymore and that the latter are, consequently, threatened by both ascertained and potential danger, in accordance with paragraphs 177 to 179 of the Operational Guidelines ;
    5. Decides, in conformity with Article 11.4 of the Convention and Paragraphs 177 and 179 of the Operational Guidelines, to inscribe the Archaeological Site of Cyrene, the Archaeological Site of Leptis Magna, the Archaeological Site of Sabratha, the Old Town of Ghadamès and the Rock-Art Sites of Tadrart Acacus (Libya) on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    6. Requests the State Party to systematically gather, to the extent possible, the information relating to all the damages to the World Heritage properties in order to document the state of conservation of these properties;
    7. Also requests the State Party to invite the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to carry out a mission to Libya as soon as the security conditions permit, in order to assess the state of conservation of the properties and elaborate, in consultation with the State Party, an action plan for their restauration;
    8. Further requests the State Party in consultation with the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies to prepare, as soon as the situation allows, the corrective measures as well as a Desired state of conservation for the removal of the properties from the List of World Heritage in Danger, once a return to stability is effective in the country;
    9. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 February 2017, a detailed report on the state of conservation of each of the five World Heritage properties of Libya, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6769 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8A Tentative Lists submitted by States Parties as of 15 April 2016, in conformity with the <em>Operational Guidelines</em> The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/8A,
    2. Stressing the importance of the process of revision and updating of Tentative Lists, as a tool for regional harmonisation of the World Heritage List and of long-term planning of its development;
    3. Encourages States Parties to seek as early as possible upstream advice from the Advisory Bodies during the development or revision of their Tentative Lists as appropriate;
    4. Takes note of the Tentative Lists presented in Annexes 2 and 3 of this document.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6819 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8A Tentative Lists submitted by States Parties as of 15 April 2016, in conformity with the <em>Operational Guidelines</em> The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/8A,
    2. Stressing the importance of the process of revision and updating of Tentative Lists, as a tool for regional harmonisation of the World Heritage List and of long-term planning of its development;
    3. Encourages States Parties to seek as early as possible upstream advice from the Advisory Bodies during the development or revision of their Tentative Lists as appropriate;
    4. Takes note of the Tentative Lists presented in Annexes 2 and 3 of this document.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6820 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.1 Changes to names of properties inscribed on the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/8B,
    2. Approves the name change to Climats, terroirs of Burgundy as proposed by the French authorities. The name of the property becomes The Climats, terroirs of Burgundy in English and Les Climats du vignoble de Bourgogne in French.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6780 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.2 Changes to names of properties inscribed on the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/8B,
    2. Approves the name change to Champagne Hillsides, Houses and Cellars as proposed by the French authorities. The name of the property in French becomes Coteaux, Maisons et Caves de Champagne.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6781 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.3 Changes to names of properties inscribed on the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/8B,
    2. Approves the name change to Lines and Geoglyphs of Nasca and Pampas de Jumana as proposed by the Peruvian authorities. The name of the property becomes Lines and Geoglyphs of Nasca and Palpa in English and Lignes et Géoglyphes au Nasca et Palpa in French.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6782 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.4 Changes to names of properties inscribed on the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/8B,
    2. Approves the name change to the Historic Town of Vigan as proposed by the Philippine authorities. The name of the property in English becomes Historic City of Vigan.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6783 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.5 Changes to names of properties inscribed on the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Document WHC/16/40.COM/8B,
    2. Approves the name change to Historic Centre of Oporto as proposed by the Portuguese authorities. The name of the property becomes Historic Centre of Oporto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar in English and Centre historique de Porto, Pont Luiz I et Monastère de Serra do Pilar in French.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6784 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.6 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B.Add and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 8B.3 adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Inscribes Sanganeb Marine National Park and Dungonab Bay – Mukkawar Island Marine National Park, Sudan, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (vii), (ix) and (x);
    4. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:
    Brief synthesis
    The Sanganeb Marine National Park (SMNP) and Dungonab Bay – Mukkawar Island Marine National Park, Sudan (DMNP) is located in the northern part of the Red Sea and lies within the Far Western Indo-Pacific biogeographic region. The property’s marine systems, fauna and flora are from an Indian Ocean origin, however, due to its semi-enclosed nature, it has developed unique and different ecosystems and species not found elsewhere. Thus the property is distinctive and unique because of its high number of species, diverse number of habitats, high endemism, and remoteness.
    The property contains impressive natural phenomena, reef formations and areas of great natural beauty and is relatively undisturbed. The area serves as a standard to assess the health of the central Red Sea’s regional ecosystems. As an excellent example of a coral deep water offshore reef, Sanganeb provides an outstanding example for comparative studies with similar systems in other regions including the Indian and Pacific Oceans and a place to understand the interactions of biota and environment. Located within the Red Sea’s centre of biodiversity the remarkable clarity of the water makes it one of the best diving sites in the Red Sea and indeed the world.
    The two components of the property are connected by a coastal stretch extending 125 km including mersas, inlets, fringing reefs and off-shore reef formations, and the whole serial site is geologically and ecologically connected via the open flows that facilitate the exchange of biotic and abiotic elements within the marine ecosystems of the Red Sea. It encompasses a large bay that contains islands, several small islets and some of the most northerly coral reefs in the world associated with species (including seagrass and mangroves) at the limits of their global range and evolutionary expansion, which are therefore important from a scientific and conservation perspective.
    Sanganeb atoll is the only atoll-like feature in the Red Sea, and a submerged and overhanging predator dominated coral reef ecosystem. It consists of 13 different bio-physiographic reef zones, each providing typical coral reef assemblages, supporting a wealth of marine life and breathtaking underwater vistas, hosting at least 361 fish species with numerous endemic and rare species. Besides providing important nurseries and spawning grounds for key species, it also hosts resident populations of dolphins, sharks and marine turtles, which use the atoll as a resting, breeding and feeding area.
    Dungonab Bay, including Mukkawar Island and other islands, contains an array of habitat types, such as extensive coral reef complexes, mangroves, seagrasses and intertidal and mudflat areas which all enable the survival (breeding, feeding and resting) of endangered dugong, sharks, manta rays, dolphins and migratory birds. The Bay exhibits overlying fossil reefs, sometimes up to 150m high, and contains fish and coral communities more usually separated by several hundred kilometers.
    Criterion (vii): The property contains impressive natural phenomena, formations and areas of great natural beauty and is a relatively undisturbed area that serves as a standard to assess the health of the central Red Sea’s regional ecosystems. As an exemplary example of a coral deep water offshore reef, Sanganeb provides an outstanding opportunity for comparative studies with similar systems in other regions including the Indian and Pacific Oceans and a place to understand the interactions of biota and environment. Located within the Red Sea’s centre of biodiversity the remarkable clarity of the water makes it one of the best diving sites in the Red Sea and indeed the world.
    Sanganeb is an isolated, atoll-shaped coral reef structure in the central Red Sea, 25 km off the shoreline of Sudan. Surrounded by 800 m deep water, the atoll-like coral reef systems are part of the northernmost coral reef systems in the world. Sanganeb is a largely pristine marine ecosystem providing some of the most impressive underwater vistas resulting from the very high diversity of physiographic zones and reefs characterized by an extraordinary structural complexity. Dungonab Bay and Mukkawar Island is situated 125 km north of Port Sudan and includes within its boundaries a highly diverse system of coral reefs, mangroves, seagrass beds, beaches, intertidal areas, islands and islets. The clear visibility of the water, coral diversity, marine species and pristine habitats and colorful coral reef communities create a striking land- and seascape.
    Criterion (ix): The property is located in an ecologically and globally outstanding region, the Red Sea, which is the world’s northernmost tropical sea, is the warmest and most saline of the world´s seas, and is a Global 200 priority biogeographic region. The serial site is also located in a priority marine province, the Gulf of Aden.
    The property is part of a larger transition area between northern and southern Red Sea biogeographic zones and contains diverse and mostly undisturbed habitats which are outstanding examples of the northernmost tropical coral reef system on earth. The property and its surrounding area include reef systems (13 different bio-physiographic reef zones in Sanganeb Marine National Park (SMNP)), the only atoll-like feature in the Red Sea, lagoons, islets, sand flats, seagrass beds, and mangrove habitats and display a diversity of reefs, from living reefs to ancient fossil reefs. These habitats are home to populations of seabirds (20 species), marine mammals (11 species), fish (300 species), corals (260 species), sharks, manta rays and marine turtles, and the site provides important feeding grounds for what is perhaps the most northerly population of endangered Dugong. SMNP is an important larvae source area and hosts spawning sites for commercial fish species.
    Criterion (x): Dungonab Bay – Mukkawar Marine National Park (DMNP) supports a globally significant dugong population, given that the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf host the last remaining healthy populations of this species in the Indian Ocean. The whale and manta ray seasonal aggregations in DMNP are unique to the entire Western Indian Ocean Region and the marine park is internationally recognized as an Important Bird Area for both resident and migratory birds. DMNP is also unique as a home to species from different biogeographic origins: both northern and southern Red Sea species. SMNP lies in a regional hotspot for reef fish endemism. The property generally supports a higher than average subset of endemics found in the Red Sea, including the richest diversity of coral west of India and a number of coral species which are at the limits of their global range.
    Integrity
    The property is an outstanding marine ecosystem that sustains an intact ecological setup and interacting biological processes, and is in need of long-term conservation support for its unique diversity and endemism. It covers both shallow habitats and reef formations and deep-sea areas that are ecologically interacting by natural exchange.
    The property’s size is adequate to contain most of the attributes that convey Outstanding Universal Value and meets the requirements of integrity. It maintains a high level of intactness through long-term conservation of its biodiversity. The total area of the property is 199,524 ha (SMNP: 692 ha; DMNP 198,832 ha). The property is surrounded by a buffer zone with a total size of 401,136 ha which consists of a marine area of 321,983 ha and a terrestrial buffer zone of some 79,153 ha. Sanganeb atoll is relatively remote from land-based activities and the traditional artisanal fishing around it is under the control of the Fisheries Administration of Sudan. Dungonab Bay marine waters are protected by Wildlife Administration and Fisheries regulations. If these regulations are not promptly enforced, Dungonab Bay is likely to suffer negative impacts on the biota from the activities of the two villages at the coast, from major land use changes, salt exploitation, oyster farming, and potentially pearling. Species which are likely to be affected are coral and fish species, turtles, manta rays, sharks, dolphins, dugongs, and birds. The property has not shown any invasive or non-resident species as yet.
    Protection and management requirements
    The Government of Sudan has a legal commitment at both the National and State levels towards the protection and conservation of resources within its coastal waters through its comprehensive National Strategy. Several laws and regulations are in place and Sudan has signed regional and international protocols and conventions. Both SMNP (1990) and DMNP (2004) have been declared as marine protected areas by Presidential Decrees. Both are the responsibility of the Government of Sudan and various pieces of national legislation pertain to the property including the Federal Environmental Law (2001); State Environmental Law (2006); Wildlife Conservation and National Park Act, (1987); National Parks, Sanctuaries and Reserves Regulation, (1939); and the Game Protection and Federal Parks Act (1986). Other laws govern matters related to wildlife protection, fisheries, shipping and water quality. It is noteworthy to mention that the property has also been internationally recognised as a Ramsar site since 2003.
    The management plan for Dungonab Bay and Mukkawar Island Marine National Park is already updated while the management plan for Sanganeb Marine National Park is currently in the process of being updated. However, an integrated Management framework for the property is under discussion at national level to complement the two individual management plans in the near future. Local communities’ participation and other stakeholders are consulted by the management authority during the updating of the two management plans. This community participation will be a corner stone for the development of the integrated management plan. The management authority acknowledges the importance to monitor the impacts of tourism on ecosystems and on local communities through the implementation of a Tourism Strategy.
    5.  Commends the efforts made by the State Party to review the boundaries of the property, update the Sanganeb Marine National Park management plan and otherwise strengthen protection and management in order to bring forward the country’s first natural World Heritage property;
    6.  Requests the State Party to:
    a) complete the work to update the management plan for Dungonab Bay Marine National Park to complete the preparation of an integrated management framework for the whole property that guides coordinated inter-agency policy and management and promotes the effective involvement of different stakeholders including local communities by December 2017.
    b) provide the World Heritage Centre with high quality resolution maps that clearly define the boundaries of the property and the buffer zone by 1 December 2017,
    c) work with the support of IUCN to identify additional areas of potential Outstanding Universal Value that may be considered for future extension of the property,
    d) continue to increase financial resources to support the operational aspects of effective management of the property and provide assurance to the World Heritage Committee on commitments to maintain ongoing sustainable financing;

    7.  Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, a report on implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.

    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6785 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.7 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes Hubei Shennongjia, China on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (ix) and (x);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:
    4. Commends the State Party for its efforts to improve the conservation of the property and in particular its expeditious actions to expand the property in the Badong County area and implement a range of ecological connectivity measures to improve integrity during the evaluation process;

      Brief synthesis

      Hubei Shennongjia is located in the Shennongjia Forestry District and Badong County in China’s Hubei Province. Shennongjia is on the ecotone from the plains and foothill regions of eastern China to the mountainous region of central China. It is also situated along a zone of climate transition, where the climate shifts from the subtropical zone to warm temperate zone, and where warm and cold air masses from north and south meet and are controlled by the Subtropical Gyre.

      The property covers 73,318 ha and consists of two components, the larger Shennongding/Badong component in the west and the smaller Laojunshan component to the east. A buffer zone of 41,536 ha surrounds the property. Hubei Shennongjia includes 11 types of vegetation which are characterized by a diversity of altitudinal gradients. The Shennongjia region is considered to be one of three centres of endemic plant species in China, a reflection of its geographical transitional position which has shaped its biodiversity, ecosystems and biological evolution. Hubei Shennongjia exhibits globally impressive levels of species richness and endemism especially within its flora, 3,767 vascular plant species have been recorded including a remarkable 590 temperate plant genera. In addition, 205 plant species and 2 genera are endemic to the property, and 1,793 species endemic to China. Among the fauna, more than 600 vertebrate species have been recorded including 92 mammal, 399 bird, 55 fish, 53 reptile and 37 amphibian species. 4,365 insect species have been identified. The property includes numerous rare and endangered species such as the Golden or Sichuan Snub-nosed Monkey, Clouded Leopard, Common Leopard, Asian Golden Cat, Dhole, Asian Black Bear, Indian Civet, Musk Deer, Chinese Goral and Chinese Serow, Golden Eagle, Reeve’s Pheasant and the world’s largest amphibian the Chinese Giant Salamander.

      Shennongjia has been a place of significant scientific interest and its mountains have featured prominently in the history of botanical inquiry. The site has a special status for botany and has been the object of celebrated international plant collecting expeditions conducted in the 19th and 20th centuries. From 1884 to 1889 more than 500 new species were recorded from the area. Shennongjia is also the global type location for many species.

      Criterion (ix): Hubei Shennongjia protects the largest primary forests in Central China and is one of three centres of endemic plant species in China. The property includes 11 types of vegetation and an intact altitudinal vegetation spectrum across six gradients including evergreen broad-leaved forest, mixed evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved forest, deciduous broad-leaved forest, mixed coniferous and broad-leaved forest, coniferous forest, and bush/meadow. With 874 species of deciduous woody plants, belonging to 260 genera, the tree species and genus richness of the site is unparalleled for a deciduous broadleaf forest type worldwide and within the Northern Hemisphere’s evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forests, Hubei Shennongjia contains the most complete altitudinal natural belts in the world. Hubei Shennongjia is situated in the Daba Mountains Evergreen Forests ecoregion and also within a priority ecoregion, the Southwest China Temperate Forest both of which are not yet represented on the World Heritage List. It also protects the Shennongjia regional centre of plant diversity which has been identified as a gap on the World Heritage List. In association with its floral diversity the property protects critical ecosystems for numerous rare and endangered animal species.

      Criterion (x): Hubei Shennongjia’s unique terrain and climate has been relatively little affected by glaciation and thus creates a haven for numerous rare, endangered and endemic species, as well as many of the world’s deciduous woody species. The property exhibits high levels of species richness, especially among vascular plants, and remarkably contains more than 63% of the temperate genera found across all of China, a megabiodiverse country with the world’s greatest diversity of temperate plant genera. The property includes 12.9% of the country’s vascular plant species. The mountainous terrain also contains critical habitat for a range of flagship animal species. 1,550 Golden or Sichuan Snub nosed Monkeys are recorded in the property. The Golden Snub-nosed Monkeys in Shennongjia are the most endangered of the 3 sub-species in China and are entirely restricted to the property. Other important species include Clouded Leopard, Common Leopard, Asian Golden Cat, Dhole, Asian Black Bear, Indian Civet, Musk Deer, Chinese Goral, Chinese Serow, Golden Eagle, Reeve’s Pheasant and the world’s largest amphibian the Chinese Giant Salamander. The property has extremely rich biodiversity, contains a large number of type species, and hosts numerous rare species which have been introduced into horticulture worldwide. Internationally, Shennongjia holds a special place for the study of plant systematics and horticultural science.

      Integrity

      The property covers 73,318 ha and is coincident with the majority of the Shennongjia National Nature Reserve in Shennongjia Forestry District. The larger Shennongding/Badong component in the west is 62,851 ha and includes the northern section of the Yanduhe Provincial Nature Reserve in adjoining Badong County. The Laojunshan component at 10,467 ha lies in the east. A buffer zone of 41,536 ha surrounds the property. The property is large enough to encompass all the essential components that form the unique biodiversity, biological and ecological values of the Shennongjia in Hubei. The boundaries are designated and clearly demarcated on the ground.

      The property remains in good condition and threats are generally not of significant concern. However, the division of the site by National Highway 209 and the associated 10 km wide corridor is a cause for concern as it impedes wildlife movements and ecological connectivity. The implementation of an effective conservation connectivity strategy involving wildlife corridors, stepping stones or arrays of small patches of habitat, wildlife road crossings and the removal of fences is therefore essential to facilitate ecological connectivity for mobile wildlife, especially those species which normally require sizable habitat ranges.

      Protection and management requirements

      All of the property is owned by the state and has national or provincial protection status. Hubei Shennongjia is subject to a range of national, provincial and local laws and regulations which ensure long term strict protection. A multi-level management system has been established to manage the property. The property is subject to a number of plans and has a specific Hubei Shennongjia Management Plan tailored to World Heritage requirements and aimed at safeguarding the site’s Outstanding Universal Value. The management plan needs to be updated to cover management of the Yanduhe Provincial Nature Reserve in Badong County. The management plan should in addition elaborate on measures to integrate different areas of management expertise in a coordinated way across the different protected areas and other national and international designations. The management plan should be a forward-thinking tool that supports adaptive management. Zoning systems should be reviewed to account for the specific habitat and spatial needs of key species.

      The property enjoys widespread support among all levels of Government, local people and other stakeholders. The property requires long-term, active management of the buffer zone to ensure that any developments are of an appropriate scale and design according to the values of the property. Furthermore that surrounding land uses are sympathetic to the values of the property and generate sustainable benefits to local communities. Increased attention and capacity is needed to manage issues within the buffer zone.

      A concern stems from the potential of tourism use at the property to increase significantly. Significant improvements to transport infrastructure, most notably the opening of the nearby Shennongjia Airport in 2014, has the potential to dramatically increase visitation and consequent impact. Tourism planning, management and monitoring need to anticipate increasing demand and mitigate negative impacts.

      Other threats relate to buffer zone developments and activities. Developments and encroaching landuse such as for tea cultivation need ongoing monitoring. Attention should be given to integrated conservation and community development initiatives in the buffer zones to foster stronger community stewardship of the World Heritage property.

    5. Notes that the State Party indicates that relocation of people from the property is encouraged by the Integrated Protection and Management Committee, and that such relocation from the property is a sensitive matter and therefore requests the State Party to ensure that any relocation activities are voluntary and fully respect international norms, and that further relocation activities should not be undertaken unless they are fully justified;
    6. Also requests the State Party to:
      1. continue to enhance ecological connectivity between the core habitat areas of the property through a range of measures such as wildlife crossings, corridors and habitat mosaics which facilitate wildlife movements and to ensure that management prescriptions are tailored to the specific needs of key wildlife,
      2. upgrade the legal protection to nature reserve standard of wildlife corridor and habitat stepping stone areas which are crucial to the property’s ecological integrity and consider nominating these as future extensions to the property,
      3. review the management planning system for the property to fully encompass the areas added to the property during the evaluation process, as well as the functioning of the buffer zones, and ensure an integrated and adaptive approach for the entire property,
      4. update the 2006-2015 Tourism Master Plan to ensure long-term and effective management of the anticipated increases in tourism demand, in particular to specify ecological and social carrying capacities and identify appropriate tourism infrastructure development,
      5. invest further in increased management capacity directed to the property’s buffer zone, with a particular emphasis on integrating cultural, social economic and co-management opportunities into the property’s management regime,
      6. undertake further research and inventory of key faunal populations including for example a population census of both the flagship species Golden Snub-nosed Monkey and the Giant Salamander,
      7. undertake a review of the property’s zoning system to prescribe management policies and actions tailored to the habitat and spatial needs of key species
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6786 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.8 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes Lut Desert, Islamic Republic of Iran, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (vii) and (viii):
    3. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The property Lut Desert is in the southeast of the Islamic Republic of Iran (hereinafter referred to as Iran) and straddles the three Iranian Provinces of Kermān, Sistāno Balūchestān and Khorāsān-e Jonūbi. It is an arid continental subtropical area notable for a rich variety of spectacular desert landforms. At 2,278,015 ha the area is large and is surrounded by a buffer zone of 1,794,134 ha which varies in width between 10 and 30 kms.

      In Persian language “Lut” refers to bare land without water and devoid of vegetation. The Lut Desert is situated in an interior basin surrounded by mountains, so it is in a rain shadow and, coupled with high temperatures, the climate is hyper-arid. The region often experiences Earth’s highest land surface temperatures: a temperature of 70.7C has been recorded within the property.

      The largest incoming river, the Rud-e Shur, drains a catchment to the north of the area. It is perennial but highly saline by the time it enters the core zone; so its banks are devoid of riparian vegetation and its channel is lined with salt crystals.

      A steep north-south pressure gradient develops across the region in spring and summer with the result that strong NNW-SSE winds blow across the area from between June and October each year. The long duration strong winds propel 1 mm quartz sand grains at great velocity creating transportation of sediment and aeolian erosion (by sand blasting) on a colossal scale. Consequently, the area possesses what many experts consider the world’s best examples of aeolian yardang landforms, as well as extensive stony deserts and dune fields. Yardangs are bedrock features carved and streamlined by sandblasting, although they are also eroded by gullying from rainfall runoff and by mass movement. Some are also undercut by floodwaters. Yardangs appear as massive and dramatic corrugations across the landscape with ridges and corridors oriented parallel to the dominant prevailing wind. The ridges are known as kaluts. In the Lut Desert some are up to 155 m high and their ridges can be followed for more than 40 km. Yardangs cover about one third of the area and are developed in consolidated lacustrine sediments (sands, silts, marls, evaporites) of mainly Plio-Pleistocene age that accumulated on the floor of the inland basin.

      The wind also strips hard rocky outcrops bare of soil, which leaves extensive stony desert pavements (hamada) with sand-blasted faceted stones (ventifacts) across about 12% of the area. An extensive, black stony desert covers the basaltic Gandom Beryan plateau in the northwest of the core zone. The stony deserts in eastern Lut cover (as a rubbly veneer) extensive pediplains, which are rock platforms that truncate bedrock and gently slope away from the foot of neighbouring hills.

      Sands transported by wind and washed in by intermittent streams have accumulated in the south and east, where huge sand-seas (termed rig or erg) have formed across 40% of the core zone. These areas consist of active dunes some reaching heights of 475 m. These are amongst the largest dunes in the world and are displayed in the Lut Desert in a wide variety of forms, including linear, compound crescentic, star, and funnel shaped. Where sands are trapped around the lee of plants at the slightly wetter margins of the basin, nebkhas form to 12 m or more in height, arguably being the highest in the world. Nebkhas cover about 3% of the area, particularly along its western margin.

      Dissolved minerals evaporated from incoming streams result in white efflorescences of crystals and evaporite crusts down river beds, in yardang corridors and in salt pans (playa). A variety of small scale evaporite landforms develop, especially along the edges of the Shur River where white crystalline pools are a widespread feature. Small landforms result from the pressure effects of crystal growth, including salt polygons, tepee fractured salt crusts, small salt pingos (or blisters), salt karren and gypsum domes. Various salt features are found over about 4% of the area, especially in the playa of Shurgaz-e Hamun.

      The region has been described in the past as a place of ‘no life’ and information on the biological resources in this area is limited. Nevertheless the nomination dossier documents the area’s known flora and fauna including an interesting adapted insect fauna and other species which have made their home in this extreme environment.

      Within the area, only the western edge includes settlements (there being 28 villages, the largest with just over 700 people). In the buffer zone there are 15 villages and Shahdad town with a population of nearly 6,000. The region has evidence for habitation going back 7,000 years, however this has always been around the periphery of the area, because the aridity of the core zone rendered most of it uninhabitable.

      Criterion (vii): The Lut Desert protects a globally recognized iconic hot desert landscape, one of the hottest places on earth. It is renowned for its spectacular series of landforms namely the yardangs (massive corrugated ridges) in the west of the property and the sand sea in the east. The yardangs are so large and impressive that they can be seen easily from space. Lut is particularly significant for the great variety of desert landform types found in a relatively small area. Key attributes of the aesthetic values of the unspoilt property relate to the diversity and sheer scale of its landforms; a visually stunning mosaic of desert colours; and uninterrupted vistas across huge and varied dune system that transition into large flat desert pavement areas.

      Criterion (viii): The property represents an exceptional example of ongoing geological processes related to erosional and depositional features in a hot desert. The yardang/kalut landforms are widely considered the best-expressed in the world in terms of extent, unbroken continuity and height. The Lut sand-seas are amongst the best developed active dune fields in the world, displaying a wide variety of dune types (crescentic ridges, star dunes, complex linear dunes, funnel-shaped dunes) with dunes amongst the highest observed anywhere on our planet. Nebkha dune fields (dunes formed around plants) are widespread with those at Lut as high as any measured elsewhere. Evaporite (salt) landforms are displayed in wide variety, including white salt-crusted crystalline riverbeds, salt pans (playa) with polygonally fractured crusts, pressure-induced tepee-fractured salt crusts, gypsum domes, small salt pingos (or blisters), and salt karren. Other dry-land landforms include extensive hamada (stony desert pavements or reg) usually located on pediment surfaces with wind faceted stones (ventifacts), gullied badlands and alluvial fans (bajada).

      Protection and management requirements

      Due to its remoteness from major population centres and its extreme environmental conditions, including extreme heat and lack of water, much of the Lut Desert has been largely inaccessible and therefore naturally protected. The nomination reports that, apart from some small private landholdings in villages in the area and buffer zone of western Lut, the majority of the land within the Lut Desert is state-owned. The property is subject to a complex and multi-level protection regime and a range of legislation, regulations and protective mechanisms apply (14 legal instruments). Legal protection and management is provided by state level authorities that work under their specific mandates. Three agencies principally share conservation and management responsibility for the property, namely the Forests, Range and Watershed Management Organization; Iranian Department of Environment; and the Iran Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization (ICHHTO).

      Protection of non-conservation lands, study and execution of projects of watershed and rangeland management and desertification is under the control of the Organization of Forests, Range and Watershed Management. This agency is responsible for the prevention of illegal exploitation of deserts. Two protected areas located in the northwest and southeast are under the management and protection of the Iranian Department of Environment. The Darband-e Ravar “wildlife refuge” in the northwest partially overlaps with the area but the Bobolab “no hunting” area in the southeast only overlaps with the buffer zone. In addition to management of the protected area, the Department of Environment is responsible for environmental assessment of development projects. The Lut Desert is also on the national heritage registration list of ICHHTO.

      Additionally, based on the documents provided by the State Party, ICHHTO is the sole responsible authority for the management of the property as well as coordination between all other relevant institutions. 

    4. Recommends the State Party to:
      1. progressively build technical capacity to manage the natural values of the Lut Desert in light of the intrinsic links between the property’s geomorphology, geology and its desert adapted biodiversity and ecology, and
      2. further study and assess the biodiversity and ecological values of the property with a view to considering nomination also under criteria (ix) and/or (x) at some future time;
    5. Welcomes the efforts of the State Party of the Islamic Republic of Iran and its partners to nominate the country’s first natural World Heritage property.

    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6787 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.9 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes Western Tien-Shan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criterion (x);
    3. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Western Tien-Shan represents an exceptional diversity and beauty of a mosaic of landscapes, a unique combination of different types of ecosystems, outstanding diversity of fauna and flora with a considerable proportion of endemic species and communities, as well as a large number of rare and threatened species.

      It is among most species rich sites in the Pamir-Tien-Shan Highlands province and close to half of its species are endemic to Middle Asia.

      Western Tien-Shan has an exceptional value as a centre of origin of cultivated plants. It is home to a number of wild species related to domesticated fruit plants including wild apples, apricot, pistachio, vine, plum, pear, walnut and hawthorn.

      Criterion (x): The Western Tien-Shan supports outstanding diversity of plant and animal species with high level of endemism and many species of global conservation importance.

      The vertebrate biodiversity found in the region of Western Tien Shan includes 61 species of mammals, 316 species of birds, 17 species of reptiles, 3 species of amphibians and more than 20 fish species, and almost all of these species are reported as occurring in the area of the property.

      The Western Tien-Shan supports 14 species of flora and 18 of fauna listed as globally threatened by IUCN. These include several wild relatives of today’s commercial fruit trees such as wild apricot Armeniaca vulgaris (EN), Siever’s apple Malus sieversii (VU) and walnut Juglans regia (NT), as well as other rare species, such as Crataegus knorringiana (CR); Lonicera karataviensis (CR), Betula talassica (EN), Spiraeanthus schrenkianus (EN) etc. Among the fauna, these are saker falcon Falco cherrug (EN), Egyptian vulture Neophron percnopterus (EN), cinereous vulture Aegypius monachus (NT), charismatic snow leopard Uncia uncia (EN), wild sheep Ovis ammon with two subspecies (nigrimontana at Karatau - 80% of the global population - and karelini), Menzbier’s marmot Marmota menzbieri, European marbled polecat Vormela peregusna (VU). Invertebrates have high level of endemism.

      Integrity

      Protected areas included in the property have adequate level of protection corresponding to IUCN categories Ia and II.

      Individual components of the property are sufficient to jointly maintain functioning of natural systems of Western Tien-Shan and fully represent the properties and processes that reflect their significance.

      The main pressures to the property are poaching, cattle grazing, illegal logging, haying, illegal harvesting of flowers etc. The typical kinds of natural disasters in the Western Tien-Shan are rock falls, landslides, mudslides, avalanches; droughts lead to fires in dry years. Some parts of the property are surrounded by highly populated areas and as result they have possibility for good number of visitors from one side and threat from uncontrolled recreation from other side. In all the protected areas these threats and pressures are taken into consideration in management plans and the staff is regularly trained for control and adequate reaction in case of disasters.

      Protection and management requirements

      All components of the property are state protected areas of national importance and are protected under national legislations of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. Reserves have status of strictly protected natural areas, where any use of animals and plants and any economic activities are prohibited. Also, a very limited access of visitors, obligatory accompanied by protected areas inspectors and only in specially designated areas is allowed. Sayram-Ugam national park has areas with the same strictly protected regimes as in reserves, as well areas accessible for visitors and for strictly limited use of nature. All areas of Western Tien-Shan are properties of the government, each of them have its own administration and staff and they are managed by an authorised state executive bodies of each country with funding from the state budgets.

      The property as a whole will be managed by a transboundary Steering Committee (consisting of representatives of the protected areas and of responsible governmental bodies) with the main role for coordination of conservation and management efforts, exchange of experience and information. The Committee will be established shortly after inscription of Western Tien-Shan in the World Heritage List and will work as intergovernmental group with scheduled meetings (at least once a year) and teleconferences.

    4. Requests the States Parties to:
      1. finalize the transboundary management framework for the property, which details, at an appropriate level, integrated protection and management measures including establishment of a joint steering committee and which can be implemented through the respective national level policy and planning processes, and is fully harmonized with the protection and management plans for each of the selected component parts;
      2. further develop collaboration between the States Parties in the framework of a tripartite Memorandum for management of the property to be signed between the States Parties of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, and include specific targets and timelines that would strengthen cooperation at field operational and technical levels,
      3. work in consultation with IUCN to build capacity on transnational management of the property;
      4. review and rationalize the boundaries of the components of the property and their buffer zones to ensure that they fully correspond to criterion (x), follow ecological principles and address connectivity, and submit a boundary modification proposal in due course to reflect this;
    5. Encourages the States Parties to consider the potential of the property to also meet criterion (ix);
    6. Requests the States Parties to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6788 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.10 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Defers the examination of the nomination of the Mountains Ecosystems of Koytendag, Turkmenistan, to allow the State Party to prepare a revised nomination;
    3. Encourages the State Party to work, with the support of IUCN if requested, to review other candidate natural World Heritage properties in Turkmenistan, in particular those identified in past global and regional analyses, so as to bring forward a nomination with the best possible chance of success;
    4. Recommends the State Party to:
      1. monitor grazing pressures in the designated wildlife sanctuaries to regulate stock numbers and reduce pressure on native vegetation and natural systems,
      2. more effectively plan for increasing tourism demand including the development of appropriately scaled and low impact tourism related infrastructure and ensure that proposals to establish cable car access are subject to careful consideration and rigorous environmental impact assessment,
      3. ensure that no mining prospecting licenses and/or operations will be permitted within protected areas comprising the Mountain Ecosystems of Koytendag, and its buffer zone, and that any mining activity that might impact this site is subject to rigorous Environmental and Social Impact Assessment;
    5. Encourages the States Parties of Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan to enhance collaboration in order to improve coordination between Koytendag State Nature Reserve (Turkmenistan) and the adjoining Surkhan Strict Nature Reserve (Uzbekistan), in particular to support improved transboundary management of wildlife populations, such as Markhor, which depend on ecological continuity between these two protected areas.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6789 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.11 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B.Add and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2.Add,
    2. Recalling Decision 39 COM 8B.5 adopted at its 39th session (Bonn, 2015),
    3. Takes note of the progress made by the State Party in conducting consultations with concerned stakeholders in order to achieve the widest possible support for the nomination of the property;
    4. Refers the nomination of the Kaeng Krachan Forest Complex, Thailand, back to the State Party, taking note of the strong potential for this property to meet criterion (x), in order to allow it to more fully address the concerns that have been raised by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights concerning Karen communities within the Kaeng Krachan National Park, including the implementation of a participatory process to resolve rights and livelihood concerns and to achieve a consensus of support for the nomination of the property that is fully consistent with the principle of free, prior and informed consent;
    5. Encourages the State Party to consider nominating the property also under criterion (ix);
    6. Also encourages the State Party to continue the commendable initiatives on future biological connectivity opportunities, including those between the nominated property and Thungyai - Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuaries in Thailand and, working in partnership with the State Party of Myanmar, between the nominated property and neighbouring transnational protected areas within the Taninthaya Forest Corridor in Myanmar;
    7. Recommends that the State Party continue dialogue with the State Party of Myanmar to address concerns regarding the settlement of demarcation of the proposed nominated area;
    8. Commends the State Party and partner NGOs for their increased efforts to address improved conservation management within the nominated property, including improved anti-poaching patrol systems, community engagement in Kui Buri National Park dealing with human/elephant conflict, and enhanced ecological research and monitoring, and further encourages the State Party to continue with these efforts.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6821 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.12 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes Mistaken Point, Canada, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criterion (viii);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Mistaken Point is a globally significant Ediacaran fossil site almost entirely located within Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve on the south-eastern tip of the island of Newfoundland in eastern Canada. The 146-hectare property consists of a narrow, 17-kilometre-long strip of rugged naturally-eroding coastal cliffs, with an additional 74 hectares adjoining its landward margin designated as a buffer zone. The superbly exposed, 2-kilometre-thick rock sequence of deep marine origin at Mistaken Point dates to the middle Ediacaran Period (580 to 560 million years ago) and contains exquisitely preserved assemblages of the oldest abundant and diverse, large fossils known anywhere.

      More than 10,000 fossil impressions, ranging from a few centimetres to nearly 2 metres in length, are readily visible for scientific study and supervised viewing along the coastline of Mistaken Point. These fossils illustrate a critical watershed in the early history of life on Earth: the appearance of large, biologically complex organisms, including the first ancestral animals. Most of the fossils are rangeomorphs, an extinct group of fractal organisms positioned near the base of animal evolution. These soft-bodied creatures lived on the deep-sea floor, and were buried and preserved in exceptional detail by influxes of volcanic ash – each layer of ash creating an “Ediacaran Pompeii.” Modern erosion has exhumed more than 100 fossil sea-floor surfaces, ranging from small beds with single fossils to larger surfaces adorned with up to 4,500 megafossils. The animals died where they lived, and their resultant fossil assemblages preserve both the morphology of extinct groups of ancestral animals and the ecological structure of their ancient communities. Radiometric dating of the volcanic ash beds that directly overlie the fossil-bearing surfaces is providing a detailed chronology for 20 million years in the early evolution of complex life.

      Criterion (viii): Mistaken Point fossils constitute an outstanding record of a critical milestone in the history of life on Earth, “when life got big” after almost three billion years of microbe-dominated evolution. The fossils range in age from 580 to 560 million years, the longest continuous record of Ediacara-type megafossils anywhere, and predate by more than 40 million years the Cambrian explosion, being the oldest fossil evidence of ancestors of most modern animal groups. Mistaken Point contains the world’s oldest-known examples of large, architecturally complex organisms, including soft-bodied, ancestral animals. Ecologically, Mistaken Point contains the oldest and most diverse examples of Ediacaran deep-sea communities in the world thus preserving rare insights into the ecology of these ancestral animals and the early colonization of the deep-sea floor. Other attributes contributing to the property’s Outstanding Universal Value include the world’s first examples of metazoan locomotion, exceptional potential for radiometric dating of the assemblages, and evidence for the role of ancient oxygen levels in the regional and global appearance of complex multicellular life.

      Integrity

      The clearly defined property boundary encompasses coastal exposures preserving all the features that convey its Outstanding Universal Value. All of the key fossils and strata are within the property. The width of the property and its buffer zone, which in large part corresponds to the Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, are sufficient to absorb the very gradual, long-term retreat of the coastline due to natural erosion. The natural erosion of the site will refresh the fossil exposures over time.

      The vast majority of Mistaken Point’s fossils – including several type specimens – remain in situ in the field and are thus available for study in their ecological context. Several hundred fossil specimens were collected prior to Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve being established; most of these are currently housed in the Royal Ontario Museum and form the bulk of the type specimens for taxa named and defined from Mistaken Point. Nonetheless the property is thought to contain more specimens of Ediacara-type impression fossils than the sum total of every museum collection on Earth.

      Few traces of past human activities remain and none directly affect the property’s key attributes. Visitation to the site is modest and strictly controlled. The prospect of modern development within or adjacent to the property is minimal and does not impinge upon its coastal outcrops. Incidents of vandalism are very rare and no successful fossil thefts have occurred since the property was designated as an ecological reserve in 1987. No inhabitants reside permanently within the property or its buffer zone.

      Protection and management requirements

      The property is provincially owned and is managed by the Parks and Natural Areas Division of the Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Environment and Conservation. Virtually all of the property, plus most of its buffer zone, lie within Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve which is protected under the Province’s Wilderness and Ecological Reserves Act (1980) and Fossil Ecological Reserve Regulations (2009). With one exception, the remaining portions of the property and buffer zone are protected as Crown Lands Reserves under the provincial Lands Act (1991). Only one small part (0.5 percent) of the buffer zone has been identified as private land; current and anticipated land use is complementary to the rest of the buffer zone.

      The property’s key coastal exposures are further protected by the ecological reserve’s Fossil Protection Zone; access to this zone is by permit only. Undertaking activities such as scientific research at Mistaken Point requires a permit issued by the managing agency. Development is prohibited within the ecological reserve.

      The comprehensive management plan developed for the property and its buffer zone is adaptive and will be revised as required. Input from local residents regarding management issues is channelled through the property’s World Heritage Advisory Council. For management purposes, the property is best treated as a finite fossil site. Except for official salvage of scientifically valuable specimens, collecting fossils is illegal. For conservation reasons, public viewing of the fossils is by guided tour only. Daily patrols of the property are conducted year-round and a volunteer Fossil Guardian Program is in operation.

      The most significant threats to be managed are the ongoing issue of change resulting from natural erosion processes, and impacts of human activity. Under the monitoring plan, vulnerable fossil localities are regularly surveyed and any problems documented. The rate of erosion appears very slow and any loss of fossils to erosion may be offset by new exposures. Monitoring processes should trigger appropriately considered management responses to document fossil evidence, if any significant losses from erosion are identified. The carrying capacity of the property is limited and the cumulative environmental impact of visitation is closely monitored and limited. Limited signs and visitor access to aid presentation of the property are carefully designed and sited to avoid adverse impacts upon the property’s Outstanding Universal Value.

      Through its long-term pledge to provide operational funding and staffing, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is committed to ensure that the highest possible standards of protection and presentation are maintained in the property.

    4. Commends the State Party and all of the stakeholders involved for the development of this nomination including the rigorous and objective comparative analysis which is a model of good practice for fossil sites, and the excellent local engagement in the protection, management and presentation of the property;
    5. Requests the State Party to:
      1. appropriately mark and communicate the boundaries of the property and its buffer zone, including beach landing sites to reinforce protection through enhanced visitor and local awareness,
      2. monitor and mitigate if appropriate potential threats from coastal erosion, especially on the western part of the property, taking great care to evaluate the feasibility and impacts of any interventions prior to implementation,
      3. consider the possible addition of any significant new Ediacaran fossil site discoveries in the region where these would add further attributes to the Outstanding Universal Value of the property.

    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6790 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.13 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List
  • Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B.Add and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2.Add,
  • Recalling Decision 38 COM 8B.11 adopted at its 38th session (Doha, 2014),
  • Having examined the independent technical mission report requested by Decision 38 COM 8B.11 that confirms the scientific value of the site,
  • Considers that, in respect to Outstanding Universal Value, the site has a potential to meet criterion (viii);
  • Refers the nomination of the Tectono-volcanic Ensemble of the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault, France, back to the State Party in order to allow it, with the advice of IUCN and the World Heritage Centre, to resolve some issues related to integrity and management by:
    1. proposing minor boundary modifications in order to exclude from the perimeter until the soon coming definitive closure, the two active pouzzolane quarries,
    2. reinforcing the tools allowing the local stakeholders to better understand the different regulations applying to the nominated property and its buffer zone,
    3. strengthen the implementation of existing regulation on private properties;
  • Expresses its appreciation to the State Party, and the local stakeholders and communities for their on-going commitment towards the protection and management of the landscape and heritage of this region.
  • ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6791 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.14 Examination of nominations of natural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes the Archipiélago de Revillagigedo, Mexico, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (vii), (ix) and (x);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 386 km southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula, and 720 to 970 km west of the Mexican mainland. The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is a serial nomination made up of four remote islands and their surrounding waters: Isla San Benedicto, Isla Socorro, Isla Roca Partida and Isla Clarión. The property covers 636,685 ha and includes a marine protected area extending 12 nautical miles around each of the islands. A very large buffer zone of 14,186,420 ha surrounds all four islands. Ocean depths within the buffer zone of the property reach 3.7 km, particularly to the west of Isla Roca Partida, and to the west and south of Isla Clarión. Due to their volcanic origin, depths around the islands increase abruptly at distances of between 10-12 km from the island shorelines. The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is part of a submarine mountain range with the four islands representing the peaks of volcanoes emerging above sea level. Apart from two small naval bases, the islands are uninhabited.

      The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo represents an exceptional convergence of two marine biogeographic regions: the Northeastern Pacific and Eastern Pacific. More particularly, the property lies along the junction where the California and Equatorial current mix generating a complex and highly productive transition zone. The islands and surrounding waters of the Archipiélago de Revillagigedo are rich in marine life and recognised as important stepping-stones and stop overs for wide ranging species. The property harbours abundant populations of sharks, rays, large pelagic fish, Humpback Whales, turtles and manta rays; a concentration of wildlife that attracts recreational divers from around the world.

      Each of the islands displays characteristic terrestrial flora and fauna and their relative isolation has resulted in high levels of species endemism and micro-endemism, particularly among fish and bird species, many of which are globally threatened. The islands provide critical habitat for a range of terrestrial and marine creatures and are of particular importance to seabirds with Masked, Blue-footed, Red-footed and Brown Boobies, Red-billed Tropicbirds, Magnificent Frigatebirds and many other species dependent on the island and sea habitats. The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is the only place in the world where the critically endangered Townsend’s Shearwater breeds.

      Criterion (vii): Both the landscape and seascape of the Archipiélago de Revillagigedo exhibit impressive active volcanos, arches, cliffs, and isolated rock outcrops emerging from the middle of the ocean. The clear surrounding waters create exceptional scenic vistas with large aggregations of fish gathering around the steep walls and seamounts, as well as large pelagic marine species including Giant Manta Rays, whales, dolphins and sharks. One of the most remarkable aspects of the property is the concentration the Giant Manta Rays which aggregate around the islands and interact with divers in a special way that is rarely found anywhere in the world. Furthermore, the property encompasses an underwater seascape with abyssal plains at depths close to 4,000 meters and sheer drops in crystal clear water, all contributing to an awe-inspiring underwater experience. A large population of up to 2,000 Humpback Whales visits the islands. The songs of these majestic cetaceans can be heard during the winter months and while diving, add another sensory dimension to the marine seascape.

      Criterion (ix): The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is located in the northern part of the Tropical East Pacific Province, a transitional zone influenced mainly by the California current but mixed with the warm waters from the North Equatorial Current. This location results in the convergence of a multitude of fauna and flora, and creates a unique set of biological and ecological processes. The isolation and relatively pristine state of these islands has supported evolutionary processes which result in a high degree of endemicity in both the terrestrial as well as marine realms. In the marine realm the waters surrounding these islands are composed of majestic aggregations of sharks, rays, cetaceans, turtles and fish, a number of which are endemic or near-endemic. On land, important evolutionary processes have led to the speciation of 2 endemic lizards, 2 endemic snakes, 4 endemic birds, at least 33 endemic plant species, and innumerable invertebrates. In addition, 11 endemic subspecies of birds have evolved on the islands, indicating the potential for future evolution on these remote and well protected islands.

      Criterion (x): The geographic isolation of the Archipiélago de Revillagigedo, shaped by the prevailing oceanographic conditions, results in high marine productivity, rich biodiversity and exceptional levels of endemism, both terrestrial and marine. The islands are the only breeding site for the Townsend’s Shearwater, one of the rarest seabirds in the world. The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is also home to the endemic Socorro Dove, Socorro Mockingbird, Socorro Wren, Clarion Wren (as well as 11 endemic bird subspecies), 2 lizards, 2 snakes and numerous endemic plants and invertebrates, all of which contribute to the importance of these islands in conserving terrestrial biodiversity. In the marine realm at least 10 reef fish species have been identified as endemic or near-endemic including the spectacular Clarión Angelfish, which can be observed in ‘cleaning stations’ feeding on the ectoparasites of the Giant Manta Rays. These rays, some of them unusually completely black, aggregate in some of the largest numbers known worldwide. The property is a haven for a rich diversity of shark species with up to 20 having been recorded. Up to 2,000 Humpback Whales also migrate through these nutrient rich and productive waters. The islands are also of significant importance to seabirds notably Masked, Blue-footed, Red-footed and Brown Boobies, Red-billed Tropicbirds, Magnificent Frigatebirds and many other species which can be seen soaring around the rocky outcrops where they nest and fish in the sea.

      Integrity

      The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is remote and largely uninhabited so threats to the property are relatively low. Invasive introduced species represent the greatest threat to the ecology of these islands and their surrounding waters. Major conservation successes by the Mexican Government working with NGOs have seen the eradication of larger invasives such as pigs and sheep from various islands. Ongoing vigilance will be needed to ensure the natural systems of the archipelago are not impacted by damaging invasive species. Enhanced biosecurity measures directed by a biosecurity plan are required to protect the ecosystems of the archipelago from this threat.

      To date, tourism has been restricted by the Mexican Government to a set number of diving boats, and no people are allowed on-shore without a permit. Diving carrying capacities and regulations are set in the management plan, and given the restricted number of potential dive sites and their small area, it is unlikely that diving impacts within the area will increase. Fishing is restricted through the marine area zoning system; however, there are concerns regarding policing and instances of sport fishing. The extension of a no-take fishing zone by 12 nautical miles to align with the property boundaries is considered essential to bolster protection of the island’s marine resources as is the enforcement of strengthened fishing regulations in the property’s large buffer zone.

      In conclusion, the property is of adequate size and includes all elements necessary to express its outstanding values in the terrestrial and marine realms. Integrity of the marine area will be further strengthened if the entire area of the property becomes a no-take zone, and fishing regulations are strengthened in the large proposed buffer zone. For terrestrial values it must be noted that past development, i.e. the introduction of invasive sheep, pigs, cats, rabbits and mice, have considerably damaged some of its values, but rats were never introduced to the islands which is exceptional for subtropical islands of this size. It is to be commended that pigs and sheep have been eradicated and the numbers of cats on Socorro have been severely reduced with the hope that they too will be eradicated.

      Protection and management requirements

      The Archipiélago de Revillagigedo is Mexican federal territory and all parts of the property are hence state owned and controlled. The property is protected under a range of legislation pertinent to different agency jurisdictions with the principle protective legislation being the General Law of Ecological Balance and the Protection of the Environment (LGEEPA). The islands are managed as a natural protected area by the Natural Commission of Natural Protected Areas (CONANP) in close collaboration with a number of other government authorities and various NGO and university partners. Of particular importance is the effective collaboration with the Mexican Navy who provide staffing and infrastructure support to monitor the islands and ensure the enforcement of regulations. This cooperation among agencies is doubly important to augment relatively modest staffing and government financial resources which are applied to the property.

      Improved monitoring is needed to prevent sport fishers entering no fishing zones and to manage their impacts. Efforts are also needed to ensure that fishing in the very large surrounding buffer zone is managed to be sustainable so as to counteract the potential or real threat of over-fishing in the region.

      Management emphasis should be applied to the control and where possible eradication of alien invasive species from the islands and their marine environments. A biosecurity plan should also direct quarantining and response mechanisms to ensure protection from potential introduction threats. This is particularly important to maintain the island’s rat free status which is both unusual in a sub-tropical island system and crucial to maintaining healthy functioning ecosystems and protecting key species.

      Additional research and inventory is needed to better understand the biodiversity values of the property in particular submarine and deep sea ecosystems.

    4. Requests the State Party, in order to further strengthen the integrity and long term management of the property, to:
      1. increase legal protection and revise the management plan in order to extend the no-take zone to 12 nautical miles from the islands, thereby aligning it to the boundary of the property,
      2. strengthen monitoring and targeted management of alien invasive species within the property and introduce and rigorously implement a biosecurity plan to guard against the future spread of introduced species,
      3. ensure careful management of tourism in anticipation of future increases in the activities of recreational divers in order to mitigate adverse impacts on marine environments and important species such as Humpback Whales and Giant Manta Rays,
      4. install, with the support of the diving boat operators, a limited number of permanent mooring buoys in agreed and limited locations, to reduce the impact of anchoring and to prohibit anchoring outside of these locations, and
      5. undertake further research into the property’s biodiversity and ecology particularly in sub-marine and deep sea ecosystems in order to better understand and manage for the protection of the full marine resources of the property;
    5. Commends the State Party for establishing strong inter-agency collaboration to protect the property and encourages strengthened cooperation particularly with the Mexican Navy and the Commission of Fisheries (CONAPESCA) to tighten uses and controls in the buffer zone, to improve capacity to address illegal fishing including sport fishing, to regulate diving activity and to provide effective biosecurity measures for the property.
    6. Requests the State Party to provide to the World Heritage Centre a report on progress regarding the establishment of the extended no-take zone, improved monitoring and regulation of fishing, proposed improvements to overall management capacity, improved biosecurity measures and other matters by 1 December 2018, for review by IUCN.

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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6792 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.15 Examination of nominations of mixed properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B, WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1 and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes the Ennedi Massif: Natural and Cultural Landscape, Chad, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (iii), (vii) and (ix);
    3. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:
      [Text available in French only]
    4. Requests the State Party to present documentation meeting the requirements of the Operational Guidelines, which:
      1. strengthens the legal protection status of the property by the creation as of December 2016 of a protected area with a regime of protection adequate to the values of the property and meeting the protection requirements of the Convention,
      2. establishes a revised management plan that will be ratified as of September 2016 for the whole property meeting the international standards, including an operational implementation calendar for all steps needed to achieve this goal and clarify the management responsibilities of the new system in coordination with the traditional one which has been in place until today, and which clearly:
        1. spells out management operations to conserve the World Heritage values,
        2. includes a zonation which allows full protection of the key areas for biodiversity,
        3. details the measures foreseen to address the main potential threats,
        4. guarantees the full participation of the local communities and of their traditional authorities in the management of the property, and
        5. clarifies the institutional management regime of the property and provides a detailed staffing and budget consistent with the effective implementation of the required management;
      3. includes a strategy to establish a detailed botanical inventory of the site, to identify all important refugia and areas for relict flora that may further justify the application of criterion (ix);
    5. Recommends the State Party to extend the northern boundaries of the property to include all attributes of Outstanding Universal Value including the rock art sites;
    6. Also recommends the State Party to give consideration to the following:
      1. preparing and submitting cartographic documentation and mapping, with the assistance of the research institutions that have been and are currently working in the region, at an adequate scale, of the sites so far inventoried, in order to have a baseline for protection, conservation and management purposes,
      2. strengthening and diversifying waste management according to the waste types in the revised management plan,
      3. continuing training and sensitization of local communities,
      4. establishing capacity building strategies and training programmes in order to prepare the future managers of the property from within the members of the local communities,
      5. incorporating in the revised management plan a Heritage Impact Assessment approach into the management system, so as to ensure that any programme, project or legislation regarding the property be assessed in terms of its consequences on the Outstanding Universal Value and its supporting attributes;
    7. Thanks the State Party for its commitment not to develop oil exploitation programme in areas within the property and the buffer zone;
    8. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre, by 1 December 2017, a report on implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations, for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6793 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.16 Examination of nominations of mixed properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B, WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1 and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes The Ahwar of Southern Iraq: Refuge of Biodiversity and the Relict Landscape of the Mesopotamian Cities, Iraq, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (iii), (v), (ix) and (x);
    3. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The Ahwar of Southern Iraq evolved as part of the wider alluvial plain during the final stage of the alpine tectonic movement, which also lead to the evolvement of the Zagros Mountains. This took place during the late Pliocene to early Pleistocene eras. Several factors intertwined to construct the property including; tectonic movements, climatic changes, river hydrology dynamics, precipitation variation, and changes in sea level. The sea level variation and the climatic changes had a significant role in influencing the quantity and quality of water entering the Ahwar through rivers and their branches, in addition to advancement and regression of the sea and intrusion during dry to semi-dry to wet conditions during the last 18,000 years.

      Between the 5th and 3rd millennium BCE, the level of the Arabian Gulf reached its maximum extent some 200 km inland of the present coastline with marshes stretching further inland. The marshy and moving landscape of this deltaic plain was the heartland where the first cities flourished. Uruk, Ur and Eridu, the three cultural components of the property, were originally situated on the margins of freshwater marshes and developed into some of the most important urban centers of southern Mesopotamia. These cities saw the origin of writing, monumental architecture in the form of mudbrick temples and ziggurats, and complex technologies and societies. A vast corpus of cuneiform texts and archaeological evidence testifies to the centrality of the marshes for the economy, worldview and religious beliefs of successive cultures in southern Mesopotamia.

      Starting in the 2ndmillennium BCE, the sea regressed towards the south. This led to another climatic change towards a more arid environment and the drying up of the ancient marshes. Environmental change contributed to the decline of the great cities of southern Mesopotamia. Today the mudbrick ruins of Uruk, Ur and Eridu are dominated by the remains of ziggurats which still stand high above the arid but striking landscape of the desiccated alluvial plain. With the regression of the Gulf, new marshes formed to the southeast. The main components of the Ahwar as we know them today were formed during this period around 3,000 years ago.

      The Ahwar are generally fed by the branches of the Tigris and Euphrates, in addition to extremely low winter rainfall and subsequent floods. These factors collectively determine the surface area covered by water as well as its fluctuations; the peak taking place in the flooding season associated with rainfall upstream in the basin during winter and then affected by the snowmelt during spring, and reaching the lowest levels during the dry summer period. This fluctuation in water levels and surface areas has resulted in highly dynamic and variable ecological conditions.

      The Huwaizah Marshes component is a unique freshwater system, receiving high water quantities from floods and limited amounts of seasonal rain which descends from the northern and northeastern heights. Concurrently, it is the sole natural component that was not subject to drastic drought during the man-induced drainage phase in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to the salvation of its key ecological elements. This led it to become the primary refuge for many of the key bird species of African and Indian origin in the Middle East, which have since spread back to other components after the reflooding took place in early 2000s.

      By contrast, the Central Marshes component comprises today’s ecological core of the Ahwar. Being distinctive for its horizontally extensive ecosystems, it provides a vast habitat for many of the viable populations of taxa of high biodiversity and conservation importance.

      Moving towards the east and south, the East and West Hammar Marshes components embrace a particular ecological phenomenon in contrast with the other components. Here, the salt water from the sea progresses inland affected on one side by tidal movements in the southern-most regions of marshes, while on the other side, pushing its way into the extended desert to the southeast. This creates very specific ecological conditions with fish species from marine origins utilizing the area for reproduction in the East Hammar, while the West Hammar comprises the last stopover area for millions of migrating birds before entering the vast Arabian Desert.

      Criterion (iii): The remains of the Mesopotamian cities of Uruk, Ur and Eridu offer a complete testimony to the growth and subsequent decline of southern Mesopotamian urban centers and societies from the Ubaid and Sumerian periods until the Babylonian and Hellenistic periods. The three cities were major religious, political, economic and cultural centers which emerged and grew during a period of profound change in human history. These three components of the property bear witness to the full repertoire of the contribution of southern Mesopotamian cultures to the development of ancient Near Eastern urbanized societies and the history of mankind as a whole: the construction of monumental public works and structures in the form of ziggurats, temples, palaces, city walls, and hydraulic works; a class structured society reflected in the urban layout which included royal tombs and palaces, sacred precincts, public storehouses, areas dedicated to industries, and extensive residential neighborhoods; the centralized control of resources and surplus which gave rise to the first writing system and administrative archives; and conspicuous consumption of imported goods. This exceptionally creative period in human history left its marks across place and time.

      Criterion (v): The remains of the ancient cities of Uruk, Ur and Eridu – today in the desert but originally situated near freshwater marshes which receded or became saline before drying up – best exemplify the impact of the unstable deltaic landscape of the Tigris and Euphrates upon the rise and fall of large urban centers. Testimonies of this relict wetland landscape are found today in the cities' topography as traces of shallow depressions which held permanent or seasonal marshes, dry waterways and canal beds, and settlement mounds formed upon what were once islets surrounded by marsh water. Architectural elements, archaeological evidence and an important corpus of cuneiform texts further document how the landscape of wetlands contributed to shaping the religious beliefs, cultic practices, and literary and artistic expressions of successive cultures in southern Mesopotamia. The contemporary Ahwar of southern Iraq bear a strong cultural significance as they offer the closest living representation of the environmental context which fostered the development of the first cities and complex societies in the region, and fashioned the worldview of Mesopotamian cultures. The association of the contemporary Ahwar with some of the most prominent and best documented ancient urban centers of southern Iraq allows for understanding the unique ancient cultural landscape of alluvial Mesopotamia where cities were islands embedded in a marshy plain.

      Criterion (ix): The site contains outstanding examples representing ongoing ecological and biological processes in the evolution and development of terrestrial, fresh and salt water ecosystems and communities of various taxa.

      The Ahwar of southern Iraq may be one the largest-scale wetland ecosystem that is located in the most arid environment globally. The grand mosaic of the four components of the property is an exceptional example of ongoing ecological processes which reflect this extreme and harsh environment, particularly regarding  almost complete dependence on riverine influx and negligible direct contribution of precipitation on-site to the water budget, very high water temperatures around or in excess of 30°C in summer with no thermal stratification of the water column, high irradiation  which   leads to very high primary production, high dissolved oxygen concentrations throughout the water column and high overall ecosystem productivity.

      The bird migration and the migration of fish and shrimp species which occur within the property’s habitats reflect an adaptation process by these animals to long-term seasonal fluctuations in water levels and other ecological variables.

      The Ahwar have developed an amazing ecological resilience, remarkable adaptive capacity against fluctuations and environmental change, in addition to the velocity of recovery processes.  The Ahwar of Iraq are set apart by the fact that the last dramatic recovery process took place very recently, right after the drastic destruction of the Ahwar during the second half of the last century and the re-flooding of the Ahwar at the beginning of the new millennium.

      Criterion (x): The proposed site contains highly important and significant habitats for in-situ conservation of biological diversity, including those containing threatened species of high conservation and scientific importance. The Ahwar of southern Iraq are one of the world’s most important freshwater ecosystems situated within an extremely arid environment with some of the highest evaporation and transpiration levels, and some of the lowest levels of rainfall. They can be considered a "wetland island in a vast ocean of desert". The Ahwar embrace a mosaic of habitats critical for a significant number of taxa, including globally threatened and range-restricted species and isolated populations, thus creating a site of global caliber in terms of species of conservation priority.

      The Ahwar host 12 globally threatened bird species, such as the vulnerable Marbled Teal.   Another vulnerable species, the Basra Reed-Warbler, which is a restricted-range species, has more than 70% of its breeding population in the Marshes. The Ahwar also include critical natural habitats for three threatened mammal species, including the Smooth-coated Otter and the Bunn’s Bandicot Rat. The Euphrates Soft-shell Turtle is an endangered species that is only known from a few localities in Iraq and Iran, whereas Murray’s Comb-fingered Gecko has a restricted range limited to the Ahwar, Shatt Al Arab and the Iranian western shores on the Arabian Gulf.

      Integrity

      The three archaeological ensembles included in the property offer a comprehensive picture of the Ubaid and Sumerian urbanization process within their original marshlands environment. All the major archaeological and architectural features of Eridu, Uruk, and Ur are contained within the boundaries of the property ensuring that each component part bears a complete significance and contributes to expressing the Outstanding Universal Value of the property as a whole.

      The use of mud as the main building material in southern Mesopotamia creates specific conservation conditions. The toll which the passing of time took on the abandoned southern Mesopotamian cities is heavier than in the case of stone or fired brick architecture found in other regions of the ancient world where remains can be monumental and visually impressive. Yet the remains of the four ziggurats of Eridu, Uruk and Ur, however eroded, still tower over the desert landscape and provide a striking visual testimony of the antiquity and durability of the most emblematic architectural features of Mesopotamian cities.

      Layers of sedimentation protected the remains of Uruk, Ur and Eridu until the 20th century when archaeological excavations exposed several buildings anew. Eridu’s excavated remains were later reburied except for the ziggurat. In Uruk and Ur there were some instances of incompatible material used to consolidate or protect the remains, whereas others were left exposed with the result that some have become affected by erosion caused mainly by rain and dust storms.   Furthermore, large areas of the three cities are still unearthed, leaving room for further study of archaeological and conservation techniques respectful of the property’s integrity.

      Uruk, Ur and Eridu are protected under the Iraqi Law of Antiquities and Heritage and are provided with personnel to ensure the protection and monitoring of the antiquities. Lastly, only Ur has suffered limited and reversible damages during the recent conflict and remedial measures are introduced under the new management plan.

      The four natural components of the property and their associated corridors comprise a vast region of over 210,000 ha, thus being of sufficient size to adequately support all key natural values including the ongoing ecological and biological processes occurring in the terrestrial, water and marshland ecosystems. The large size of the associated buffer zones around each of the four components, totaling more than 200,000 additional hectares, further serves the long term protection of the property on a whole as well as at the component level.

      The four components embrace the vast majority of the breeding grounds of key bird species within different regions of the property. The breeding grounds are areas of low human intervention where reed vegetation is used to build nests on the banks of the small islets abundant in the area which are surrounded with extensive water bodies located in isolation from the dry lands and away from potential predators.

      Numerous populations of more than 197 species of migrating water birds associated with the Palearctic region settle on the property and spend winter periods here during their west Eurasia-Caspian-Nile and Eurasian-Africa route migrations. The numbers of landing migrating birds is increasing on the property, paralleling the improving levels of rehabilitation. Further, increasing records of the occurrence of globally threatened species are being documented, hence reflecting positively on the property’s ecological integrity. 

      The existing legal frameworks in relationship to the Ahwar are well developed with the national nature conservation bylaw endorsement by the government cabinet in late 2013. 

      Authenticity

      Considering the particulars of mud architecture, the conditions of authenticity as regards the material and substance are considered to be met by the visible presence of a series of emblematic public buildings in the three cultural components of the property. Previous excavations at Ur and Eridu have concentrated on monumental public buildings and allowed for a good understanding of the spatial organization of the political, administrative and religious sections of the cities. In Ur, the main harbor, situated outside the boundaries of the property, has yet to be excavated and the boundaries of the property might be extended at a later stage to include it. No major restoration or conservation projects have been carried out with the exception of the 1960s rebuilding of part of the outer shell of the Ur ziggurat using baked brick and limited amounts of cement. These interventions did not affect the original structure and shape of the monument. More recent conservation of the site has been done using compatible material as much as possible.

      Changes in the water regime have modified the hydrological and ecological environment of southern Iraq as the marshes moved southeastward through space and time. The remains of Uruk, Ur and Eridu are today surrounded by a desert landscape and are at a significant distance from the marsh components of the property and the sea. Taking this ecological reality into consideration, the conditions of authenticity are considered to be met by including in the property the ancient cities of Ur, Uruk and Eridu.

    4. Congratulates the State Party for the restoration work that has been undertaken to recover the wetland areas in the Ahwar of Southern Iraq to date, and strongly encourages this work to continue in order to permanently secure the minimum flows needed to the property and its buffer zones;
    5. Requests the State Party, with support of IUCN, ICOMOS and the World Heritage Centre to:
      1. in relation to natural heritage:
        1. conduct further studies regarding minimum water flows needed to sustain the biodiversity and ecological processes for the inscribed property,
        2. conduct further studies to confirm the plant, vertebrate and invertebrate diversity within the property and its surrounding landscapes,
        3. complete the designation of all of the components of the property as legally protected areas, and ensure effective legal protection to regulate oil and gas concessions, and other potentially impacting activities in the buffer zones of the property,
        4. provide support for the maintenance of the traditional ecological knowledge held by the men and women of the Ma’adan “Marsh Arabs” communities, and for rights-based approaches to management, recognising the customary use of the property;
      2. in relation to cultural heritage:
        1. in order to address the highly unstable conservation conditions of the archaeological sites, undertake a programme of surveys to create a base-line delineation of the state of conservation of the property,
        2. develop conservation programmes for all three cities on the basis of the surveys that clearly set out the various options for intervention,
        3. produce a detailed master plan/road map that ensures the conservation of the property on a sustainable basis;
      3. ensure effective implementation of the consolidated management plan and publicize it in both English and Arabic, setting out the governance systems and how it relates to management plans for individual component sites and ensuring its effective consultation and communication with local communities and other stakeholders,
      4. put in place a programme to ensure an adequate level of protection and effective site-level management capacity for all component parts of the property, and appropriate capacity building activities;
    6. Further requests the State Party to submit an edited version of the nomination text and of the map showing the boundaries according to the statement jointly signed with the State Party of the Islamic Republic of Iran;
    7. Requests furthermore the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6794 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.17 Examination of nominations of mixed properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B, WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1 and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Inscribes the Khangchendzonga National Park, India, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (iii), (vi), (vii) and (x);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Situated in the northern Indian State of Sikkim, Khangchendzonga National Park (KNP) exhibits one of the widest altitudinal ranges of any protected area worldwide. The Park has an extraordinary vertical sweep of over 7 kilometres (1,220m to 8,586m) within an area of only 178,400 ha and comprises a unique diversity of lowlands, steep-sided valleys and spectacular snow-clad mountains including the world’s third highest peak, Mt. Khangchendzonga. Numerous lakes and glaciers, including the 26 km long Zemu Glacier, dot the barren high altitudes.

      The property falls within the Himalaya global biodiversity hotspot and displays an unsurpassed range of sub-tropical to alpine ecosystems. The Himalayas are narrowest here resulting in extremely steep terrain which magnifies the distinction between the various eco-zones which characterise the property. The Park is located within a mountain range of global biodiversity conservation significance and covers 25% of the State of Sikkim, acknowledged as one of India’s most significant biodiversity concentrations. The property is home to a significant number of endemic, rare and threatened plant and animal species. The property has one of the highest number of plant and mammal species recorded in the Central/High Asian Mountains, and also has a high number of bird species.

      Khangchendzonga National Park’s grandeur is undeniable and the Khangchendzonga Massif, other peaks and landscape features are revered across several cultures and religions. The combination of extremely high and rugged mountains covered by intact old-growth forests up to the unusually high timberline further adds to the exceptional landscape beauty.

      Mount Khangchendzonga and many natural features within the property and its wider setting are endowed with deep cultural meanings and sacred significance, giving form to the multi-layered landscape of Khangchendzonga, which is sacred as a hidden land both to Buddhists (Beyul) and to Lepchas as Mayel Lyang, representing a unique example of co-existence and exchange between different religious traditions and ethnicities, constituting the base for Sikkimese identity and unity. The ensemble of myths, stories and notable events, as well as the sacred texts themselves, convey and make manifest the cultural meanings projected onto natural resources and the indigenous and specific Buddhist cosmogony that developed in the Himalayan region. 

      The indigenous traditional knowledge of the properties of local plants and the local ecosystem, which is peculiar to local peoples, is on the verge of disappearing and represents a precious source of information on the healing properties of several endemic plants. The traditional and ritual management system of forests and the natural resources of the land pertaining to Buddhist monasteries express the active dimension of Buddhist cosmogonies and could contribute to the property's effective management.

      Criterion (iii): The property – with Mount Khangchendzonga and other sacred mountains – represents the core sacred region of the Sikkimese and syncretistic religious and cultural traditions and thus bears unique witness to the coexistence of multiple layers of both Buddhist and pre-Buddhist sacred meanings in the same region, with the abode of mountain deity on Mt Khangchendzonga. The property is central to the Buddhist understanding of Sikkim as a beyul, that is, an intact site of religious ritual and cultural practice for Tibetan Buddhists in Sikkim, in neighbouring countries and all over the world. The sacred Buddhist importance of the place begins in the 8th century with Guru Rinpoche’s initiation of the Buddhist sanctity of the region, and later appears in Buddhist scriptures such as the prophetical text known as the Lama Gongdu, revealed by Terton Sangay Lingpa (1340-1396), followed by the opening of the beyul in the 17th century, chiefly by Lhatsun Namkha Jigme.

      Criterion (vi): Khangchedzonga National Park is the heartland of a multi-ethnic culture which has evolved over time, giving rise to a multi-layered syncretic religious tradition, which centres on the natural environment and its notable features. This kinship is expressed by the region surrounding Mount Khangchendzonga being revered as Mayel Lyang by the indigenous peoples of Sikkim and as a beyul (sacred hidden land) in Tibetan Buddhism. It is a specific Sikkimese form of sacred mountain cult which is sustained by regularly-performed rituals, both by Lepcha people and Bhutias, the latter performing two rituals: the Nay-Sol and the Pang Lhabsol. The kinship between the human communities and the mountainous environment has nurtured the elaboration of a profound traditional knowledge of the natural resources and of their properties, particularly within the Lepcha community. Mount Khangchendzonga is the central element of the socio-religious order, of the unity and solidarity of the ethnically very diverse Sikkimese communities.

      Criterion (vii): The scale and grandeur of the Khangchendzonga Massif and the numerous other peaks within Khangchendzonga National Park are extraordinary and contribute to a landscape that is revered across several cultures and religions. The third highest peak on the planet, Mt. Khangchendzonga (8,586 m asl) straddles the western boundary of Khangchendzonga National Park and is one of 20 picturesque peaks measuring over 6,000 m located within the park. The combination of extremely high and rugged mountains covered by intact old-growth forests up to the unusually high timberline and the pronounced altitudinal vegetation zones further adds to the exceptional landscape beauty. These peaks have attracted people from all over the world, mountaineers, photographers and those seeking spiritual fulfilment. The park boasts eighteen glaciers including Zemu Glacier, one of the largest in Asia, occupying an area of around 10,700 ha. Similarly, there are 73 glacial lakes in the property including over eighteen crystal clear and placid high altitude lakes.

      Criterion (x): Khangchendzonga National Park is located within a mountain range of global biodiversity conservation significance and covers 25% of the State of Sikkim, acknowledged as one of the most significant biodiversity concentrations in India. The property has one of the highest levels of plant and mammal diversity recorded within the Central/High Asian Mountains. Khangchendzonga National Park is home to nearly half of India’s bird diversity, wild trees, orchids and rhododendrons and one third of the country's flowering plants. It contains the widest and most extensive zone of krummholz (stunted forest) in the Himalayan region. It also provides a critical refuge for a range of endemic, rare and threatened species of plants and animals. The national park exhibits an extraordinary altitudinal range of more than 7 kilometres in a relatively small area giving rise to an exceptional range of eastern Himalaya landscapes and associated wildlife habitat. This ecosystem mosaic provides a critical refuge for an impressive range of large mammals, including several apex predators. A remarkable six cat species have been confirmed (Leopard, Clouded Leopard, Snow Leopard, Jungle Cat, Golden Cat, Leopard Cat) within the park. Flagship species include Snow Leopard as the largest Himalayan predator, Jackal, Tibetan Wolf, large Indian Civet, Red Panda, Goral, Blue Sheep, Himalayan Tahr, Mainland Serow, two species of Musk Deer, two primates, four species of pika and several rodent species, including the parti-coloured Flying Squirrel.

      Integrity

      Khangchendzonga National Park has an adequate size to sustain the complete representation of its Outstanding Universal Value. The Park was established in 1977 and later expanded in 1997 to include the major mountains and the glaciers and additional lowland forests. The more than doubling in size also accommodated the larger ranges of seasonally migrating animals. The property comprises some 178,400 ha with a buffer zone of some 114,712 ha included within the larger Khangchendzonga Biosphere Reserve which overlays the property. The property encompasses a unique mountain system comprising of peaks, glaciers, lakes, rivers and an entire range of ecologically-linked biological elements, which ensures the sustainability of unique mountain ecosystem functions.

      The key human-made features that shape the sacred geography embedded in the Sikkimese belief systems, are included in the property. Dzonga, Sikkim's guardian deity and the owner and protector of the land, resides on Mount Khangchendzonga and, on its slopes, Mayel Lyang, the Lepcha's mythological place, is located. On the other hand, the Buddhist concept of beyul, or hidden sacred land, extends well beyond the boundaries of the property, endowing the whole of Sikkim with a sacred meaning.

      Therefore, other human-made attributes that are functionally important as a support to the cultural significance of the property, its protection and its understanding, are located in the buffer zone, in the Khangchendzonga Biosphere Reserve, and in the wider setting of the property.

      The representativeness of lower altitude ecosystems within the property could be improved by considering progressive additions of what are well protected and valuable forests in the current buffer zone. The functional integrity of this system would also profit from opportunities to engage with neighbouring countries such as Nepal, China and Bhutan which share the wider ecosystem: the most obvious collaboration being with the Kanchenjunga Conservation Area in Nepal as this protected area is contiguous with Khangchendzonga National Park and Mt Khangchendzonga effectively straddles the border between the two countries.

      The integrity of the associative values and of traditional knowledge has been impacted by past policies for environmental protection, changes in lifestyle and discouragement of traditional practices for subsistence.

      Authenticity

      The authenticity of the cultural attributes within the boundary of the property has been preserved. Although the tangible human-made attributes within the property are restricted to some chortens, gompas and several sacred shrines associated with revered natural features, their continued reverence, maintenance and the associated rituals attest that they bear credible witness to the property's Outstanding Universal Value. Sources of information on the associative values of the property and its attributes comprise the Nay-Sol and the Nay-Yik texts, which provide important information on the stories, the rituals and the associated natural features as well as the still-performed rituals, the oral history and the traditional knowledge held by the Lepcha.

      Protection and management requirements

      The protected area status of Khangchendzonga National Park under the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 of India ensures strong legal protection of all fauna and flora as well as mountains, glaciers, water bodies and landscapes which contribute to the habitat of wildlife. This also assures the protection and conservation of the exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic value of the natural elements within the Park. The property comprises state-owned land and has been protected as a National Park since 1977, whilst the buffer zone is protected as a Forest Reserve.

      Natural features having cultural significance are protected by notifications, n.59/Home/98 and n. 70/Home/2001, issued by the Government of Sikkim. They identify the sacred features and regulate their use as places of worship. Some of the monuments fall under the protection of the Archaeological Survey of India, while other ones are managed by monastic and local communities through traditional management systems that extend to the immediate and wider settings of the monasteries (gya-ra and gya-nak zones).

      The property is managed by the Sikkim Forest, Environment and Wildlife Management Department under the guidance of a management plan with a vision to conserve key ecosystem and landscape attributes whilst promoting recreational opportunities, cultural and educational values as well as the advancement of scientific knowledge and strategies which advance the well-being of local communities. Opportunities should be taken to better empower local people and other stakeholders into decision making related to the property’s management. A partnership is envisaged with the Ecclesiastical Department of Sikkim, the Department of Cultural Heritage Affairs and the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology, to ensure that consideration of cultural values and attributes are integrated into the existing management.

      Efforts should continue to expand knowledge of the property’s biological and ecological values as data is still inadequate. Inventory, research and monitoring should focus on clarifying the species composition within the property and informing policy and management. Periodic evaluation of the effectiveness of management should continue and be used to direct investment into priority areas so that financial and staff resources are matched to the challenges of future management.

      Khangchendzonga National Park displays a rich intertwined range of natural and cultural values which warrant a more integrated approach to the management of natural and cultural heritage. Legal protection, policy and management should be progressively reformed and improved to ensure an appropriate balance between the natural, cultural and spiritual aspects of the property.

      A participatory approach to management exists through the Eco-Development Committees (EDC’s): their role in monitoring and inspection is planned to also be extended to cultural aspects and attributes. From a cultural perspective, the extension of the traditional and participatory management to cultural attributes located in the buffer and transitional zones would greatly assist the effective protection of the cultural values, and the reinforcement of cultural ties and traditional knowledge of the local communities with their environment.

      There are no significant current threats for the property, however, vigilance will be required to monitor and respond to the potential for impact from increasing tourism as a result of publicity and promotion. Similar attention must be paid to the potential impact of climate change on the altitudinal gradients within the property and the sensitive ecological niches which provide critical habitat. Active management of the buffer zone will be essential to prevent unsympathetic developments and inappropriate landuses from surrounding local communities whilst at the same time supporting traditional livelihoods and the equitable sharing of benefits from the park and its buffer zone.

    4. Commends the State Party for undertaking a comprehensive evaluation of management effectiveness and encourages it to address the 12 recommended actionable points in an integrated and adaptive manner in keeping with the cultural values of the property;
    5. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. finalize and implement the envisaged management system and related mechanisms, and extend it to the transitional zone in order to allow the full understanding of the cultural significance of the property and of associated cultural sites,
      2. prepare an implementation calendar for the finalisation of the management system and for the actions envisaged in the additional information submitted in November 2015,
      3. develop inventories of natural and human-made features that are mentioned in sacred texts, for conservation and monitoring purposes, paying careful attention to the landscape value of religious structures when planning maintenance or restoration activities,
      4. put in place protection and regulatory measures for the built heritage and the built-up areas in the transitional zones to assist in retaining their heritage features and improving their landscape characteristics; extend the monitoring system to the cultural dimensions of natural and human-made attributes and set up qualitative and quantitative indicators;
    6. Requests the State Party to submit a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations, along with an implementation calendar for the envisaged actions, by 1 December 2016, for review by the World Heritage Centre and the Advisory Bodies;
    7. Encourages the State Party to consider the progressive addition of suitable lower altitude areas to the inscribed property in order to improve the balance of ecosystems and habitats across the property’s more than 7 kilometre vertical gradient;
    8. Also encourages the States Parties of India and Nepal to foster greater collaboration between Khangchendzonga National Park (India) and Kanchenjunga Conservation Area (Nepal), noting that Mt Khangchendzonga effectively straddles the border between the two countries, and also noting the similarities between the ecosystems of the two protected areas and thus the potential for a future transboundary World Heritage extension of Khangchendzonga National Park.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6795 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.18 Examination of nominations of mixed properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B, WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1 and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B2,
    2. Expresses its appreciation for the combined efforts of the State Party, First Nations, and all authorities and stakeholders involved in the nomination, and for the joint dialogue undertaken with IUCN and ICOMOS, in deepening the understanding of nature-culture connections in the context of the World Heritage Convention
    3. Commends the State Party for presenting a revised nomination which is a landmark for properties nominated through the commitment of Indigenous peoples and which demonstrates how the indissoluble bonds that can exist between culture and nature might be recognized on the World Heritage List;
    4. Also commends the members of the Pimachiowin Aki Corporation for adopting significant measures to ensure the conservation and protection of the property;
    5. Notes that the evaluations by both Advisory Bodies conclude that the nominated property meets the conditions of integrity and authenticity, has adequate protection and management, and justifies Outstanding Universal Value on the basis of criteria (iii), (vi) and (ix);
    6. Recognizing recently identified issues regarding governance and relationships within the Pimachiowin Aki Corporation, refers‎ Pimachiowin Aki, Canada, back to the State Party to allow it to work with the Pimachiowin Aki Corporation to identify and implement appropriate actions to ensure effective governance and management of the nominated property;
    7. Notes that the Advisory Bodies would be ready and willing to offer advice on the above, if requested;
    8. Recommends the State Party to give consideration to ‎continue the development of the management plan to address socio-economic challenges and to promote sustainable livelihoods, including through the development of sustainable tourism and other activities, and giving particular attention to the landscape and its spiritual associations‎.
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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6796 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.19 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes Zuojiang Huashan Rock Art Cultural Landscape, China, on the World Heritage List as a cultural landscape on the basis of criteria (iii) and (vi);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Dating from around the 5th century BCE to the 2nd century CE, 38 sites of rock art and their associated karst, riverine and tableland landscape depict ceremonies that have been interpreted as portraying the bronze drum culture once prevalent across southern China. Located on steep cliffs cut through the karst landscape by the meandering Zuojiang River and its tributary Mingjiang River, the pictographs were created by the Luoyue people illustrating their life and rituals.

      Criterion (iii): The Zuojiang Huashan Rock Art Cultural Landscape, with its special combination of landscape and rock art, vividly conveys the vigorous spiritual and social life of the Luoyue people who lived along the Zuojiang River from the 5th century BCE to the 2nd century CE. It is now the only witness to the tradition.

      Criterion (vi): The images of Zuojiang Huashan depicting drums and related elements are symbolic records directly associated with the bronze drum culture once widespread in the region. Today bronze drums are still respected as symbols of power in southern China. 

      Integrity

      The components of Zuojiang Huashan are relatively complete geographical spatial units, preserving the cliffs bearing the rock art, rivers forest and tablelands. The 38 rock art sites were selected as the best preserved pictographs representing all phases of development. The property contains all the elements necessary to convey the value of the cultural landscape and rock art and does not suffer from development or neglect.

      Authenticity

      Each site enclosed by mountains and rivers has preserved the rock art in its folds for over 2000 years. The location and setting of the rock art is authentic. The rock art is generally located high up on the cliffs, revered by the local inhabitants and although subject to weathering over time is authentic in terms of materials and substance. The motifs and figures of the rock art were related to the beliefs of the inhabitants of the area surrounding them. Today the painted mountains are revered by local people and rituals and sacrifices are performed to appease the invisible forces affecting their lives.

      Protection and management requirements

      One of the 38 rock art sites (Ningming Huashan) is protected at the National level in accordance with the National Law on the Protection of Cultural Relics. The other 37 are all protected at the Provincial level. The remainder of the property is protected by the provisions of Measures of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region on the Protection of Zuojiang Rock Art and the Measures of Chongzuo City on the Protection of Zuojiang Rock Art, together with other laws and regulations which protect the scenic areas, waterways and farmlands, as well as customary village regulations for the protection of rock art in their vicinity. The buffer zones are protected by the regulations of the Construction Control Zone pursuant to the National Law on the Protection of Cultural Relics. Soon all 38 rock art sites will be placed under National level protection.

      Overall management of the property is the responsibility of the Chongzuo Management Centre in Chongzuo City, which oversees the management measures and systems of the subordinate district and county administrative departments under which the three property components fall.

      The Master Plan for the Conservation and Management of Zuojiang Huashan Rock Art Cultural Landscape was approved and issued in January 2015 for implementation by the Chongzuo City People’s Government after consultation with expert committees and public participation. It prohibits all quarrying, sand mining, soil collecting, logging and road construction and controls all development within the property and buffer zone including in the villages, where it restricts the height of construction to 8 metres and area coverage to 150 square metres. It also controls the form, materials and colours of any new construction.

    4. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. completing the plan underway to put all 38 rock art sites under the highest protection level,
      2. preparing a conservation / consolidation programme for all the rock art sites with consequent follow-up monitoring systems,
      3. extending the management plan to include a risk preparedness strategy and addressing the risk of forest fire,
      4. restricting firewood collection from the forest as a means of protecting the environment of the rock art sites,
      5. considering solar heating and electric power instead of fossil fuel for the operation of boats and other facilities in the surrounding villages,
      6. restricting areas for farming to the present level;
    5. Encourages the State Party to ensure that other rock art sites not included in the World Heritage property are not subject to neglect;
    6. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.

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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6797 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.20 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes the Archaeological Site of Nalanda Mahavihara (Nalanda University) at Nalanda, Bihar, India on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (iv) and (vi);
    3. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:
      Brief synthesis

      The Archaeological Site of Nalanda Mahavihara (Nalanda University) is located in the North-eastern state of Bihar, India. Spread over an area of 23 hectares the Archaeological site of Nalanda Mahavihara presents remains dating from circa. 3rd Cen BCE with the largest, one of the earliest and longest serving monastic cum scholastic establishment from 5th Cen CE – 13th Cen CE before the sack and abandonment of Nalanda in the 13th Century. It includes stupas, chaityas, viharas, shrines, many votive structures and shrines and important art works in stucco, stone and metal. The layout of the buildings testifies to the change from grouping around the stupa-chaitya to a formal linear alignment flanking an axis from south to north. The historic development of the property testifies to the development of Buddhism into a religion and the flourishing of monastic and educational traditions.

      Criterion (iv): The property is inscribed under criterion iv on account of its exceptional building typologies, be it a vihara or a stupa, and its planning and layout. Considering the length of time that the mahavihara (university) was functional, and was the largest of its time, it firmly established planning and architectural, as well as artistic principles that were adopted later by many similar institutions in the Indian Subcontinent and South and Southeast Asia. Its built ensemble shows processes of assimilation and developments of prototypes of planning, architecture and art that influenced large parts of Asia.

      Defining standards for contemporary mahaviharas, Nalanda distinguished itself as the one of the earliest planned universities of the Indian subcontinent, and indeed the world. Nalanda’s built remains exemplify its extraordinary contribution to institution-building, pedagogy, architecture, art and pan-Asian culture. Nalanda’s remains mark the advent of systematic planning for a pedagogic establishment. Application of the order enabled its seamless expansion and imparted Nalanda with a distinct visual identity.

      Standardisation of architecture of viharas and evolution of temple-like chaitya (sacred structure) into prototypes here are evidences of sustained interchange and patronage towards expansion of physical infrastructure. The quadrangular free-standing vihara of Gandhara period evolved into a complete residential cum-educational infrastructure borrowed by monastic-cities of South Asia such as Paharpur, Vilkramshila, Odantapuri and Jagaddala.

      Nalanda shows emergence and mainstreaming of a chaitya having quincuxial (five-fold) form. As a reflection and representation of changing religious practices, this new form replaced the traditionally dominant stupa and influenced Buddhist temples in East, South and Southeast Asia.

      Stucco, stone and metal art shows thematic and iconographic assimilation of features from major art-centres of India that expanded the Mahayana pantheon and finalized iconography of Vajrayana pantheon. Nalanda stucco influenced those of Thailand and its metal art influenced art and social life of Malayan archipelago, Nepal, Burma and Tibet.

      Criterion (vi):  Nalanda Mahavihara (university), as a centre for higher learning marks the zenith in the evolution of sangharama (monastic establishment) into the earliest university of early medieval India. Its merit-based approach embraced all contemporary sources of knowledge and systems of learning practiced in the Indian subcontinent. The proposed property demonstrates amply the characteristics of a university through attributes such as intake of students through an entrance examination, formal repositories of manuscripts (libraries), imparting of degrees (Acharya, Pandita, etc.) and a formal administrative setup.

      The sustained scholarship in Nalanda’s viharas crystallised the fundamentals of Indian systems of Logic and Philosophy, principles of Yogachara and Madhyamika Schools and debate as a tool for learning. While Logic and Philosophy are integral part of Indian culture, the principles of Yogachara and Madhyamika enabled transition from Mahayana to Vajrayana. Dispersed through its scholars, the principles influenced large parts of South and Southeast Asia which survives till date in the form of several sects and social customs.

      Nalanda remains one of the earliest and longest serving extraordinary institution-builder. Its systems of pedagogy, administration, planning and architecture were the basis on which later Mahaviharas were established. Nalanda Mahavihara (University) manifests itself in developing and proliferating intangible attributes such as modes of imparting education. Spaces such as courtyards flanked by monks’ cells, presence of a central platform in most viharas, social spaces within viharas developed mode of imparting education through debates as well as Guru-Shishya parampara (teacher-disciple tradition). The continuity of its systems are still evident in the monasteries of South and Southeast Asia. Nalanda continues to inspire modern university establishments in the region like Nava Nalanda Mahavihara, Nalanda University and several others across Asia.

      Integrity

      Archaeological remains of Nalanda Mahavihara (University) were systematically unearthed and preserved simultaneously. These are the most significant parts of the property that demonstrate development in planning, architecture and artistic tradition of Nalanda. As evinced by the surviving antiquities, the site is explicit of a scholar’s life recorded in the “University”.

      While the original mahavihara was a much larger complex, all surviving remains of Nalanda present in the property area of 23 hectares comprising 11 viharas and 14 temples, besides many smaller shrine and votive structures, demonstrate amply its attributes such as axial planning and layout along north - south axis, its architectural manifestation and extant building materials and applied ornamental embellishments. Preserved in-situ are the structural remains of viharas (residential-cum-scholastic structure) and chaityas (temple-like structure) whose layers of construction show evolution of the respective forms. The positioning of these structures over the extent of the site shows the planned layout unique to Nalanda. The property also retains a corpus of moveable and immoveable artefacts and artistic embellishment that shows iconographic development reflecting changes in Buddhist belief system.

      Archaeological remains including the entire protected area of the proposed property are maintained by the Archaeological Survey of India. Buffer zone of the proposed property is sparsely populated with agricultural land and seasonal water bodies and thus poses no threat to property. The Property and the Buffer Zone are protected by a national-level law - Ancient Monument and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act (AMASR), 1958 and (Amendment and Validation, 2010) and is monitored by the National Monument Authority (National level) and office of the District Commissioner, State Government of Bihar (local level).

      Authenticity

      In subsurface condition for over seven centuries the archaeological remains of Nalanda Mahavihara (University) were systematically excavated in the early 20th Cen. CE and conserved in-situ by the Archaeological Survey of India. Methodology adopted by the Archaeological Survey of India for the conservation and consolidation of its viharas and temples ensure the preservation of its historic fabric through adequate capping by the reversible and sacrificial layers and providing supports wherever necessary. Later interventions within the brick fabric are discernible by way of inscription of dates on select bricks at inconspicuous locations. All conservation works and interventions are documented through photographs and drawings and published in the annual reports of ASI.

      Nalanda’s layers of construction, iconography and records testify these remains to be its oldest surviving parts. The spatial organization evident in these excavated remains demonstrate its systematic planning. Temple-like form of chaityas and quadrangular-form of viharas replete with infrastructure authenticate Nalanda’s contribution in developing sacred architecture of the Buddhists and residential-cum-scholastic facilities. Its stucco, stone and metal art retain iconographic features that enabled changes in Buddhist belief system and transition of Mahayana to Vajrayana. The conserved remains also retain the original systems, non-perishable and fragments of perishable materials of construction.

      Nalanda’s contributions to pedagogy survive as socio-cultural practices. Zen and Pure land Buddhism in Japan, Chan and its sub-sects, Wei-shi-siang-kiau, Fa-siangtsung and Avatamsaka in China and Bkah-gdams-pa and its sub-sects Karma-pa and Hbrug-pa, Sa-skya-pa, tradition of spiritual succession in Tibet trace its roots to Madhyamika and Yogachara developed at Nalanda.

      Ceasing functionally as a university (13th century CE), Nalanda’s role as an institution-builder is testified by the borrowing of its system of administration by later Mahaviharas of the 8th century CE. Nalanda’s system of pedagogy is best preserved in Tibetan monasteries where discourses are conducted through debate and dialectics. Furthermore, universities across Asia consider Nalanda the landmark of academic excellence.

      Protection and management requirements

      The Property is owned, protected, maintained and managed by Archaeological Survey of India vide national level laws - the Ancient Monuments and Sites Remains Act of 1958 (Amendment and Validation, 2010) Decisions pertaining to its conservation and management are governed by National Conservation Policy for Monuments, Archaeological Sites and Remains promulgated by the Archaeological Survey of India.

      Conservation and management of property is ordained by a perspective plan and an annual conservation programme. An in-house Committee of the Archaeological Survey of India monitors its state of conservation and conducts need-analysis. This apart, a plan for visitor management and risk preparedness is under preparation.

      The Buffer Zone is also managed by the National Monument Authority vide Ancient Monument and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act (AMASR), 1958, (Amendment and Validation, 2010) in consultation with National Monument Authority (NMA), New Delhi and the State Government of Bihar. Development proposals in this area are vetted by the Competent Authority, Archaeological Survey of India, State Government of Bihar and Nalanda’s District Collectorate’s Office. Buffer Zone also has facilities to augment visitor’s experience.

    4. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. continue to carry out historical research, supported by appropriate documentation, to establish the authenticity of the property with particular attention to the identification of all excavation works carried out before the Archaeological Survey of India, as well as excavations by any other parties of the property, and the identification of all repair works carried out throughout the site, with particular attention to the repairs of brickwork and the documentation of the differentiation of authentic archaeological fabric and added repairs and added capping and sacrificial layers,
      2. ensure that the Integrated Master Plan of Nalanda, keeping in mind national and regional laws, is prepared and implemented by the State Government of Bihar that takes care of the concerns of any development in the vicinity of the property that may impact its Outstanding Universal Value,
      3. conduct a Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) in accordance with the ICOMOS Guidance on Heritage Impact Assessment for World Cultural Heritage properties for any development plans within the vicinity of the property,
      4. continue to develop methodology and implementation plan for the documentation and conservation of the property in order to guarantee the protection of its authenticity and integrity;
    5. Requests the State Party to:
      1. work out the conservation plan for the excavated remains of the property safeguarding its Outstanding Universal Value and authenticity,
      2. strengthen approaches to visitor management and interpretation through a well-established visitor management plan,
    6. Also requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.

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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6798 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.21 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes The Persian Qanat, Islamic Republic of Iran, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (iii) and (iv);
    3. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Throughout the arid regions of Iran, agricultural and permanent settlements are supported by the ancient qanat system of tapping alluvial aquifers at the heads of valleys and conducting the water along underground tunnels by gravity, often over many kilometres. Shaft wells providing access and ventilation to the tunnels appear as craters from above, following the line of the qanat from water source to agricultural settlement. The eleven qanats representing this system include rest areas for the workers, water reservoirs and watermills. The traditional communal management system still in place allows equitable and sustainable water sharing and distribution.

      Criterion (iii): The Persian Qanat form a historical stratigraphy of past achievements and historical solutions. The vital role of qanat in the formation of various civilisations is so expansive that the basis of civilisation in the desert plateau of Iran has been called “Qanat (or Kariz) Civilisation”. Dispersion of primary settlements on alluvial fans of the inner plateau, desert margins and kavirs (deserts) of Iran has an intimate relation with the distribution pattern of qanat system.

      Criterion (iv): The Persian Qanat is an outstanding example of a technological ensemble illustrating significant stages in the history of human occupation of arid and semi-arid regions in the world. It is the cornerstone of prosperity in desert towns and villages. In arid and semi-arid regions, it has resulted in the creation of a desert style architecture and landscape involving not only the qanats themselves, but also associated structures, such as water reservoirs, water mills, irrigation systems, outstanding desert gardens, as well as urban and rural desert architecture.

      Integrity

      All the selected qanats are still forceful, active and are being used publicly from a functional perspective and has also fully been maintained the integrity of their elements from a physical and structural perspective. 

      Survival of qanats throughout centuries is the result of a traditional management system which has remained intact and has been transferred from distant past thanks to the collaboration of people and users. The system has served as a key factor for keeping the integrity of qanats.

      Authenticity

      The authenticity of the eleven qanats has been respected regarding design, technology, building materials, traditions, techniques, management systems, setting as well as intangible heritage aspects based on the science of restoration, natural environment and the indigenous culture.  Qanats have been founded and constructed based on social collaboration, communal trust and honesty as well as common sense. Furthermore, their stability and authenticity has been managed, preserved, expanded and developed based on such joint cooperation.

      Protection and management requirements

      Traditional management of qanats has a unique value because it has preserved the historical knowledge of generations. This system has been set up by owners, exploiters and ordinary people and has developed and evolved with the passage of time which has made qanats survive until today.

      The eleven qanats are managed under the individual traditional supervision of qanat council. Each qanat has its local qanat council from its region.

      All qanats are under integrated financial and technical supports and at present, conservation and management of all qanats are underway respecting their authenticity and integrity and aiming at conserving universal prominent values of The Persian Qanat

    4. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. collecting data related to each qanat in the regional offices of ICHHTO and making it accessible to members of the local communities,
      2. extending the management strategy and plans to include a risk preparedness strategy and a comprehensive tourism strategy for all property components,
      3. extending the monitoring system to identify the responsible authority for each key indicator,
      4. permanently marking the boundaries of property components and buffer zones on the ground;
    5. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6799 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.22 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes Nan Madol: Ceremonial Centre of Eastern Micronesia, Federated States of Micronesia, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (i), (iii), (iv) and (vi);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The megalithic basalt stone structures of the more than 100 islets that form Nan Madol off the shore of Pohnpei Island comprise the remains of stone palaces, temples, mortuaries and residential domains. They represent the ceremonial centre of the Saudeleur dynasty, an era of vibrant Pacific island culture which underwent dramatic changes of settlement and social organisation 1200-1500 CE. Through its archaeological remains, Nan Madol is tangibly associated with Pohnpei’s continuing social and ceremonial traditions and the authority of the Nahnmwarki.

      Criterion (i): The outstanding monumental megalithic architecture of Nan Madol is demonstrated by the wall construction using massive columnar basalt stones, transported from quarries elsewhere on the island, and laid using a distinctive ‘header-stretcher technique’.

      Criterion (iii): Nan Madol bears exceptional testimony to the development of chiefly societies in the Pacific Islands. The huge scale, technical sophistication and concentration of elaborate megalithic structures of Nan Madol bear testimony to complex social and religious practices of the island societies.

      Criterion (iv): The remains of chiefly dwellings, ritual/ceremonial sites, mortuary structures and domestic sites combine as an outstanding example of a monumental ceremonial centre illustrating the period of development of chiefly societies from around 1000 years ago, associated with increasing island populations and intensification of agriculture.

      Criterion (vi): Nan Madol is an expression of the original development of traditional chiefly institutions and systems of governance in the Pacific Islands that continue into the present in the form of the Nahnmwarki system under which Nan Madol is traditionally owned and managed.

      Integrity

      Nan Madol includes all elements necessary to express it Outstanding Universal Value and is of adequate size to ensure the complete representation of features and processes which convey the property’s significance. There are no intrusive elements from development or modification, and no reconstructions of the original elements. Due to cessation of use for residential purposes by the 1820s, while retaining religious and traditional significance, the property suffers from overgrowth of vegetation, the effects of storm surge and some stonework collapse. The state of conservation of stone structures is now of extreme concern, rendering the integrity of the property vulnerable.

      Authenticity

      The property is authentic in terms of location and setting, intangible culture, spirit and feeling, materials, form and design. The overgrowth of the stone structures and their state of conservation means that many of them are unable to be seen, rendering authenticity vulnerable.

      Protection and management requirements

      Nan Madol is legally protected by the federal government and administered by the Office of National Archives, Culture and Historic Preservation (NACH) through the Historic Preservation Office of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM).  It is protected by the state government of Pohnpei under the Pohnpei Historic and Cultural Preservation Act (2002), administered by the Pohnpei Historic Preservation Office. The FSM Constitution acknowledges the customary interests of the traditional chiefs and the property is customarily protected by the Nahnmwarki Madolenihmw.

      A management committee has been set up involving all stakeholders including traditional owners and this collaboration will be consolidated by passage of the proposed Bill LB 392 (expected to pass in October 2016) to create a Nan Madol Historic Preservation Trust with ownership and management under traditional oversight by the Nahnmwarki Chief. The Management Plan is expected to be completed with international financial and technical assistance by mid-2017. This will include appointment of a designated property manager trained in cultural resource management and strategies for risk preparedness, conservation and tourism as well as an ongoing maintenance and monitoring program.

    4. Also inscribes Nan Madol: Ceremonial Centre of Eastern Micronesia, Federated States of Micronesia, on the List of World Heritage in Danger;
    5. Recommends that the State Party invite a joint World Heritage Centre/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring mission to the property in 2016 to agree on a Desired State of Conservation for the removal of the property from the List of World Heritage in Danger, based on the cultural attributes of Outstanding Universal Value and to be reached through a detailed assessment of the stability of the walls as a base for setting out a conservation strategy and corrective measures that can then be phased and costed. Efforts would then be made with the assistance of ICOMOS and UNESCO to find partners and donors to support this conservation project;
    6. Also recommends that the State Party give urgent consideration to the following:
      1. passing and implementing the new legislation LB 392 (expected by October 2016) which will create a Nan Madol Historic Preservation Trust with ownership and management under traditional oversight by the Nahnmwarki Chief with a Board of traditional authority and will permanently consolidate the resolution of issues regarding ownership and management that was established by the MoU,
      2. extending the management system to include a designated property manager trained in cultural resource management,
      3. developing the management plan to:
        1. include a risk preparedness strategy,
        2. extend the current maintenance program to the full area of the property including removal of silt from the waterways without jeopardizing possible cultural layers on the sea floor,
        3. include the conservation strategy project and corrective measures required to achieve the desired state of conservation,
        4. include a comprehensive tourism strategy to deal with the future impact of tourism on the property;
      4. considering the new UNESCO recommendation on the protection and promotion of museums and collections (17 November 2015) and using the proposed museum to disseminate the Outstanding Universal Value of the property;
    7. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 February 2017 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 41st session in 2017;
    8. Encourages international cooperation to support the conservation project;
    9. Also encourages the submission of Lelu as a serial component when ownership, protection, conservation, funding and management requirements are resolved.

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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6800 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.23 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The nomination of Phu Phrabat Historical Park, Thailand, was withdrawn at the request of the State Party.

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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6801 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.24 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes Stećci Medieval Tombstone Graveyards, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and Serbia, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (iii) and (vi);
    3. Welcomes acceptance of ICOMOS recommendations by the States Parties, namely in reducing the number of components proposed for inscription by removing the “Stare Kuće, Donje Breške, Tuzla” and “Mramorje in Buđ, Pale” components, Bosnia and Herzegovina, modifying the boundaries and buffer zones of the property and amending the name of the property;
    4. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The serial nomination of medieval tombstones (stećci) includes a selection of 4000 stećci at 28 necropolises (out of a total of approximately 70 000 stećci at 3 300 sites) on the territory of four states: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republic of Croatia, Montenegro and Republic of Serbia. Medieval monolithic stone tombstones (stećci) were created in the period from the second half of the 12th century to the 16th century, while they were most intensively hewed during the 14th and 15th century. Stećci bear an exceptional testimony to the medieval culture of Southeast Europe that was developed within a unique historical context in an area where medieval cultures and traditions of the European West, East and South meet. In addition, in some respects, stećci also drew influences from much earlier traditions.

      As much as they are associated with the general medieval sepulchral practice, it is the multitude and monumentality but also the interconfessionality of stećci as elements of cultural heritage that make this region stand out from the overall corpus of the medieval European heritage.

      Criterion (iii): Although immersed in medieval European culture, the historical context and specific regional space where we find them, with traces of earlier influences (prehistoric, ancient and early medieval), stećci, by several aspects, remain a unique phenomenon in the medieval European artistic and archaeological heritage. The 28 selected sites attempt to present all the characteristics of the stećci phenomenon.

      Their main specificity is precisely in their number not recorded anywhere else in Europe – of approximately 70 000 monuments.

      A distinctive feature is also the diversity of their forms. Today, the following basic forms are known to us: slabs, chests, gabled roof tombstones, pillars, and monumental crosses. In the scope of this Nomination, all of them are represented in the selected sites. However, each of them comes in different versions depending on the skills of the craftsmen-stonecutters and the wishes of the owners of the tombstones or clients. Their reliefs are an extraordinary testimony of medieval culture which has disappeared and of which stećci are often the only remaining traces. The reason for this is in the incredible richness of reliefs of different contents – scenes from everyday life, symbolic and religious motives, and decorative reliefs.

      Criterion (vi): Ever since they were first created and especially since the times when they were no longer made (beginning of the 16th century) up until the present day, medieval tombstones – stećci – have been deeply rooted in various traditions and beliefs.

      Those processes exist despite a kind of discontinuity in the historical memory and heritage of these monuments mainly caused by different migrations during the late Middle Ages and Early Modern Age. Therefore, the phenomena associated with stećci (toponyms of the sites, superstitions, folk traditions and tales) show a few very similar patterns encountered in the entire area of outspread, which still speaks of the uniqueness of this cultural phenomenon.

      Throughout the stećci outspread area, it has been noted that a number of cemetery names show respect and admiration for the grandiose dimensions of the tombstones, their age and relief representations (Divsko groblje – Giants’cemetery, Mašete – big stones, Mramori-Mramorje – marble blocks, Grčko groblje – Greek cemetery, Tursko groblje – Turkish cemetery, Kaursko groblje – Giaour’s cemetery).

      For centuries, folk and fairy tales have been drawing their motives from the medieval chivalric milieu carved on stećci attributing their carving and setting to fantastic creatures (fairies, giants) and linking them to legendary wars and conflicts, etc.

      Over a long period of almost 150 years (more precisely as of the second half of the 19th century) of scientific and institutional interest in them, we have witnessed confrontations of different opinions and views as to their archaeological, artistic and historical interpretation.

      The epigraphy and the reliefs on stećci have also significantly influenced contemporary literature as well as other forms of art. They have represented, and still do, an inspirational theme for sculptors (Boško Kućanski), painters (Mario Mikulić, Mirko Kujačić, Zdravko Anić, Lazar Drljača, Ibrahim Novalić, Danko Brkić, Gabrijel Jurkić, Petar Šain, Virgilije Nevjestić, Dževad Hozo, Nedim Tahirović, Seid Hasanefendić), poets (Mehmedalija Mak Dizdar, Skender Kulenović, Petar Gudelj, Janko Bubalo, Ivan Kordić, Kemal Mahmutefendić), filmmakers (Jan Beran), writers (Miroslav Krleža) and photographers (Tošo Dabac, Dragutin Resner, Ado Šahbaz).

      Integrity

      All proposed sites with stećci have been preserved in situ and are in good condition despite all the problems. The borders of the core and buffer zones have completely enclosed the sites aiming to preserve their integrity within the landscape which they are integral part to. Although some of the proposed sites are located along roads, the risk for the monuments is minimized given the constant monitoring by competent authorities as well as restriction of any activity (primarily construction works) in the immediate vicinity of the sites. The strict criteria enabled for the selection of precisely those sites with stećci which are representative of their outstanding universal value.

      Authenticity

      The proposed necropolis with stećci, their archaeological and historical context, the diversity of types of tombstones and the content of inscriptions represent the overall aspects of the phenomenon and the study of stećci.

      The necropolis in the scope of this serial nomination have the highest degree of authenticity among the necropolis with stećci and were therefore selected for this Nomination. Basic documentation work has been conducted on all proposed sites (development of a study of the present situation, shots of the present situation, photographic documentation, drawings and 3D scans in some cases) as a basis for all further conservation and restoration interventions aimed at better conservation and management of each individual site.

      Protection and management requirements

      All components of this serial transnational property enjoy the highest degree of protection in accordance with the legislation of each of the countries, despite different legal and administrative systems for the protection and management of cultural heritage. The management mode for each individual site is defined by individual Management Plans specific in terms of national legislation, legislation of Republika Srpska and the Federation of BiH in the case of Bosnia and Herzegovina and local administrations, as well as the capacities of each of the individual states. There are several priorities in the implementation of these plans in the future, with an emphasis on preventing further deterioration of stećci mainly caused by various climate influences. An interstate coordination is anticipated to be established in the future with regard to the management and conservation of these monuments.

    5. Recommends that the States Parties give consideration to the following:
      1. further improving the consistency of mapping and cataloguing of the selected components of the series in line with the management mechanism,
      2. continuing to improve the state of conservation at selected sites through the development and implementation of active conservation programmes based on the advice of skilled conservators,
      3. developing monitoring indicators to assess the impact of development and tourism on the attributes of the serial property,
      4. ensuring the operational coordination of the various bodies and planning instruments involved in the management of each of the elements that comprise the property in order to ensure the most appropriate management,
      5. integrating a Heritage Impact Assessment and Disaster Risk Management approach into the management system, so as to ensure that any programme or project be assessed in relation to its impact on the Outstanding Universal Value of the property,
    6. Recognizes the exceptional multicultural aspects of the stećci and their contribution to the enhancement of regional cooperation and cooperation among the States Parties thus ensuring peace, reconciliation, stability, sustainable development and sustainable management of common cultural heritage;
    7. Requests the States Parties to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.

    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6802 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.25 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The nomination of the Roman Urbanism of the Zadar Peninsula with the Monumental Complex on the Forum, Croatia, was withdrawn at the request of the State Party.

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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6803 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.26 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes the Archaeological Site of Philippi, Greece, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (iii) and (iv);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The Archaeological Site of Philippi is lying at the foot of an acropolis in north-eastern Greece on the ancient route linking Europe with Asia, the Via Egnatia. The city of Philippi, re-founded by Philip II on a former colony of Thasians in 356 BCE, was reshaped by the Romans into a "small Rome" with its elevation to a Colonia Augusta of the Roman Empire in the decades following the Battle of Philippi. The vibrant Hellenistic city of Philip II, of which the walls and their gates, the theatre and the funerary heroon (temple) are to be seen, was adorned and transformed with Roman public buildings including the Forum and a monumental terrace with temples to its north. Later the city became a centre of Christian faith and pilgrimage deriving from the visit of the Apostle Paul in 49/50 CE and the remains of Christian basilicas and the octagonal church testify to its importance as a metropolitan see.

      Criterion (iii): Philippi is an exceptional testimony to the incorporation of regions into the Roman Empire as demonstrated by the city’s layout and architecture as a colony resembling a “small Rome”. The remains of its churches are exceptional testimony to the early establishment and growth of Christianity.

      Criterion (iv): The monuments of Philippi exemplify various architectural types and reflect the development of architecture during the Roman and Early Christian period. The Forum stands out as an example of such a public space in the eastern Roman provinces. The Octagon Church, the transept Basilica, and the domed Basilica stand out as types of Early Christian architecture.

      Integrity

      The walled city includes all elements necessary to convey its values, and is not subject to development or neglect. The modern asphalted road, closed in 2014, which essentially follows the route of the ancient Via Egnatia, will be dismantled east of the west entrance to the site near the Museum.

      Authenticity

      The walled city was subject to major destruction in the earthquake of 620 CE. Many stones and elements of the buildings including inscriptions and mosaic and opus sectile floors remain in situ from that time, although some stones were subsequently reused in later buildings. Modern constructions and interventions at the site have been generally limited to archaeological investigations and necessary measures for the protection and enhancement of the site. For the most part the principle of reversibility has been respected and the walled city can be considered authentic in terms of form and design, location and setting.

      Protection and management requirements

      The property and buffer zone are protected at the highest level under the antiquities Law 3028/2002 ‘On the Protection of Antiquities and Cultural Heritage in General’ as re-designated in 2012, and as protected zone A in 2013. This covers both State and privately-owned land and, except for the buffer zone extension in the south-east corner which covers part of the adjacent town, is a ‘non-construction’ zone. The area of the adjacent town is covered by planning requirements to report archaeological finds during works. The boundaries of the property and buffer zone are clearly defined on the maps and the property will be fully fenced in the near future.

      The property is managed at the local level by the Ephorate of Antiquities, the Regional Service of the General Directorate of Antiquities and Cultural Heritage, within the Ministry of Culture and Sports. The Management Plan was drafted in 2014 and will be implemented by a seven-member committee including representatives of government and municipal agencies and co-ordinated by the Head of the local Ephorate of Antiquities. A conservation strategy aimed at unifying and upgrading the property and identifying the priority projects and funding sources will be included in the Management Plan, together with a co-ordinated archaeological research plan aimed at better understanding and interpretation of the site and an overall database as a basis for monitoring and conservation.

    4. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. extending the management plan to include:
        1. the conservation strategy identifying the priority projects and showing the allocation and sources of funding for these,
        2. the co-ordinated archaeological research plan aimed at better understanding and interpretation of the site,
        3. an overall database as a basis for monitoring and conservation,
        4. increased site maintenance and protection of wall and floor finishes;
      2. marking clearly and permanently on the ground the boundaries of the property components and buffer zones; and fully fencing the property.

    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6804 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.27 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes the Antequera Dolmens Site, Spain, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (i), (iii) and (iv);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The Antequera Dolmens Site is a serial property made up of three megalithic monuments: the Menga Dolmen, the Viera Dolmen and the Tholos of El Romeral, and two natural monuments, La Peña de los Enamorados and El Torcal de Antequera. Built during the Neolithic and the Bronze Age out of large stone blocks that form chambers and spaces with lintelled roofs (Menga and Viera) or false cupolas (El Romeral), and used for rituals and funerary purposes, the Antequera megaliths are widely recognised examples of European Megalithism. The megalithic structures are presented in the guise of the natural landscape (buried beneath earth tumuli) and their orientation is based on two natural monuments: La Peña de los Enamorados and El Torcal. These are two indisputable visual landmarks within the property.

      The colossal scale of megaliths characterised by the use of large stone blocks that form chambers and spaces with lintelled roofs (Menga and Viera) or false cupolas (El Romeral) attest to exceptional architectural planning from those who built them and create unique architectural forms. The intimate interaction of the megalithic monuments with nature, seen in the deep well inside Menga and in the orientation of Menga and El Romeral towards presumably sacred mountains (La Peña de los Enamorados and El Torcal), emphasise the uniqueness of this prehistoric burial and ritual landscape. The three tombs, with the singular nature of their designs, and technical and formal differences, bring together two great Iberian megalithic architectural traditions and a variety of architectonic types, a rich sample of the extensive variety within European megalithic funeral architecture.

      Criterion (i): The number, size, weight and volume of stone blocks transported and assembled in the basin of Antequera, using rudimentary technology, and the architectural characteristics of the monuments formed by these three megaliths, makes the Antequera Dolmens one of the most important engineering and architectural works of European Prehistory and one of the most important and best known examples of European Megalithism. As such, the dolmens of Menga and Viera and the tholos of El Romeral definitely represent a prime example of the creative genius of humanity.

      Criterion (iii): Antequera Dolmens Site provides an exceptional insight into the funerary and ritual practices of a highly organised prehistoric society of the Neolithic and Bronze Age in the Iberian Peninsula. The Dolmens of Antequera materialize an extraordinary conception of the megalithic landscape, being exponents of an original relationship with the natural monuments to which they are intrinsically linked. Differentiating themselves from the canonical orientations towards sunrise, the megalithic monuments shows anomalous orientations: Menga is the only dolmen in continental Europe that faces towards an anthropomorphic mountain such as La Peña de los Enamorados; and the Tholos of El Romeral, facing the El Torcal mountain range, is one of the few cases in the entire Iberian Peninsula where the orientation is towards the western half of the sky. This assembly of the three megalithic monuments together with the two natural monuments represents a very distinctive cultural tradition which has now disappeared.

      Criterion (iv): Antequera Dolmens Site is an outstanding example of a megalithic monumental ensemble, comprised of the three megalithic monuments (the Menga and Viera dolmens and the tholos of El Romeral), that illustrate a significant stage of human history when the first large ceremonial monuments were built in Western Europe. The three different types of megalithic architecture seen in this ensemble of dolmens, which are representative of the two great Iberian megalithic traditions (lintelled architecture in the cases of Menga and Viera and the architecture of El Romeral’s false cupola ceiling), and the unique relationship between the dolmens and the surrounding landscape of Antequera (the three megalithic monuments are buried beneath earth tumuli and two megaliths are oriented towards the natural monuments of La Peña de los Enamorados and El Torcal), reinforces the originality of this property.

      Integrity

      The three Antequera megaliths conserve all their constitutive elements and still conserve their unitary character. Therefore they are of adequate size to express their universal value as outstanding examples of megalithic architecture. The three monuments are in good condition and their original structures are almost entirely intact, both the interior rocky structure as well as the tumuli that cover them. Over time, a number of conservation, consolidation and restoration interventions have been carried out that are recognisable and have been preceded by, or have coincided with, archaeological research phases and qualified technical analyses. However, the peri-urban industrial/commercial modern setting in which the three megaliths are located, which have been altered in the past two decades by urban and infrastructure development challenges the integrity of the series. With regard to the natural sites, they have largely maintained this condition in terms of geomorphological configuration and singularity of flora and fauna, without experiencing any considerable anthropic transformations.

      Authenticity

      The series of investigations that have been carried out are conclusive and unanimous with regard to ascribing the monuments to the said era, the authenticity of the chambers’ stone materials and the area where the tumuli are found. The form and design of each of the three tombs have remained remarkably unaltered in spite of necessary repairs to the fabric and some protection interventions. All components of the property have a tremendous genius loci and sense and spirit of place. The authenticity of each and every one of the component parts in this series is unquestionable. Also, the coexistence in Antequera of the two great megalithic traditions on the Iberian Peninsula and Western Europe has been certified: the Neolithic tradition of lintelled structures and the Chalcolithic tradition of false cupola chambers.

      Protection and management requirements

      Both the megalithic monuments as well as the natural spaces have been listed and preserved with the relevant protection, heritage or environmental laws, whether these are national, regional or local, which provides them with the required institutional conservation measures. The dolmens of Menga and Viera, and the tholos of El Romeral have individually been declared as Monuments and are also an Archaeological Area that has been declared an Asset of Cultural Interest (BIC). La Peña de Los Enamorados, considered a BIC by the Ministry of Law due to the rock paintings that it contains, is also declared an Archaeological Area BIC. Meanwhile, the El Toro cave (in El Torcal) is currently in the process of gaining status as an Archaeological Area BIC. Due to its natural values, La Peña de los Enamorados is also classified as an Outstanding Site, whilst El Torcal has been declared a Natural Reserve (one of the highest levels of protection provided for by regional environmental law) and a Special Protection Area, and is thus included in the Natura 2000 Network of nature areas within Europe. This is a mainly publicly owned space managed by the Environment and Water Agency, which reports to the Autonomous Government of Andalusia. As a Natural Reserve included in the Andalusian Network of Protected Natural Areas (RENPA), it has its own Natural Resources Management Plan (PORN).

      Legal protection is also guaranteed for the buffer zone, given that measures derived from heritage laws themselves have been added to urban planning conditions with a view to protecting the area. The Management Plan for the property includes interventions concerning the conservation and enhancement of the megalithic monuments and their surroundings, which are included in the Master Plan for the Archaeological Ensemble of the Dolmens of Antequera, together with the measures included in the aforementioned PORN for El Torcal. The heritage management process is restricted to three areas: the Archaeological Ensemble, La Peña de los Enamorados and the area of El Torcal. All of them are publicly owned, with the exception of La Peña, which is privately owned; however, under the legal system for Archaeological Zones declared as Properties of Cultural Interest, actions and public management measures may be implemented to maintain and enhance the site. A Special Protection Plan of Antequera Dolmens Site is under preparation and will set out guidelines for the different zones that have an impact on the integrity of the property.

      A Coordination Council has been set up for the Antequera Dolmens Site, which is made up of representatives of the administrators and owners of the different component sites, with CADA (Archaeological Ensemble of the Antequera Dolmens) being the agency solely responsible for representing and monitoring the management of the property.

    4. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. finalising the Special Protection Plan of Antequera Dolmens Site and revising the General Plan for Urban Zoning in order to address the major development pressures that affect the property,
      2. developing monitoring indicators to assess the impact of development and tourism on the attributes of the serial property,
      3. ensuring the coordination of the various bodies and planning instruments involved in the management of each of the elements that comprise the property in order to enhance its management,
      4. integrating a Heritage Impact Assessment approach into the management system, so as to ensure that any programme or project be assessed in their impacts on the Outstanding Universal Value of the property;
    5. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2019 a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for review by ICOMOS.

    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6805 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.28 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes the Archaeological Site of Ani, Turkey, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (ii), (iii) and (iv);
    3. Takes note of the provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Ani is located in the northeast of Turkey, 42 km from the city of Kars, on a secluded triangular plateau overlooking a ravine that forms the natural border with Armenia. This medieval city that was once one of the cultural and commercial centres on the Silk Road, is characterized by architecture that combines a variety of domestic, religious and military structures, creating a panorama of medieval urbanism built up over the centuries by successive Christian and Muslim dynasties. Inhabited since the Bronze Age, Ani flourished in the 10th and the 11th centuries AD, when it became a capital of the medieval Armenian kingdom of the Bagratids and profited from control of one branch of the Silk Road. Later, under Byzantine, Seljuk, and Georgian sovereignty, it maintained its status as an important crossroads for merchant caravans, controlling trade routes between Byzantium, Persia, Syria and Central Asia. The Mongol invasion, along with a devastating earthquake in 1319 and a change in trade routes, marked the beginning of the decline of the city. It was all but abandoned by the 18th century.

      The continuity of the settlement at Ani for almost 2500 years was thanks to its geographical location, on an easily defensible plateau that was surrounded by fertile river valleys, at an important gate of the Silk Roads into Anatolia, which made it an important town from the strategic point of view. This importance was determinative in its selection as a capital city of the Armenian Kingdom, to which Ani owes its high cultural development that found its best expression in the unique architecture of the “Ani school” through a socio-economic organization comparable only to the most developed examples of its contemporary Europe, in its capacity to attract the best artists and artisans of the region.

      The location of the city on the Silk Roads, as being one of the gateways to Anatolia, contributed to the rapid growth of the city as well as the transmission and amalgamation of different cultures. Architectural traditions that evolved in the Caucasus, Iran, Turkestan and Khurasan, were translated into stone, creating a unique medieval city.

      The religious monuments of Zoroastrian, Christian and Muslim influence, as well as public and domestic buildings, are witnesses to Ani’s multiculturalism. It was a multi-cultural centre, with all the richness and diversity of Medieval Armenian, Byzantine, Seljuk and Georgian urbanism, architecture, and art development.

      Criterion (ii): Ani was a meeting place for Armenian, Georgian and diverse Islamic cultural traditions that are reflected in the architectural design, material and decorative details of the monuments. The remains of this multi-cultural life in Ani are easily traced in the use of architectural techniques and styles belonging to different civilizations. New styles, which emerged as a result of cross-cultural interactions, have turned into a new architectural language peculiar to Ani – the “Ani school”. The creation of this new language expressed in the design, craftsmanship and decoration of Ani has also been influential in the wider region of Anatolia and Caucasia

      Criterion (iii): Ani was a centre for a multi-national and multi-religious population who left their artistic and architectural traces there. Ani bears exceptional testimony to Armenian cultural, artistic, architectural and urban design development and it is an extraordinary representation of Armenian religious architecture, reflecting its techniques, style and material characteristics. Ani is also a significant place for Turkish history. Grand Seljuk traditions met with structures in Ani for the first time and spread to Anatolia from there.

      Criterion (iv): With its military, religious and civil buildings, Ani offers a wide panorama of medieval architectural development thanks to the presence at the site of almost all the architectural types that emerged in the region in the course of the six centuries from 7th to 13th centuries AD. It is also considered a rare settlement where nearly all of the plan types developed in Armenian Church architecture between the 4th and 8th centuries AD can be seen together. The urban enclosure of Ani is also an important example of a medieval architectural ensemble with its monumentality, design and quality, as well as the tunnels and caves beneath Ani plateau, which connect to the surrounding volcanic tufa setting of deep river valleys.

      Integrity

      All the elements that constitute the basic values of Ani are located within the boundaries of the area. The city walls, religious and domestic buildings, as well as the rock-cut constructions along parts of the Arpaçay and Bostanlar Creeks, are all located within the boundaries of the 1st Degree Archaeological Conservation area.

      Authenticity

      The property consists of impressively standing monumental buildings, in a partly hidden urban context, over an invisible landscape of underground tunnels and caves surrounded by deep river valleys that altogether convey the Outstanding Universal Value of the property as a relic medieval city. Despite intact conservation of all these components to a great extent, without any modern development, Ani was affected from several wars and earthquakes in its history, which caused demolition and destruction in its architectural remains to a certain extent. Nevertheless, their remarkable state of preservation, without any historic or modern period change, in the face of these calamities has been considered as one of the unique values of the property.

      Protection and management requirements

      The archaeological site of Ani has been registered on the national inventory since 1988, as the 1st Degree Archaeological Conservation Site that is surrounded by the 3rd Degree Archaeological Conservation Site, with continual enlargements in site boundaries. These registrations put the property under the protection of Turkey’s National Law No. 2863 on Code of Protection of Cultural and Natural Properties that requires the approval of Kars Regional Council for the Protection of Cultural Assets for all plans and projects to be implemented in the registered sites.

      The Ministry of Culture and Tourism, which is the main responsible government body for conservation and management of the site, is organized at both central and local levels. The General Directorate of Cultural Heritage and Museums centrally regulates the activities of its local branches and fulfils certain tasks regarding monument restoration and World Heritage issues. Local branches, which are relevant in this case, are the Kars Regional Council for Conservation of Cultural Heritage, the Erzurum Directorate of Surveying and Monuments, and the Directorate of the Kars Museum.

      The protection measures taken in recent years by the State Party have greatly protected the most important monuments of the property. Conservation Oriented Development Plan for the two registered sites was approved in 2011 through, a process based on scientific principals and the inclusion of stakeholders at different levels.

      Strategic Conservation Master Plan, which is prepared by the Ministry with scientific support from academicians was approved by the Ministry on the 3rd of February, 2016. It lists the provisions of all legal conservation documents related to the site, includes an updated SWOT analysis as well as interrelated policies and principles, which are reviewed in reference to the management plan.

      The Management Plan for the property was approved on 30 March 2015. Priorities set for the period 2015-2020 in the two plans include emergency measures against seismic and environmental risks to ensure the intact survival of monumental buildings, context excavations and research to reveal their urban setting, improvement of visitor and research facilities at the site, enhancement of Ocaklı Village through better integration with the property, and educational programmes towards these ends.

    4. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. enhance research and documentation of the natural landscape, urban development, architectural structures and underground spaces in the Archaeological Site of Ani and its buffer zone in order to ensure their inclusion in conservation and site management strategies and plans,
      2. further present an accurate and balanced representation of the complex history and development of the property,
      3. further improve the Strategic Conservation Master Plan in order to present a more comprehensive needs assessment of each listed monument, as well as the required interventions and priority areas, as the basis for conservation and monitoring of the property,
      4. find alternative solutions for the current inappropriate use of pasture areas and of the rock-cut caves in Bostanlar Creek and Arpaçay Creek within the 1st Degree Archaeological Conservation area,
      5. improve the interpretation and presentation of the property,
      6. ensure the involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the management of the property, as well as international cooperation for conservation and restoration work,
      7. develop a monitoring plan for the seismic activity of the micro-zone of the property,
      8. integrate a Heritage Impact Assessment approach into the management system, so as to ensure that any project regarding the property be assessed in relation to its impacts on the attributes that convey the Outstanding Universal Value of the property;
    5. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017, a report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6806 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.29 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,
    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes the Gorham's Cave Complex, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criterion (iii);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Located on the eastern side of the Rock of Gibraltar, steep limestone cliffs contain four caves with extensive archaeological and palaeontological deposits that provide evidence of Neanderthal occupation over a span of 100,000 years. These caves have provided extensive evidence of Neanderthal life, including rare evidence of exploitation of birds and marine animals for food; and use of bird feathers and abstract rock engravings, both indicating new evidence of the cognitive abilities of the Neanderthals. The sites are complemented by their steep limestone cliff settings, and the present-day flora and fauna of Gibraltar, much of which can be also identified in the rich palaeo-environmental evidence from the excavations. While long-term scientific research is continuing, these sites have contributed substantially to the debates about the Neanderthal and human evolution. The attributes that express this value are the striking cluster of caves containing intact archaeological deposits that provide evidence of Neanderthal and early modern human occupation of Gibraltar and the landscape setting which assists in presenting the natural resources and environmental context of Neanderthal life.

      Criterion (iii): Gorham's Cave Complex provides an exceptional testimony to the occupation, cultural traditions and material culture of Neanderthal and early modern human populations through a period spanning approximately 120,000 years. This is expressed by the rich archaeological evidence in the caves, the rare rock engravings at Gorham’s Caves (dated to more than 39,000 years ago), rare evidence of Neanderthal exploitation of birds and marine animals for food, and the ability of the deposits to depict the climatic and environmental conditions of the peninsula over this vast span of time. The archaeological and scientific potential of the caves continues to be explored through archaeological research and scientific debates, providing continuing opportunities for understanding Neanderthal life, including their capacity for abstract thinking.

      Integrity

      The boundary includes all elements necessary to express the Outstanding Universal Value of this property, including the setting of the caves in relation to the topography and vegetation of Gibraltar (limestone cliffs, fossil sand dunes, fossil beaches, scree slopes, shorelines and flora and fauna). The property is vulnerable to sea level rises, flooding and other effects of climate change.

      Authenticity

      The authenticity of this property is demonstrated by the substantial stratified archaeological deposits in the caves, the landforms that contain the caves and demonstrate the geomorphological history of Gibraltar, and the cliff vegetation and fauna that can be associated with the environmental conditions of the past.

      Protection and management requirements

      The property and most of the buffer zone are located within the Gibraltar Nature Reserve (Upper Rock Nature Reserve). The property and its buffer zone are given legal protection by Gibraltar Heritage Trust Act (1989), the Nature Protection Act (1991) the Town Planning Act (1999), the Town Planning (Environment Impact Assessment) Regulations (2000), and the Nature Conservation Area (Upper Rock) Designation Order (2013). The individual caves containing evidence of Neanderthal and early modern human occupation are protected as Schedule 1 Category A (maximum protection) sites under the Gibraltar Heritage Trust Ordinance.

      Development is regulated by the Town Planning Act and by implementation of policies in the Gibraltar Development Plan (2009), including the 2014 Town Planner’s amendments. Planning controls and procedures are enforced by the Development and Planning Commission.

      The area of sea adjacent to the property is located within the Eastern Marine Conservation Zone, protected as a marine area of conservation through European Union legislation (European Marine Special Area of Conservation), and Gibraltar legislation (Marine Nature Reserve Regulations (1995), the Marine Strategy Regulations (2011) and the Marine Protection Regulations (2014)).

      The property is managed by the Gibraltar Museum. The Executive Management Group (comprised of relevant government agencies) oversees the implementation of the management system, assisted by the Museum’s multi-disciplinary World Heritage team. The Executive Management Group reports to a Steering Committee (Advisory Forum) which includes a wide spectrum of stakeholders. The International Research and Conservation Committee assists in establishing research programs and reviewing scientific outcomes. Levels of resourcing, including staffing are reviewed annually.

      Management plans are in place for the property and for the (larger) Gibraltar Nature Reserve. The latter will be revised to ensure compatibility with the World Heritage inscription and to ensure priority is given to the retention of the Outstanding Universal Value of the property. The management system is further supported by the Risk Preparedness Plan, Research and Conservation Strategy and Integrated Visitor Strategy. A five-year Archaeological Excavation Action Plan (2016-2020) outlines the planned work and addresses the need to balance excavation and the conservation of deposits.

      While visitor pressure is not a current threat, it is likely that visitation will increase. Access to the caves is strictly controlled, and visitors must be accompanied by a guide approved by the Director of the Gibraltar Museum. Monitoring is in place and the carrying capacity of the property is reviewed annually. Implementation of the Integrated Visitor Strategy will improve the visitor experiences and presentation of the Outstanding Universal Value.

    4. Recommends that the State Party give consideration to the following:
      1. regularly updating the five-year Archaeological Excavation Action Plan to: assist with the monitoring of the state of conservation of the property; strengthen the role of the International Research and Conservation Committee; underpin the annual review and planning processes; and ensure continued maintenance of scientific standards for excavations and dissemination of results,
      2. establishing Heritage Impact Assessment processes for future proposals for new buildings, adaptive re-use of historic structures and planned changes to facilities located within leased lands in the buffer zone,
      3. continuing the assessment of the heritage significance of the features of military history, graffiti and infrastructure located within the property in order to clarify which elements can be removed or adapted to other site management purposes,
      4. completing and implementing the integrated management database as a priority to ensure ongoing effective management of the property,
      5. revising the integrated visitor strategy in light of changed proposals for visitor management, ensuring coherence in light of the delivery of interpretation in a number of locations,
      6. completing the current revisions to the Management Plan for the Gibraltar Nature Reserve ensuring that it is consistent with the provisions of the Management Plan, and that the retention of the Outstanding Universal Value is given clear priority across both documents,
      7. considering investigating the scientific potential of Hyaena and Bennett’s Caves using non-invasive methods,
      8. fully implementing the monitoring of the property, ensuring a focus on the attributes of Outstanding Universal Value.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6807 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.30 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Refers the examination of the nomination of Key Works of Modern Architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright, United States of America, on the World Heritage List, in order to allow the State Party, with the advice of ICOMOS and the World Heritage Centre if requested to:
      1. redefine the rationale for a series of components (not necessarily the ones currently nominated) that might have the potential to justify Outstanding Universal Value through conveying the way one or more exceptional facets of the oeuvre of Frank Lloyd Wright influenced the architecture of the 20th century,
      2. define more structured management for individual components coordinated by the Frank Lloyd Wright World Heritage Council,
      3. examine and pursue opportunities to revise the nominated property boundaries, expand buffer zones and enhance protection in and beyond the buffer zones for component sites in relation to the attributes of potential Outstanding Universal Value;
    3. Encourages the State Party to consider inviting ICOMOS to offer advice on the above recommendations in the framework of the Upstream Process.
    ]]>
    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6808 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.31 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier, an Outstanding Contribution to the Modern Movement, Argentina, Belgium, France, Germany, India, Japan and Switzerland, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (i), (ii) and (vi);
    3. Takes note of the following provisional Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      Chosen from the work of architect Le Corbusier that survives in eleven countries on four continents, the sites in seven countries on three continents, implemented over a period of half a century, attest to, for the first time in the history of architecture, the internationalization of architectural practice across the entire planet.

      The seventeen sites together represent an outstanding response to some of the fundamental issues of architecture and society in the 20th century. All were innovative in the way they reflect new concepts, all had a significant influence over wide geographical areas, and together they disseminated ideas of the Modern Movement throughout the world. Despite its diversity, the Modern Movement was a major and essential socio-cultural and historical entity of the 20th century, which has to a large degree remained the basis of the architectural culture of the 21st century. From the 1910s to the 1960s, the Modern Movement, in meeting the challenges of contemporary society, aimed to instigate a unique forum of ideas at a world level, invent a new architectural language, modernize architectural techniques and meet the social and human needs of modern man. The series provides an outstanding response to all these challenges.

      Some of the component sites immediately assumed an iconic status and had world-wide influence. These include the Villa Savoye, as an icon for the Modern Movement; Unité d’habitation in Marseille as a major prototype of a new housing model; Chapelle Notre-Dame-du-Haut de Ronchamp for its revolutionary approach to religious architecture; the Cabanon de Le Corbusier as an archetypal minimum cell based on ergonomic and functionalist approaches; and the Maisons de la Weissenhof-Siedlung that became known worldwide, as part of the Werkbund exhibition.

      Other sites acted as catalysts for spreading ideas around their own regions, such as Maison Guiette, that spurred the development of the Modern Movement in Belgium and the Netherlands; the Maison du Docteur Curutchet that exerted a fundamental influence in South America; the Musée National des Beaux-Arts de l’Occident as the prototype of the globally transposable Museum of Unlimited Growth which cemented ideas of the Modern Movement in Japan; and the Complexe du Capitole that had a considerable influence across the Indian subcontinent, where it symbolized the Indian’s accession to modernity.

      Many of the sites reflect new architectural concepts, principles, and technical features. The Petite villa au bord du Léman, is an early expression of minimalist needs as is also crystallized in the Cabanon de Le Corbusier. Le Corbusier’s Five Points of a New Architecture are transcribed iconically in Villa Savoye. Immeuble Molitor is an example of the application of these points to a residential block, while they were also applied to houses, such as the Cité Frugès, and reinterpreted in the Maison Curutchet, in the Couvent Sainte-Marie-de-la-Tourette and in the Musée National des Beaux-Arts de l’Occident. The glass-walled apartment building had its prototype in the Immeuble Molitor.

      A few sites created major trends in the Modern Movement, Purism, Brutalism, and a move towards a sculptural form of architecture. The inaugural use of Purism can be seen in the Maisons La Roche et Jeanneret, Cité Frugès and the Maison Guiette, the Unité d’Habitation played a pioneering role in promoting the trend of Brutalism, while La Ronchamp and the Complexe du Capitole promoted sculptural forms.

      Innovation and experimentation with materials of architectural components are reflected in the independent structure of concrete beams of the Maisons de la Weissenhof-Siedlung, while pre-stressed reinforced concrete was used in the Couvent de La Tourette. In the Complexe du Capitole, concern for natural air-conditioning and energy saving, led to the use of sunscreens, double-skinned roofs, and reflecting pools for the catchment of rainwater and air cooling.

      Standardisation – part of the search for perfection – is seen in the Unité d’Habitation de Marseille, a prototype intended for mass production, while the Petite villa au bord du Lac Léman set out the standard for a single span minimal house, and le Cabanon de Le Corbusier a standard, minimum unit for living. The modulor, a harmonic system based on human scale, was used for the exterior spaces of the Complexe du Capitole, which reflect the silhouette of a man with raised arm.

      The idea of buildings designed around the new needs of ‘modern man in the machine age’, is exemplified in the light new workspaces of Manufacture à Saint-Dié, while the avant-guard housing at the Cité Frugès, and the affordable Maisons de la Weissenhof-Siedlung, demonstrate the way new approaches were not intended for a tiny fraction of society but rather for the population as a whole. By contrast the Immeuble Clarté was intended to revolutionise middle class housing. The Athens Charter, as revised by Le Corbusier, promoted the concept of balance between the collective and the individual, and had its prototype in the Unité d’habitation, while the Complexe du Capitole, the focal point of the plan for the city of Chandigarh, is seen as the most complete contribution to its principles and to the idea of the Radiant City.

      Criterion (i): The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier represents a masterpiece of human creative genius which provides an outstanding response to certain fundamental architectural and social challenges of the 20th century.

      Criterion (ii): The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier exhibits an unprecedented interchange of human values, on a worldwide scale over half a century, in relation to the birth and development of the Modern Movement.

      The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier revolutionized architecture by demonstrating, in an exceptional and pioneering manner, the invention of a new architectural language that made a break with the past.

      The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier marks the birth of three major trends in modern architecture: Purism, Brutalism and sculptural architecture.

      The global influence reached by The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier on four continents is a new phenomenon in the history of architecture and demonstrates its unprecedented impact.

      Criterion (vi): The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier is directly and materially associated with ideas of the Modern Movement, of which the theories and works possessed outstanding universal significance in the twentieth century. The series represents a “New Spirit” that reflects a synthesis of architecture, painting and sculpture.

      The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier materializes the ideas of Le Corbusier that were powerfully relayed by the International Congress of Modern Architecture (CIAM) from 1928.

      The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier is an outstanding reflection of the attempts of the Modern Movement to invent a new architectural language, to modernize architectural techniques, and to respond to the social and human needs of modern man.

      The contribution made by the Architectural Work of Le Corbusier is not merely the result of an exemplary achievement at a given moment, but the outstanding sum of built and written proposals steadfastly disseminated worldwide through half a century.

      Integrity

      The integrity of the series as a whole is adequate to demonstrate the way Le Corbusier’s buildings reflects not only the development and influence of the Modern Movement but the way they were part of its transmission around the world. 

      The integrity of most of the component sites is good. At Cité Frugès, Pessac, within the property, new buildings on three parcels of the site - one of which included a standardised house by Le Corbusier, which was destroyed during the war - are inconsistent with the architect’s concepts. At Villa Savoye and the adjacent gardener’s house, integrity is partly compromised by the Lycée and sports fields built on three sides of the original meadow that surrounded the villa in the 1950s. The setting of this site is fragile. At the Maisons de la Weissenhof-Siedlung, Stuttgart, war-time destruction and post-war reconstruction, has led to the collective integrity of the model settlement being affected by the loss of ten houses out of twenty-one.

      There is recent loss of integrity at Ronchamp and La Porte Molitor. At Ronchamp, where Le Corbusier’s structure overlaid a centuries-old pilgrimage site, the integrity of the site has been partly compromised by a new visitor centre and a nunnery near the chapel which cut into the contemplative hillside setting of Le Corbusier’s structure.

      At Immeuble locatif à La Porte Molitor, a rugby stadium has been constructed right in front of the glass façade of the apartment block.

      Authenticity

      The series clearly demonstrates how it adds up to more than the sum of its component parts.

      For most of the individual component sites, the authenticity is good in relation to how well the attributes of the site can be said to reflect the overall Outstanding Universal Value of the series. At Cité Frugès, on three plots houses were constructed with traditional houses instead of Corbusian structures, while elsewhere in the urban landscape, there is a partial loss of authenticity through neglect and interior changes. At l’Unité d’habitation, the fire of 2012 destroyed a small part of the building. This has now been totally reconstructed to the original design, but with some reduction in authenticity. The authenticity of the existing Capitol Complex in Chandigarh could be impacted if either or both of the governor’s palace or the museum of knowledge were now to be constructed, an eventuality that has apparently been discussed.

      At the National Museum of Western Art in Japan, the original intention for the forecourt of the Museum appears to be as a wide open space. Forecourt planting in 1999 tends to detract from the presentation of the building, its key views and the setting.

      In terms of materials, some sites have been restored and partly reconstructed in recent years, after neglect or disfigurement. Overall, the modifications can be seen to be reasonable and proportionate. Comparing the sites to other inscribed 20th century houses, reveals that these also share similar slightly diminished levels of authenticity.

      Protection and management requirements

      Many of the components received early protection in their respective countries, mostly in the two decades following Le Corbusier’s death. Some, like the Maisons de la Weissenhof-Siedlung in Stuttgart and the Unité d’habitation in Marseille, were given protection during Le Corbusier’s lifetime. The nomination dossier sets out for each component the relevant forms of legislative protection. All component sites are protected at a national/federal level and their buffer zones are adequately protected by either legislation or planning mechanisms. Given the importance of detail and setting for these 20th century buildings, it is crucial that their protection is sufficiently encompassing and sensitive to allow for protection of interiors, exteriors, context and setting.

      In most of the sites, conservation measures are appropriate and are based on long-standing conservation experience and methodology. Conservation work is programmed and entrusted to specialists with high levels of skill and expertise. Conservation treatment is combined with regular maintenance, including the involvement of inhabitants, local communities, and public associations. There are conservation issues in the Chapel at Ronchamp. There is now an urgent need to implement the agreed conservation programme. There is also an urgent need for a Conservation plan to be prepared for Chandigarh.

      A Standing Conference has been established for the overall series and will coordinate the management of the property, advise States Parties and implement actions for promotion and enhancement of the property. An Association of Le Corbusier Sites has been set up to bring together all the local authorities in whose territories sites have been nominated. Its main objectives are coordination, raising public awareness, sharing conservation experience, overall coordination and management of the series, and implementation of management plans for each of the component sites. The involvement of the expertise of the Fondation Le Corbusier – that has the moral rights over Le Corbusier’s oeuvre – is crucial for appropriate management and conservation of the series, especially in those cases where the properties are in private hands other than the Fondation. Within both France and Switzerland coordinating committees have been set up to oversee the management of sites in those countries.

      What remains unclear is how dialogue is undertaken between countries in relation to sensitive development projects. There would be a need for contributing States Parties to have knowledge of, and opportunities to comment on, proposed development in a component site that might compromise the value of the overall series. 

      Local management plans have been drawn up for each component site. These have been implemented on a partnership basis between owners and the cultural, heritage and planning departments of the local authorities in whose area they are sited. At Ronchamp the management system needs strengthening to ensure the security of the site. At Doctor Curutchet’s house, greater supervision of development in the setting is needed.

      Given the special problems associated with the conservation of 20th century architecture, a continuous involvement of (inter)national specialists on the conservation of Modern architectural heritage is also essential. In Switzerland the federal administration can call such specialized experts for advice to support the local conservationists (and has done so already). A similar approach is highly recommended for other countries.

      The current staffing levels and levels of expertise and training are high in all sites and mechanisms to allow liaison between sites have been put in place. Nonetheless, there appears to be a need for more capacity building on the processes of impact assessment and a need to formalise and clearly define conservation approaches and procedures across the series.

      Model monitoring indicators developed for two properties in Switzerland will be developed for the rest of the series by the end of 2016.

    4. Recommends that the States Parties, with the support of ICOMOS if requested, give consideration to the following:
      1. introducing the Heritage Impact Assessment procedures for proposed development at all component sites,
      2. developing monitoring indicators for all component sites,
      3. developing agreed overall conservation approaches and procedures for the series,
      4. considering how the power of the Standing Conference might be refined to allow full understanding by all States Parties of major development proposals in all component sites, in relation to their potential impact on the overall series,
      5. submitting the Management plan for Chandigarh,
      6. progressing with the Conservation Plan for Chandigarh,
      7. clarifying the protection of the buffer zone for Maison Guiette,
      8. clarifying the implications of the new Heritage Law in France,
      9. submitting proposals from the Standing Conference on the approach to any further extensions to the series and on its ultimate scope;
    5. Requests the States Parties to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a report on the above-mentioned recommendations for examination by the World Heritage Committee at its 42nd session in 2018.

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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6809 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST
    40 COM 8B.32 Examination of nominations of cultural properties to the World Heritage List The World Heritage Committee,

    1. Having examined Documents WHC/16/40.COM/8B and WHC/16/40.COM/INF.8B1,
    2. Inscribes Antigua Naval Dockyard and Related Archaeological Sites, Antigua and Barbuda, on the World Heritage List on the basis of criteria (ii) and (iv);
    3. Adopts the following Statement of Outstanding Universal Value:

      Brief synthesis

      The Antigua Naval Dockyard and its Related Archaeological Sites consists of a group of Georgian Naval structures, set within a walled enclosure, on a naturally-occurring series of deep narrow bays surrounded by highlands on which defensive fortifications were constructed. The Dockyard and its related facilities were built at a time when European nations were battling for supremacy of the seas to obtain control over the lucrative sugar-producing islands of the Eastern Caribbean. Antigua’s location as a front-line naval dockyard facility gave the British navy a strategic advantage over its rivals at a crucial point in history.

      The construction and operation of the Antigua Naval Dockyard were made possible through the labour and skills of enslaved Africans, whose contribution was crucial for the establishment of the facility and, more widely, for the development of the British Empire, trade and industrialisation.

      Criterion (ii): The Antigua Naval Dockyard and its Related Archaeological Sites exhibit an important exchange of human values over a span of time within the Caribbean and between this region and the rest of the Commonwealth, on developments in architecture, technology and exploitation of natural topographical features for strategic military purposes. The enslaved Africans toiling in the service of the British navy and army built and worked the facilities that were critical to the development of the British Empire, trade and industrialisation. The Georgian Period buildings and the archaeological structures and remains stand as testimony to their efforts and continue to influence the architectural, social and economic development of their descendants.

      The Antigua Naval Dockyard exceptionally shows how British Admiralty building prototypes were adapted to cope with extremes of climate, and the lessons learnt in the Caribbean in erecting such buildings were subsequently successfully applied in other colonies. Among the most prominent witnesses of this interchange, Clarence House demonstrates how English Georgian architecture was modified to suit the hot tropical climate and to counter the threat of disease, and the emergence of a distinctly colonial Caribbean Georgian architecture; and the Officers’ Quarters and the Senior Officer’s House demonstrate how building forms were adapted, by the addition of features such as storm shutters and verandas, to suit the climate of the Caribbean. Few other sites demonstrate this transition from British prototypes to the use of colonial building forms as clearly as the Antigua Naval Dockyard.

      Criterion (iv): The ensemble of the Antigua Naval Dockyard and its Related Archaeological Sites were laid down and built exploiting the natural attributes of the area (the deep waters of English Harbour, the series of hills protecting the bay, the jagged contours of the coastline, and the narrow entrance) in a period when European powers were at war to expand their spheres of influence in the Caribbean. Altogether, the property represents an outstanding example of a Georgian naval facility in the Caribbean context.

      The Antigua Naval Dockyard and its Related Archaeological Sites demonstrate the process of colonisation and the global spread of ideas, building forms and technologies by a leading naval power in the 18th century, as well as the exploitation of favourable geo-morphological features for the construction and defence of a strategic compound.

      Integrity

      The inscribed area (255 ha) coincides with the former Naval Dockyard installations and its related former supporting/defensive compounds, which have been in continuous use since 1725. The partially-walled Dockyard includes an important number of historical buildings, whereas the related former supporting/defensive compounds comprise several structures nowadays reduced to archaeological remains. The property still retains its visual integrity and the visual relationships and dynamics between the Dockyard complex (down at sea level) and the former military structures (in the surrounding hills) are still recognizable. Most of the buildings at the Dockyard have either been restored/repaired (fairly recently) or are scheduled to undergo restoration in the near future. On the other hand, archaeological structures outside the Dockyard exhibit an uneven state of conservation that will benefit from a comprehensive conservation strategy based on the adoption of a minimal intervention approach.

      Authenticity

      The Dockyard is located on its original site and continues to be embedded in the same original setting. The buildings within were all originally built between the 18th and 19th centuries and retain their original form and design. Most of them even retain their use and function, and those which do not are used for similar and/or compatible functions. The authenticity of the property in terms of materials, craftsmanship and design will benefit from a continuous cooperation amongst conservation architects, architectural historians and archaeologists in the conception of conservation programmes, projects and works. Archaeological remains are still embedded in a setting which is comparable to the original one; many of the fortifications and supporting facilities retain their original materials and their visual interrelations. Their form and design have not been altered and can be appreciated through archaeology, historical research, consolidation, stabilization and interpretation. The informative potential of archaeological vestiges is overall retained; however, protection and maintenance strategies should be set up in order to avoid further loss of historic substance.

      Protection and management requirements

      The Antigua Naval Dockyard and Related Archaeological Sites have been protected as a National Park since 1984 under the National Parks Act and managed by the National Parks Authority (NPA). Further means of legal protection are obtained by the recently approved new ‘Environmental Management Bill’ (2015) the forthcoming new ‘Heritage Act’, the ‘Physical Planning Act’ (2003), and the ‘Land Use or Physical Development Plan for Antigua and Barbuda’, which defines and establishes zones for appropriate land use. Building Guidelines have been designed to orient conservation interventions of historical buildings and archaeological remains and to set standards for new architecture and new guidelines; high standards regarding the Dockyard’s potential Underwater Cultural Heritage are also needed.

      The system relies on the National Parks Development and Management Plan, which is specifically prepared under the provisions of sub-section 10 (2) of the Antigua and Barbuda National Parks Act (1984). The Management Plan, with its objectives and its operational instruments (land use zoning plan, action plan, conservation plan, marketing plan, guidelines, etc.) forms an integrated management framework that needs to focus on the Outstanding Universal Value of the Antigua Naval Dockyard and Related Archaeological Sites so as to ensure its effective management as a World Heritage property.

    4. Recommends that the State Party gives consideration to the following:
      1. approving the revision of the land-use zone plan as illustrated in the map submitted in the additional information provided in February 2016 so that it is aligned with the main aim of safeguarding the Outstanding Universal Value of the property and the attributes supporting it,
      2. completing the revision of the Management Plan so as to focus it on the sustenance of the Outstanding Universal Value of the property and to ensure that it is complemented by:
        1. revised building guidelines for the conservation of the built and archaeological structures and compatible new design that would assist in managing effectively the property and its values,
        2. a Heritage Impact Assessment approach for all development projects concerning the property and its buffer zone,
        3.  a scientific study to assess the carrying capacity of the property for tourism and related pressures and a tourism and visitor strategy,
        4. an interpretation programme for the restored structures with improved signage,
        5.  an improved monitoring system with appropriate indicators;
      3. approving and putting into effect the new Heritage Act as soon as possible,
      4. completing the comprehensive conservation and maintenance programme for the structures and archaeological remains, taking into account the specific contribution of each of the heritage resources in conveying the property's Outstanding Universal Value and complementing it with graphic technical documentation of the historic/ archaeological structures within the property, as baseline information;
    5. Requests the State Party to submit to the World Heritage Centre by 1 December 2017 a comprehensive and updated report on the implementation of the above-mentioned recommendations for review by ICOMOS.
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    http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions/6810 wh-info@unesco.org Sun, 10 Jul 2016 00:00:00 EST